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M.A. in Management

With a Master of Arts in Management from Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, you’ll develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills needed to serve as a leader who promotes effective performance in today’s changing business environment.

Unlike a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), the M.A. in Management curriculum is intentionally designed to build analytical and interpersonal skills, providing broad exposure to the topics managers most encounter—finance, marketing, project management, communication, human resources, legal issues, and ethics.

As with all Saint Mary’s programs, students who enroll in the M.A. in Management program will receive instruction from professors who are leaders in the field and will build a professional network that will support them in their educational journeys and beyond.

From Start to Finish

The M.A. in Management program consists of 11 3-credit courses and a 3-credit capstone. Apply today.

Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities and Rochester locations.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

Required Management Courses 33 cr.
Required Capstone Course 3 cr.
Total 36 cr.


Students may take GM600 or ACM600; GM645 or ACM645; GM660 or ACM660


Required Management Courses: 30 cr.

ACM600 Management of Nonprofit Organizations (3 cr.)

This course is an overview of management of nonprofit organizations within the broader societal context. The course examines the broad historic and current context for work in the nonprofit sector; strategic leadership, including board governance and executive leadership within an organizational life cycles framework; concepts of business strategy, strategic planning, benchmarking, and evaluation; and an overview of operations planning. Strategic linkages between an organization's mission and values, strategic direction, and programming are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze types and characteristics of nonprofit operating principles and structures.
  2. Apply concepts of nonprofit accountability and ownership.
  3. Analyze the relationship between external factors and organizational programs.
  4. Explain operations and characteristics of a board governance model.
  5. Compare and contrast strategic planning and strategic management.
  6. Create measurable benchmarks for monitoring progress against strategy.
  7. Evaluate operating goals, objectives, tactics, and implementation tools.
  8. Analyze the role of strategic planning within organizational life, explaining the relationship among organizational mission, strategy, vision, and values.

ACM645 Marketing for Nonprofits (3 cr.)

The course examines practical strategies and trends in marketing for small and mid-sized nonprofit organizations. Topics include the role of marketing in nonprofits, marketing research and planning, marketing's impact on organizational revenue, relationship between marketing and fund development, types of marketing tools and strategies, audience identification and development, and role of staff and board of directors in nonprofit marketing.  Also explored is the role of technology and social media in marketing.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Characterize a nonprofit audience profile in preparing effective marketing strategies.
  2. Employ positioning strategies, branding, and target marketing to benefit the organization.
  3. Identify the proper role and benefits of various marketing tools.
  4. Apply modern marketing approaches using appropriate technology to nonprofits.
  5. Develop an effective marketing plan.
  6. Describe the role of marketing in a nonprofit organization.

ACM660 Nonprofit Financial Management (3 cr.)

This course presents generally accepted financial management principles and practices applicable to nonprofit organizations. Financial statements and reports are interpreted and analyzed, and financial analysis tools are applied to describe and evaluate the financial condition of nonprofit organizations. Related topics include budgeting, description of financial systems, and legal reporting requirements for nonprofit organizations.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Interpret and evaluate the financial condition of an organization utilizing financial statements.
  2. Utilize financial statements as a basis for decision-making.
  3. Prepare and analyze operating budgets.
  4. Employ the use of budgeting and financial monitoring systems to support decision-making.
  5. Describe general financial issues within a nonprofit organization.
  6. Explain the standards utilized by watchdog organizations.

GM600 Management Principles (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of key organizational and behavioral concepts, which underlie effective management practice in private and public sector organizations. Management strategies are examined and compared. Special attention is given to defining and interpreting cross-cultural differences and influences. The course gives attention to the local and global trends, both existing and emerging, that influence organizational structure, behavior and change.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Synthesize and build creatively on concepts about management roles in planning, organizing, leading and oversight in the 21st Century;
  2. Analyze the management challenges of organizations in today's global marketplace;
  3. Evaluate and apply management strategies to real world problems;
  4. Outline a rationale for integrating corporate responsibility and social justice into the organization; and
  5. Identify personal management skills and competencies.

GM623 Academic Research and Writing (3 cr.)

This course focuses on graduate academic writing skills, including voice and style, writing that incorporates source material, ethical use of source material, APA writing guidelines, and revising writing.  Students learn to locate and evaluate resources relevant to the research and writing process.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Develop a research question, delineating the complexity in an issue.
  2. Use information from a variety of sources relevant to a question.
  3. Evaluate information for relevance and credibility.
  4. Analyze and synthesize scholarly articles.
  5. Integrate source material into academic writing, including correct use of summary, paraphrase, and quotation, along with proper citation.
  6. Incorporate different points of view on an issue.
  7. Write clearly and concisely.
  8. Demonstrate skills in rewriting, editing, and proofreading.

GM630 Quantitative Methods (3 cr.)

This course focuses on statistical analysis of data for professional applications or research with an emphasis on quantitative methodologies. The course covers populations, sample selection, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Significance, Chi Square, correlations, analysis of variance and simple regression, and concepts of reliability, validity and levels of measurement are addressed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply statistical ideas and practicalities to real world quantitative situations within organizations.
  2. Read and interpret the statistical content of literature relating to management of people and resources.
  3. Analyze statistics through performing basic computation both by hand and with computer software.
  4. Determine and apply the appropriate inferential analysis for different types of data and derive correct conclusions.

GM640 Legal Issues for Managers (3 cr.)

This course is an overview of the American legal system and its impact on organizational decision making. It emphasizes identifying legal issues in management in the areas of torts, contracts, employment, and discrimination law. In addition, this course surveys current trends and issues in business law and the impact they have on today’s society.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the fundamental components and processes of the American legal and governmental systems.
  2. Analyze the legal rights and liabilities of public and private employers and employees.
  3. Define and apply the basic principles of contract, tort, and discrimination law relevant to management.
  4. Analyze state and federal legal issues addressed by business and industry, including wage and overtime, safety in the workplace, social media in the workplace, and employee right to privacy.
  5. Identify legal issues critical to managers and appropriately respond.

 

GM645 Marketing Management (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes a practical and comprehensive application of key marketing concepts as they apply to businesses and organizations. Major marketing principles and strategies are explored from a managerial perspective as they apply to the marketplace domestically and around the world.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply key marketing concepts, models, theory, and tools in a strategic marketing approach to business situations.
  2. Analyze the role of the marketing function and its complex nature in organizational management.
  3. Develop a marketing plan for a product or service.
  4. Analyze and communicate marketing issues facing the organization and the range of solutions available.
  5. Identify the constantly changing conditions facing marketers in a global market.
  6. Analyze appropriate strategies for effective social media marketing.
  7. Create and deliver a professional oral presentation using appropriate content, style, and audiovisual support.

GM655 Human Resource Management (3 cr.)

This course examines core areas of talent acquisition, compensation and benefits, employee relations, and employee development in both service and product-driven organizations. It emphasizes the application the application of effective human resource management principles to the issues faced by organizations today.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Outline the key components of the human resource management and the value added by this functional area.
  2. Identify HR issues and situations in today’s organizations and relevant laws impacting them.
  3. Analyze human resource management’s organizational role in strategic planning and organizational effectiveness.
  4. Apply the fundamentals of effective analysis and job descriptions and evaluation.
  5. Leverage performance review strategies to motivate and develop employees and support accountability.
  6. Analyze the components of cultural competency and how to use it to create greater inclusion in the work place.
     

 

GM660 Financial Management (3 cr.)

This course introduces, discusses and analyzes financial issues facing profit, not-for-profit and governmental organizations in today's domestic and global business environment. The course provides the general manager with an ethical financial manager's perspective through examination of various financial areas including types of organizations; sources of capital; financial statement analysis; asset management; time value of money; international payments and foreign exchange rates; trade theory and policy; and investment in the US and in foreign countries.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the various forms of business entities and the different ways of financing them.
  2. Analyze the financial reporting requirements of the differing entities.
  3. Apply the principles of managing current assets and current liabilities.
  4. Assess the existence of management problems or and opportunities through analyzing of a company's financial statements and making comparisons to other companies in the same industry.
  5. Compute present values and use them in financial decision making.
  6. Analyze the global economy and its impact on the domestic economy.
  7. Identify the impact of unethical behavior by an entity's general and financial managers on the entity and its owners.
  8. Outline the mechanics and risks of operating an entity in a global marketplace.

GM675 Managerial Ethics and Issues (3 cr.)

This course examines philosophical theories and ethical practices that can be used to resolve organizational dilemmas.  The course emphasizes the role of managers to strengthen the ethical culture of the organization.  Application of ethical principles and models to deal with complex ethical issues facing domestic and global organizations is studied.  Students develop skills in values-based decision making built upon integrity and accountability.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and assess the extent of ethical issues that face organizations, communities, and stakeholder groups.
  2. Recognize how ethical theories, principles, and models provide options for examining complex ethical issues.
  3. Analyze how organizational and cultural norms affect the ability of people within it to act ethically.
  4. Consider value-based decision making to select options that are congruent with business.
  5. Develop a framework for resolving complex ethical dilemmas.
  6. Apply ethical theories, models, and principles.
     

 

GM680 Leadership and Strategic Management (3 cr.)

This course introduces selected models and practices in the exploration of what effective leadership is, including understanding one's own leadership style.  The course also examines both the theory and application of strategic management tasks of leaders, including conducting a strategic analysis, developing a strategic plan, and implementing strategic change.

Upon completion of this course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze their own leadership style in order to adapt and develop effective leadership behaviors. 
  2. Apply the foundations of leadership and decision-making required when dealing with situations marked by change and transition.
  3. Apply one or more processes for developing a strategic plan.
  4. Identify the distinct challenges of strategic planning and strategic management.
  5. Evaluate an organization's business model and develop of a set of action steps for improving its strategy and effectiveness.
  6. Identify and apply the steps required to lead change effectively.

PRM600 Fundamentals of Project Management (3 cr.)

This foundation course examines the project management framework. This framework covers key terminology, project management context, and processes. Topics include project management knowledge areas, life cycles, and organizational designs.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply key project management terms.
  2. Analyze the environment in which projects operate.
  3. Describe a generalized view of how the various project management processes commonly interact.
  4. Identify project integration, scope, time, cost, quality, human resource, communications, risk, and procurement management process inputs, tools and techniques, and outputs.
  5. Identify life cycle phases appropriate to a project.
  6. Analyze stakeholder needs and expectations.

Required Capstone Course: 3 cr.

GM689 Management Capstone (3 cr.)

This course focuses on integrating management knowledge, skills and tools developed in previous management courses. It emphasizes critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation of the theories and application of management. It includes a major research paper and presentation on a management topic of the student's choice.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze their own leadership style in order to adapt and develop effective leadership behaviors.
  2. Apply the foundations of leadership and decision-making required when dealing with situations marked by change and transition.
  3. Apply one or more processes for developing a strategic plan.
  4. Identify the distinct challenges of strategic planning and strategic management.
  5. Outline how to facilitate the development of a mission/vision/values statement and set of objectives for an organization.
  6. Develop and implement strategy and evaluate performance within an organization.

GM690 Capstone Simulation (3 cr.)

This critical integrating course allows students to synthesize and apply concepts and experiences gained through the use of a simulation. Working in teams, students take part in a dynamic competition to turn struggling companies into successful, profitable businesses. The simulation leads students to focus on a coordinated strategy for research and development, marketing, production and finance, the key elements that interact to successfully operate and grow a business. Skills in critical thinking, data analysis and decision making are clarified and honed.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Synthesize and apply management knowledge, skills, and experiences from their program.
  2. Think strategically about an organization's current position, resources, competitive advantage, and long-term objectives.
  3. Demonstrate and document critical thinking in analyzing data and making strategic decisions that lead to successful business outcomes.
  4. Analyze and critique the outcomes of simulated business operations demonstrating understanding of cross-functional linkage and financial results.
  5. Recognize and apply effective team dynamics.

Elective Courses: 3 cr.

ACM630 Fund Development (3 cr.)

This course examines techniques, tools, and strategies needed for the development of contributed revenue in nonprofit organizations. Topics include development and assessment of an organization's fund development plan; preparation of grant proposals, other type of appeals, and special events; coordination of capital campaigns and planned giving; and examination of how different types of organizations manage fund development needs. Also discussed are the donor's viewpoint and emerging trends in philanthropy, and the ethics and legalities of fundraising.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify funding opportunities appropriate to an organization.
  2. Evaluate components of various types of fundraising campaigns.
  3. Discuss role of staff and board members in meeting fundraising objectives.
  4. Evaluate a targeted funding appeal.
  5. Design a contributed revenue strategy.
  6. Summarize the adequacy of an organization’s fund development program and position.
  7. Assess the ethical implications of various fundraising strategies.

GM605 Creative Problem Solving and Critical Thinking (3 cr.)

This course gives students the opportunity to learn and practice higher level thinking skills such as curiosity and imagination, divergent thinking, idea generation, creative problem solving, evaluation, synthesis, critical thinking, and analysis. Students develop strategies to search for challenges, identify problems, produce creative ideas, research solutions, design innovative applications, and build a case for the solution.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the importance of creativity and the need for creative leadership in business and society today.
  2. Apply concepts, principles, definitions, and creative problem solving.
  3. Apply techniques and skills of creative and analytical thinking.
  4. Utilize both creative and analytical skills in problem-solving situations.
  5. Practice both traditional and contemporary models of decision making in situations marked by change and transition.
  6. Use problem-solving models to address problems in their own organizations.

GM643 Multicultural Perspectives (3 cr.)

This course focuses on how diversity of all kinds influences both organizational behavior and client outcomes. The place of culture in society, the marketplace, and the workplace is examined. The importance of cultural competence is explored along with the knowledge and skills needed to work with, manage, and serve diverse groups of workers and clients.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the wide spectrum of differences included in the definitions of diversity and multiculturalism.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of their own cultural identity, background and biases, and forces that shape(d) them.
  3. Analyze how these shaping forces and biases may influence their interactions with people from diverse backgrounds and organizational behavior and productivity.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to articulate, in supportive ways, the needs and concerns of diverse groups of people with marginalized identities in the workplace.
  5. Analyze opportunities for applying cultural competencies to create greater inclusion in the work place.
  6. Plan for the evaluation of cultural competence initiatives, and the resulting effect on organizational behavior, work productivity and products.
     

GM667 Information Technology (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of planning and managing and using technology and information in organizations. It addresses present and future issues regarding information technology (IT) and its impact on management and operations.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze how using information technology (systems and its products) delivers a competitive advantage in an organization's market sector.
  2. Identify the role information technology plays in promoting better management decisions, strategic advantage, quality and ethical best practices.
  3. Evaluate the basic technologies, infrastructure, software, and data resources associated with the new electronic world of information technology.
  4. Analyze the need for integrating an organization's goals and objectives with their use of information technology.
  5. Evaluate information technology product development methodologies.
  6. Analyze why and how knowledge is a competitive advantage and analyze how management can leverage the information that is accessible in databases.



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Connect With Us

Austin Pippin

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Business and Technology

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH114

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5198

apippin@smumn.edu

Austin Pippin

Faculty

Robert Andersen, M.S.

Director of Instructional Technology

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH172

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5206

rganders@smumn.edu

Robert Andersen M.S.
Robert Barnett, Ph.D.

Management Minneapolis - Adjunct School Professors

Richard Bernardo, M.A.

Bachelor's Completion Program - Adjunct Assistant Professor

George Brophy, M.S.

Management Program - Adjunct Associate Professor

Michael Brown, M.A.

MA in Management - Adjunct Instructor

Holly Bunn, M.Ed.

MA in Management - Adjunct Instructor

(507) 284-3674

hbunn@smumn.edu

Jeffrey Cookson, M.F.A.

Human Resource Management - Adjunct Instructor

Adrian Dingley, M.A.

Human Resource Management - Adjunct Instructor

John Forde, M.A.

Business Ethics - Adjunct Instructor

Robert Frie, Ed.D.

Adjunct Faculty

(507) 255-1452

rxfrie02@smumn.edu

Keith Halperin, Ph.D.

Arts & Cultural Management Program - Adjunct Assistant Professor

Daniel Heuel, J.D.

Grad Management - Adjunct Program Assistant Professor

(507) 289-4041

dheuel@smumn.edu

Hassen Hussein, M.B.A.

MA in Management - Adjunct Assistant Professor

Peggy Kennedy, M.Ed.

MA in Management - Adjunct Instructor

(651) 604-3771

pkennedy@smumn.edu

Paul Kotz, Ph.D.

Ed.D. in Leadership - Core Associate Professor

Brother Louis Hall, BLH202

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5130

pkotz@smumn.edu

Patrick McKee, M.B.A.

MA in Management - Adjunct Associate Professor

(507) 293-3765

pmckee@smumn.edu

Katrina Neckuty-Fodness, M.A.

Management - Adjunct Assistant Professor

Chandrasekhar Papisetty

MA in Management - Adjunct Instructor

(763) 202-0619

cpapiset@smumn.edu

Christina Pierre, Ed.D.

Master of Management Program - Adjunct Instructor

(651) 407-7600 x 1073

ckpier04@smumn.edu

Eric Reeve, M.B.A.

Arts & Cultural Management Program - Adjunct Instructor

Annette Scotti, M.A.

Human Resource Management - Adjunct Program Instructor

Vincent Trovato, M.B.A.

MA in Management - Adjunct Instructor

(651) 999-8984

vtrovato@smumn.edu

Kristin Tupa, M.B.A.

MIB - Adjunct Program Instructor

Alex Urquhart, B.A.

Writing Center - Consultant

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH128

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5101

aurquhar@smumn.edu

Chester VanBlaricum, M.B.A.

MA in Human Development Program - Adjunct Instructor

Donald Wodek, J.D.

MA in Management - Adjunct Assistant Professor

Rustin Wolfe, Ph.D.

Ed.D. in Leadership Program - Core Professor

Brother Louis Hall, BLH222

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5182

rwolfe@smumn.edu

Rustin Wolfe Ph.D.