Students in class

B.S. in Business Administration

A Bachelor of Science in Business Administration is one of the most valuable and versatile degrees available today.

Professionals in a variety of fields and industries can benefit from understanding the basics of finance, marketing, management, and communications. The goal of Saint Mary’s B.S. in Business Administration program is to equip you with this essential knowledge so that you are better prepared to succeed in a rapidly changing business environment.

Curriculum

Courses address current business administration theories and frameworks, lending new perspective to your professional experiences. Whether you’re striving to attain a management position or you’re already in a leadership role, you’ll benefit from this program’s comprehensive curriculum.

Specialization Tracks

Complete the general B.S. in Business Administration program or specialize in one of the following:

  • Management
  • Operations and Technology Management
  • Biomedical Technology Management

Considering a Graduate Degree?

Saint Mary's also offers Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Science in Project Management programs. Qualified students can add a graduate course that will count toward these programs.

Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities, Apple Valley, Oakdale, and Rochester locations.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

A minimum of 122 credits is required for graduation with a bachelor of science degree from Saint Mary's University. All students must meet the general education credit requirements. A minimum of 36 credits is required to complete the B.S. in Business Administration program.

Students may complete the general B.S. in Business Administration program or choose to add an additional specialization in one of the following: Management, Operations & Technology Management, or Biomedical Technology Management.  Students choosing to specialize take an additional 12 credits (36 core program credits + 12 specialization credits = 48 credits total).

Required Business and Management Courses 24 cr.
Required Capstone Course 3 cr.
Required Communication Courses 6 cr.
Elective Course 3 cr.
Total credits: Business Administration Program 36 cr.
Add: Specialization (if desired) 12 credits with designated courses as substitutions for required and/or elective business/management courses 12 cr.
Total credits: Business Administration Program with Specialization 48 cr.

 


Required Business and Management Courses: 24 cr.

BU300 Accounting Principles (3 cr.)

This course is designed to give students the foundations of financial accounting and reporting practices used by decision makers in today's business environments. Financial accounting methods, the accounting cycle, internal controls, and accounting practices for different types of business entities are examined.  Also examined are Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) used in the preparation of financial statements.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the basic Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
  2. Analyze company transactions and prepare journal entries in accordance with GAAP.
  3. Prepare financial statements according to GAAP.
  4. Describe the different types of accounting systems.
  5. Evaluate the information generated by and obtained from company accounting records.
  6. Apply knowledge of accounting principles, theories, and concepts to company transactions.
  7. Analyze and explain the impact of a particular decision on the financial statements of an entity.
  8. Identify the various reporting requirements for different types of business entities.

BU400 Business Law (3 cr.)

This introductory course examines the legal context for business, including the legal and regulatory system, the law of contracts, property laws and torts, and forms of business organization, including partnerships and corporations. The course also introduces law and regulation which affect business activities, including employment law, securities, antitrust, bankruptcy, consumer protections, and environmental laws.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Recognize the variety of legal issues present in their day-to-day business dealings and transactions.
  2. Understand how the American legal system functions with how it interrelates with and impacts the world of business and organizations.
  3. Make business decisions which take into account legal considerations.
  4. Describe methods used to protect themselves and their organizations from adverse legal consequences.
     

BU403 Applied Business Statistics (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to descriptive and inferential statistics for use in business-related applications. Measures of central tendency and dispersion, simple probability, data analysis, and statistical inference are examined. The use of computer software for analyzing statistical data is addressed.

Upon completion of this course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Extract information from sample data through both graphical and numerical methods.
  2. Examine how probability can be used to make an inference about a population from information contained in a sample.
  3. Determine the probabilities associated with both discrete and continuous random variables.
  4. Estimate population means and proportions on a single sample selected from population of interest.
  5. Use the sampling distribution of a sample statistic to assess the reliability of the estimate.
  6. Utilize sample data from a variety of resources to make estimates, decisions, or generalizations about a larger set of data.
  7. Identify various software resources to aid in analyzing data.

BU407 Financial Management (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of financial management of organizations. Topics covered include the assessment of types of business entities and capital acquisition sources, basic financial statement analysis, the assessment of how income taxes impact the financial decision-making process, the evaluation of capital projects using the time value of money concepts, management of an entity's current assets and current liabilities, and the maximization of shareholder wealth.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and describe the various forms of business organizations and the different ways in which they are financed.
  2. Explain the financial reporting requirements for different types of business entities.
  3. Apply the principles of managing current assets and current liabilities to different types of business entities.
  4. Assess the existence of management problems or opportunities by analyzing company financial statements and making comparisons to other companies in the same industry.
  5. Compute net present values calculations and use them in financial decision making.
  6. Prepare cash flow budgets.
  7. Prepare a breakeven analysis for profit planning.
  8. Identify and explain how the actions of the federal government may impact financial decision making.

MG305 Managerial Ethics (3 cr.)

This course covers the ethical issues and social responsibilities considered by business managers in the global economy. The frameworks and reasoning skills relevant for understanding and addressing ethical dilemmas in business organizations are explored. The social, political, global, and economic environments within which ethical issues occur are assessed.  Finally, the legal and regulatory implications of decision making in business organizations are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the moral traditions, values, and philosophies that have influenced contemporary business ethics.
  2. Assess the variety of ethical issues that have the potential for impacting organizations in the global economy.
  3. Recognize the importance of ethical decision making as a component of management and leadership.
  4. Explore the characteristics and significance of various ethical frameworks and theories.
  5. Assess the impact of globalization on the ethical decision-making process.
  6. Examine the legal and regulatory forces that impact business practices and operations.
  7. Evaluate the scope and significance of socially responsible business practices.

 

MG311 Economics for Managers (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the macro and microeconomics theories used by individuals in various management and business professions. The economic decisions made by households and organizations in various markets are examined. Also examined are the laws of supply and demand, the macroeconomic indicators of the economy, business cycle analysis, the forces of production and consumption, labor market theory, and consumer choice. The impact of government economic policies on organizations is also examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the principles of macro and microeconomics.
  2. Evaluate the market forces involved in supply and demand.
  3. Describe the interaction between consumers and producers.
  4. Explain the dynamics of international trade.
  5. Describe how a nation's income and cost of living are measured.
  6. Explain how the monetary system works.
  7. Identify the economics of the public sector.

MG410 Applied Leadership and Management (3 cr.)

This course explores the application of leadership and management theory in today's business organizations.  Contemporary organizational leadership theories and practices are examined.  Also examined are management functions such as planning, organizing, and decision making.  The course emphasizes the analysis of leadership and management skills needed by professionals in various organizational situations.  Leadership and management practices in the context of various organizational trends are evaluated.

Upon completion of this course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess various leadership and management theories, frameworks, and concepts.
  2. Explain the roles and responsibilities required of leaders and managers in various organizational contexts.
  3. Analyze the circumstances that require the application and practice of leadership and management skills.
  4. Evaluate the significance of both formal and informal leadership roles in an organization. 
  5. Demonstrate management skills such as planning, goal setting, decision making, and measuring outcomes.
  6. Explore emerging trends that impact organizations such as global competition, workforce diversity, corporate social responsibility, and organizational change that leaders and managers need to understand.
  7. Assess the impact of effective leadership in developing ethical organizational cultures.

MG412 Critical Thinking for Organizational Leaders (3 cr.)

This course examines the relevance and application of critical thinking and decision-making techniques for leadership and management in various organizations.  Students identify and evaluate the leadership and management capabilities of themselves and others.  The course focuses on eliciting new leadership insights, and on improving problem solving and decision-making skills.  Finally, the course emphasizes the skills leaders and managers in organizations need to articulate reasoned solutions to organizational problems and opportunities.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the roles and responsibilities of leaders and managers as problem solvers in organizations.
  2. Assess the decision-making challenges facing leaders and managers in various organizational settings.
  3. Utilize critical thinking as an imaginative process in organizational leadership and management.
  4. Evaluate the leadership and management capabilities, strengths, and skills within a team.
  5. Demonstrate the use of critical thinking to navigate the complexity of organizational challenges and opportunities.
  6. Explore various knowledge management and decision-making tools and systems.
  7. Assess the impact of change on individuals and organizations and the significance of change management strategies.

 

MK300 Principles of Marketing (3 cr.)

This course addresses the role of marketing in organizations.  It examines the fundamental marketing mix elements of product, price, placement, and promotion that comprise organizational marketing strategies. It further explores how the marketing mix elements are strategically implemented to create and deliver products, services, or ideas to consumers.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the basic marketing mix elements of product, pricing, placement, and promotion.
  2. Explain how organizations coordinate the marketing mix elements as part of their strategic marketing initiatives in the context of various environmental situations.
  3. Recognize the various theoretical perspectives on consumer buying behavior as a means for better meeting the needs and wants of target customers.
  4. Review the basic approaches and uses of marketing research as a means for understanding consumer and business buying practices.
  5. Demonstrate how market segmentation, product positioning and target marketing are used to enhance organizational success.
  6. Appraise the ethical issues facing contemporary marketing efforts.
  7. Evaluate the various elements that make up the marketing function, and propose a strategic marketing approach that is aligned with organizational goals.

Required Capstone Course: 3 cr.

BU490 Strategic Management Capstone (3 cr.)

This course integrates knowledge and skills developed in a student’s major course of study. Students integrate and apply knowledge and skills acquired throughout their academic programs. Students also demonstrate professional communications via written reports and oral presentations, outline continuing education strategies, and analyze ethical and diversity issues in business organizations.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking skills related to their major field of academic study.
  2. Analyze the environmental variables and available resources affecting business-related issues and strategies.
  3. Synthesize various business-related strategies.
  4. Identify management principles relevant for business professionals.
  5. Assess the impact of ethical decisions in various business organizations.
  6. Address diversity in various business environments.
  7. Develop strategies for continuing education in their academic field of study.
  8. Communicate using inclusive methods in a variety of modes.
  9. Recognize current trends in their academic field of study.
  10. Demonstrate interpersonal communication and collaboration skills required in various business settings.
     

Required Communication Courses: 6 cr.

COM309 Professional Writing (3 cr.)

This course provides strategies for developing a clear, concise professional writing style. A variety of writing formats are addressed. Research for professional documents, writing in an electronic environment, and collaborative writing are considered. Voice, style, audience, purpose, the writing process, and strategies for editing and revision are examined in the context of interpersonal and ethical dimensions.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Write effectively in various forms of professional writing.
  2. Demonstrate writing in a professional environment.
  3. Exhibit a professional voice and writing style.
  4. Effectively incorporate relevant research into professional writing.
  5. Understand and apply the writing process to diverse audiences and purposes.
  6. Effectively incorporate elements of professional document design into print and electronic documents.
  7. Employ professional revision and editing skills.
     

COM310 Oral Communications (3 cr.)

Communication skills pertinent to organizational settings form the foundation of this course.  Effective methods for design and delivery of oral communication are examined. Other topics include communication styles, effective listening, interpersonal communication skills, dynamics of small group communication and persuasive speaking, all in the context of professional workplace communications.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate effective oral communication skills.
  2. Demonstrate effective and active listening skills.
  3. Recognize and adapt to differing communication styles.
  4. Demonstrate skill in interpersonal communication.
  5. Understand small group dynamics.
  6. Demonstrate persuasive speaking techniques.
  7. Effectively create and utilize graphics or other appropriate media in professional presentations.
  8. Deliver organized, professional informational and persuasive presentations.
     

Required Elective Course: 3 cr.

BUxxx Elective Choices ( cr.)

Students may select any 300 or 400-level business, human resource management or marketing course, or COM409, as an elective.  Courses may be found at Undergraduate Requirements and Shared Core Courses, Human Resource Management, B.S., and Marketing, B.S.   Students can also select one of the following information technology courses: IT301 Information Technology Perspectives, IT312 Emerging Trends in Business Technology, IT440 Business Intelligence Fundamentals, IT457 Cloud Computing Fundamentals, or IT305 Enterprise Architecture Fundamentals.  Courses may be found at Information Technology, B.S. 

Students who anticipate enrolling in the Master of Business Administration (MBA) at Saint Mary's University may take MBA610 Organizations and Human Behavior or MBA613 Ethical Leadership. The B.S. completion program director must advise the student and approve enrollment in the graduate course. The graduate course must be taken within the final 12 credits of the B.S. completion degree. The graduate course may be applied to the program requirements for Saint Mary's MBA program, if the student earns a grade of B or higher in the course.

Management Specialization: 12 cr.

The Management specialization provides the management skills needed by leaders working in a variety of organizations. In addition to the comprehensive business curriculum provided by the core business administration program courses, the Management specialization helps prepare students with additional managerial skills needed in a variety of business-related disciplines. The specialization consists of the following four additional courses:

HR340 Strategic Human Resource Management (3 cr.)

This course examines strategic human resource functions performed in organizations.  It includes planning, job analysis and design, job description, recruiting and hiring, training, performance management, regulation, evaluation, benefits, and labor law. Trends impacting the field are examined, including the use of technology in managing human resource functions, and the role of human resources in a global business environment.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze human resource management and its component functions.
  2. Appraise human resource's organizational role in strategic planning.
  3. Develop a strategic plan that addresses a relevant human resource issue.
  4. Apply human resource management theories to practice in organizations.
  5. Analyze how social and cultural factors impact human resource strategy both domestically and in the global environment.
  6. Explain how technology is incorporated within human resource functions.

 

MG408 Project Management (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes leadership concepts related to directing and coordinating human and material resources for relatively short-term projects that have been established to complete specific goals and objectives. The skills and procedures needed to take a project from definition through completion are presented.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the critical technical competencies in project management.
  2. Explain the dynamics of project team development and interpersonal problem solving.
  3. Identify strategies for effective team building.
  4. Evaluate the critical dimensions of project scope, time, communication, quality, risk, and cost management.
  5. Identify strategies for effective project monitoring and controlling.
  6. Describe several project management practices that lead to project success.
  7. Demonstrate how plan development is integrated into the basic functions of a business organization.

MG410 Applied Leadership and Management (3 cr.)

This course explores the application of leadership and management theory in today's business organizations.  Contemporary organizational leadership theories and practices are examined.  Also examined are management functions such as planning, organizing, and decision making.  The course emphasizes the analysis of leadership and management skills needed by professionals in various organizational situations.  Leadership and management practices in the context of various organizational trends are evaluated.

Upon completion of this course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess various leadership and management theories, frameworks, and concepts.
  2. Explain the roles and responsibilities required of leaders and managers in various organizational contexts.
  3. Analyze the circumstances that require the application and practice of leadership and management skills.
  4. Evaluate the significance of both formal and informal leadership roles in an organization. 
  5. Demonstrate management skills such as planning, goal setting, decision making, and measuring outcomes.
  6. Explore emerging trends that impact organizations such as global competition, workforce diversity, corporate social responsibility, and organizational change that leaders and managers need to understand.
  7. Assess the impact of effective leadership in developing ethical organizational cultures.

MG412 Critical Thinking for Organizational Leaders (3 cr.)

This course examines the relevance and application of critical thinking and decision-making techniques for leadership and management in various organizations.  Students identify and evaluate the leadership and management capabilities of themselves and others.  The course focuses on eliciting new leadership insights, and on improving problem solving and decision-making skills.  Finally, the course emphasizes the skills leaders and managers in organizations need to articulate reasoned solutions to organizational problems and opportunities.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the roles and responsibilities of leaders and managers as problem solvers in organizations.
  2. Assess the decision-making challenges facing leaders and managers in various organizational settings.
  3. Utilize critical thinking as an imaginative process in organizational leadership and management.
  4. Evaluate the leadership and management capabilities, strengths, and skills within a team.
  5. Demonstrate the use of critical thinking to navigate the complexity of organizational challenges and opportunities.
  6. Explore various knowledge management and decision-making tools and systems.
  7. Assess the impact of change on individuals and organizations and the significance of change management strategies.

 

MG415 Total Quality and Team Development (3 cr.)

The focus of this course is the development of total quality or continuous improvement in organizations. It reviews the phenomenon of quality, key theories and theorists, statistical process control, and quality programs. Effective team management is emphasized as one of the key components of quality.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the managerial and philosophical meanings of quality.
  2. Describe the continuous improvement process as it relates to manufacturing/service industries.
  3. Formulate basic problem solving approaches to implement short term solutions and eliminate the root causes of quality problems.
  4. Discuss quality program standards as they relate to the quality improvement process.
  5. Develop and analyze statistical process control charts used for monitoring processes.
  6. Discuss the different approaches to the use of teams in the quality process.
     

Operations & Technology Management Specialization: 12 cr.

The Operations & Technology Management specialization provides the management and technology skills needed by leaders working in various business operations environments. In addition to the comprehensive business curriculum provided by the core Business Administration program courses, the Operations Management & Technology specialization provides students with additional total quality, business operations, and technology curriculum applicable to a variety of manufacturing and service organization environments. The specialization consists of the following four additional courses:

BU460 Engineering Economics (3 cr.)

This course focuses on an introduction to investment and replacement analysis along with methods for financing various enterprises including mergers and acquisitions. Topics include cost control, valuation depreciation, replacement theory and taxation.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze cash flow budgets as they relate to engineering economy.
  2. Compare engineering alternatives using analytical techniques that include present value and discounted cash flow analysis, incremental analysis, internal rate of return, and break even analysis.
  3. Utilize sensitivity analysis to critique and compare project options.
  4. Describe capital budgeting and the competition for funds amongst various projects based on a corporate minimum attractive rate of return.
  5. Estimate tax consequences of capital and project decisions.
  6. Explain the application of expected value, probability analysis and risk analysis in comparing project alternatives.
  7. Discuss the non-quantifiable aspects of economic decisions.

IT301 Information Technology Perspectives (3 cr.)

This course provides a context for understanding the information technology industry. Trends in the industry and viable career options are identified and explored. Important technological shifts in the industry are examined. The fundamentals of career management and self-identification of a specialized and marketable segment of the information technology industry are covered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate current information technologies and their demands for business applications.
  2. Develop a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree program portfolio.
  3. Describe the key components of the Information Technology Program curriculum to showcase IT skills learned during each course in the program.
  4. Develop an actionable career plan to include developing effective resumes and cover letters.
  5. Analyze career advancement opportunities.

IT457 Cloud Computing Fundamentals (3 cr.)

This course introduces the fundamental building blocks of cloud computing and virtualized data centers, with an emphasis on the design, implementation, and operation of real-world cloud-based systems. Students examine the meaning of the term "cloud computing" and its proper context; evaluate the financial, strategic and risk implications of various solutions; develop design methodologies for evaluating, planning and implementing cloud computing; and select the optimal blend of cloud applications and services for solving common business problems. 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explain cloud computing concepts to a business audience in layman's terms.
  2. Explain how the architectural components in various cloud computing frameworks fit together.
  3. Evaluate the operational and financial feasibility of implementing a cloud computing solution to solve a given business problem.
  4.  Develop a project proposal for evaluating, planning and implementing a specific cloud computing solution.
  5.  Identify and discuss the pros and cons of utilizing commercially available cloud computing services.

IT490 Bachelor of Science Completion Capstone (3 cr.)

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate knowledge and skills developed in the Information Technology program and to apply them to a relevant topic. Students select a problem or controversial issue in their area of specialization, research the issue, analyze and critique material related to the topic, and design an application or approach that addresses the issue. Additionally, students demonstrate the educational outcomes of the Information Technology program. The capstone is presented in a business context.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
  2. Understand ethical implications as they relate to their project.
  3. Develop strategies for continuing education and competence in the student's chosen field of study.
  4. Communicate using inclusive methods in a variety of modes.
  5. Identify management principles relevant to their final project.
  6. Address diversity as it relates to their selected issue, field of study and profession.
  7. Identify available resources within their field pertaining to their final project.
  8. Recognize and adapt to trends in their field of study.

MG415 Total Quality and Team Development (3 cr.)

The focus of this course is the development of total quality or continuous improvement in organizations. It reviews the phenomenon of quality, key theories and theorists, statistical process control, and quality programs. Effective team management is emphasized as one of the key components of quality.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the managerial and philosophical meanings of quality.
  2. Describe the continuous improvement process as it relates to manufacturing/service industries.
  3. Formulate basic problem solving approaches to implement short term solutions and eliminate the root causes of quality problems.
  4. Discuss quality program standards as they relate to the quality improvement process.
  5. Develop and analyze statistical process control charts used for monitoring processes.
  6. Discuss the different approaches to the use of teams in the quality process.
     

MG450 Operations Management (3 cr.)

This course provides an analytical systems viewpoint for management decision making and problem solving in a production operations setting.  Included is an introduction to quality, process design, facility planning and location, scheduling, and materials planning.  This course also reviews problem-solving methodologies that apply a systematic approach to problem identification and resolution within a system.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the various types of production operations environments.
  2. Examine operations management from a systems perspective.
  3. Describe the methods of effective problem solving for managing various productions operations processes.
  4. Evaluate the dynamics of quality control required for successful operations management.
  5. Analyze the various constraints and strategies that might be implemented to meet operational capacity requirements.
  6. Develop a systematic and integrated operations management plan.

 

Biomedical Technology Management Specialization: 12 cr.

The Biomedical Technology Management specialization provides the management, administrative, and technology skills needed by leaders working in the fields of biomedical manufacturing and product development. In addition to the comprehensive business curriculum provided by the core Business Administration program courses, the Biomedical Technology Management specialization helps prepare students to assess the biomedical technology environment and become better managers and leaders in this industry. The specialization consists of the following four additional courses:

BU460 Engineering Economics (3 cr.)

This course focuses on an introduction to investment and replacement analysis along with methods for financing various enterprises including mergers and acquisitions. Topics include cost control, valuation depreciation, replacement theory and taxation.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze cash flow budgets as they relate to engineering economy.
  2. Compare engineering alternatives using analytical techniques that include present value and discounted cash flow analysis, incremental analysis, internal rate of return, and break even analysis.
  3. Utilize sensitivity analysis to critique and compare project options.
  4. Describe capital budgeting and the competition for funds amongst various projects based on a corporate minimum attractive rate of return.
  5. Estimate tax consequences of capital and project decisions.
  6. Explain the application of expected value, probability analysis and risk analysis in comparing project alternatives.
  7. Discuss the non-quantifiable aspects of economic decisions.

BU477 Biomedical Technology Management (3 cr.)

This course explores the application of management theories and concepts in today's biomedical technology industry.  Best practices related to the management of various biomedical technology processes are examined.  Also examined are the essential managerial skills required for managing biomedical technology operations.  This course emphasizes an understanding of the various regulations and ethical practices inherent to the biomedical technology industry.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess the scope and nature of the biomedical technology industry in today's global economy.
  2. Identify the roles and responsibilities required of biomedical technology operations managers.
  3. Demonstrate skills such as planning, goal setting, organizing, and measuring outcomes required of biomedical technology managers.
  4. Analyze the circumstances that require the application and practice of managerial skills.
  5. Describe best practices in the field of biomedical technology management.
  6. Explain the various regulations and ethical practices that govern the biomedical technology industry.

 

IT301 Information Technology Perspectives (3 cr.)

This course provides a context for understanding the information technology industry. Trends in the industry and viable career options are identified and explored. Important technological shifts in the industry are examined. The fundamentals of career management and self-identification of a specialized and marketable segment of the information technology industry are covered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate current information technologies and their demands for business applications.
  2. Develop a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree program portfolio.
  3. Describe the key components of the Information Technology Program curriculum to showcase IT skills learned during each course in the program.
  4. Develop an actionable career plan to include developing effective resumes and cover letters.
  5. Analyze career advancement opportunities.

MG415 Total Quality and Team Development (3 cr.)

The focus of this course is the development of total quality or continuous improvement in organizations. It reviews the phenomenon of quality, key theories and theorists, statistical process control, and quality programs. Effective team management is emphasized as one of the key components of quality.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the managerial and philosophical meanings of quality.
  2. Describe the continuous improvement process as it relates to manufacturing/service industries.
  3. Formulate basic problem solving approaches to implement short term solutions and eliminate the root causes of quality problems.
  4. Discuss quality program standards as they relate to the quality improvement process.
  5. Develop and analyze statistical process control charts used for monitoring processes.
  6. Discuss the different approaches to the use of teams in the quality process.
     

MG450 Operations Management (3 cr.)

This course provides an analytical systems viewpoint for management decision making and problem solving in a production operations setting.  Included is an introduction to quality, process design, facility planning and location, scheduling, and materials planning.  This course also reviews problem-solving methodologies that apply a systematic approach to problem identification and resolution within a system.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the various types of production operations environments.
  2. Examine operations management from a systems perspective.
  3. Describe the methods of effective problem solving for managing various productions operations processes.
  4. Evaluate the dynamics of quality control required for successful operations management.
  5. Analyze the various constraints and strategies that might be implemented to meet operational capacity requirements.
  6. Develop a systematic and integrated operations management plan.

 

MK430 Product Life Cycle Management (3 cr.)

This course focuses on managing products and services throughout their life cycles. Topics include product and service opportunity identification; new product and service innovation, development, design, and idea testing; and development team management. Product and service launching strategies, pricing approaches, and promotional techniques are explored. Also discussed are branding concepts and brand management strategies.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine the processes and strategies used to manage products, product lines, and services throughout the entire course of their life cycles.
  2. Identify product attributes that marketers must consider, including product designs and features, packaging, product variety and quality, and brand names.
  3. Identify service attributes that marketers must consider, including service intangibility, inseparability, and perishability.
  4. Explain how new products and services are developed and tested, and discuss how product development teams play an integral role in bringing these offerings to market.
  5. Examine product and service branding strategies, and discuss the importance of branding for establishing a competitive advantage.
  6. Evaluate various product development strategies to include line extensions, brand extensions, and multibranding.
  7. Recognize the pricing and promotional approaches used in product management initiatives.
     



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