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M.A. in Philanthropy and Development

Today’s development leaders need to be well-equipped to provide strategic direction in a number of arenas—everything from fund development and board governance to navigating ethical and legal issues and understanding the organization.

While learning alongside your peers and receiving instruction from industry professionals, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota’s application-oriented Master of Arts in Philanthropy and Development program will provide you with the skills you need to help your organization meet its stated objectives.

The unique concentrated learning structure of the Saint Mary’s M.A. in Philanthropy and Development curriculum revolves around three intensive 6-day summer residencies in Winona, Minnesota. Between residencies, students take online courses along with a cohort. This innovative, flexible, and supportive learning environment creates a team-based learning community. Our students are development professionals from all over North America working in various industries.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition for the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program follows a per-credit structure. Due to the unique residency format of the program, a room and board fee applies. The fee includes a room with a private bath, meals, snacks, closing banquet, and access to university services. Students are billed only for meals they eat in the cafeteria during residency.

Scholarship Opportunities

Your work in the nonprofit space is tremendously valued. Saint Mary’s is pleased to offer three scholarship opportunities available only to students studying in the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program.

All scholarship applicants must complete the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development Common Scholarship Form.

This is an endowed scholarship established through the generosity of alumni of the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program.

Eligibility Requirements
  • Admitted to the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program at Saint Mary's
  • Demonstrated financial need
Awards
  • One or more annual awards may be made
  • The annual award amount will be determined in accordance with the applied endowment income distribution policy in effect at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Selection
  • An internal committee will select the recipient(s)
  • Deadline for application is May 1 prior to the summer session
Scholarship Renewal
  • The scholarship is not automatically renewed—an annual application is required
  • Students applying for scholarship renewal must be making satisfactory academic progress in the program (3.0 GPA or higher)
  • To apply for the Philanthropy and Development Alumni Scholarship, please use the common scholarship application provided above

If you receive scholarship money, we will provide your name and contact information to our Development Office so they can share this information with the donor.

(Formerly the Metanoia Scholarship)

This award was established by Tim Burchill, founding president of The Metanoia Group. The Metanoia Group, founded in 1989, provided service to nonprofit organizations, mainly those with a religious affiliation. These services included consulting across a broad spectrum of activities, including development, strategic planning, fundraising, mission and vision development, and public relations.

Tim Burchill created this need-based scholarship to encourage graduate students to pursue an advanced degree in Philanthropy and Development at Saint Mary's. Tim co-founded the Master of Arts program in Philanthropy and Development at Saint Mary's and taught in the program from its inception until the time of his death in February 2007. The scholarship was renamed in Tim's honor and memory upon his death. The scholarship currently awards nearly $7,000 annually to one or more graduate students.

Eligibility Requirements
  • Admitted to the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program at Saint Mary's
  • Demonstrated financial need
Awards
  • One or more annual awards may be made
  • The annual award amount will be determined in accordance with the applied endowment income distribution policy in effect at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota
Selection
  • An internal committee will select the recipient(s)
  • Deadline for application is May 1 prior to the summer session
Scholarship Renewal
  • The scholarship is not automatically renewed—an annual application is required
  • Students applying for scholarship renewal must be making satisfactory academic progress in the program (3.0 GPA or higher)
  • To apply for the Tim Burchill Scholarship, please use the common scholarship application provided above

If you receive scholarship money, we will provide your name and contact information to our Development Office so they can share this information with the donor.

Walter and Mary Ann Riebenack, parents of a program alumnus, funded this endowed scholarship to benefit students in the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program at Saint Mary's.

Eligibility Requirements
  • Admitted to the M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program at Saint Mary’s
  • Demonstrated financial need
  • Preferences (in order of priority)
    • Current resident of New York City
    • Someone who attended both elementary school and secondary school in New York City
    • Resident of Fort Wayne, Indiana
    • Other qualified student
Awards
  • One or more annual awards may be made
Selection
  • An internal committee will select the recipient(s)
  • Deadline for application is May 1 prior to the summer session
Scholarship Renewal
  • The scholarship is not automatically renewed—an annual application is required
  • Students applying for scholarship renewal must be making satisfactory academic progress in the program (3.0 GPA or higher)
  • To apply for the F. Walter and Mary Ann Riebenack Scholarship, please use the common scholarship application provided above

If you receive scholarship money we will provide your name and contact information to our Development Office so they can share this information with the donor.

From Start to Finish

  • You can earn your M.A. in Philanthropy and Development degree in 26 months.
  • Cohorts begin every summer. Apply today.

Locations

This program is offered at our Winona location.

Degree Requirements

First Year: Semester I (Summer Residency)

PHDE607 Introduction to Philanthropy and Development: Frameworks for Thinking and Learning (2 cr.)

This course examines two areas key to the work of today's development professional. The first is an understanding of the historical contexts, traditions, and roles of philanthropy and development that continue to shape the field. The second is an exploration of critical thinking: raising vital questions, gathering and assessing relevant information in an open minded manner, and creating well-reasoned solutions.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Distinguish philanthropy from development.
  2. Analyze the social and faith-tradition contexts that influence philanthropy.
  3. Evaluate historical practices and their influence on today's development approaches.
  4. Develop a personal philanthropic vision.
  5. Apply critical thinking skills.
  6. Develop well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, based on relevant criteria, standards, and multiple perspectives.
  7. Communicate effectively with others in figuring out solutions to complex problems.

PHDE616 Leadership Skills (2 cr.)

This course focuses on leadership needs in the nonprofit sector and explores how it shapes an organization's philanthropic culture. The course also covers styles of leadership and the ways in which outcomes are influenced through increased awareness of personal approach, values, and skills.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compare various leadership styles and approaches.
  2. Identify how personal style and values influence leadership action.
  3. Evaluate one’s own strengths, style, and development needs as a leader.
  4. Analyze the dynamics of team building, joint problem solving, and shared leadership.
  5. Develop a personal framework for authentic leadership action.
  6. Analyze the relationship between leadership and nonprofit organizational culture.
     

PHDE641 Critical Thinking (1 cr.)

This course introduces thinking at the graduate level. Critical and creative thinking are discussed. Learners begin the process of searching and evaluating professional scholarly literature. Research methodology is introduced. The capstone in the degree is explained.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify areas in development for further research
  2. Locate and evaluate appropriate resources for their tasks.
  3. Evaluate their own ability to think creatively, critically, and on a scholarly level.
  4. Develop a research question.

First Year: Semester II (Fall)

PHDE628 Resource Management (2 cr.)

This course prepares development professionals to manage and integrate financial, human, and technology resources. The course covers budgeting and financial management, development and management of personnel, and alignment of technology with the needs of the organization

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Create a budget.
  2. Analyze financial statements and audits.
  3. Articulate distinct individual work styles.
  4. Develop strategies for team building.
  5. Evaluate how technology can best serve the development process and manage data.
  6. Analyze and articulate the relationship between financial, personnel, and technology resources.

PHDE642 Communication Skills (2 cr.)

This course focuses on written and oral communications in professional and academic settings. Theories of interpersonal and organizational communication, appropriate writing style based on audience APA academic voice and style, literature searches, writing that incorporates sources, materials, ethical use of source materials, and effective presentations are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of patterns of organizational and interpersonal communication.
  2. Select the appropriate format, style, tone, and voice for their audience and purpose.
  3. Identify the importance of the various interpersonal skills in professional interactions and communications.
  4. Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate scholarly and professional articles.
  5. Incorporate source material into his or her writing, including correct use of summary, paraphrase, and quotation, along with proper documentation of those materials.
  6. Write with proper academic style, language, and tone.

First Year: Semester III (Spring)

PHDE612 Legal Issues in Philanthropy and Development (1 cr.)

This course explores relevant legal issues for development professionals working in nonprofit organizations.  The focus of the course is the regulation of nonprofit organizations by national, state, provincial, and local governments, tax-exempt status, reporting requirements and strategies to adhere to the principles of accountability legislation.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate foundational concepts and principles related to nonprofit law.
  2. Identify and analyze the operational implications of tax-exempt status.
  3. Apply foundational legal concepts and reporting requirements in leading nonprofit organizations.
  4. Analyze and apply the legal ramifications of accountability legislation on organizations.
     

PHDE643 Synthesizing Seminar 1 (2 cr.)

In this course, students reflect on their learning in the program. Constructs of self-directed learning are discussed, especially the role of curiosity in life-learning. Continuing progress is made on the capstone paper.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explore the role of curiosity in lifelong learning.
  2. Reflect on their learning so far, examining how the learning is influencing their skills of self-directed learning.
  3. Finalize a research question, and synthesize targeted scholarly resources related to the research question.
     

PHDE645 Emerging Issues in Philanthropy and Development (1 cr.)

This course explores trends in philanthropy and the field of development, as identified n professional literature and practice. The emphasis is on analyzing and evaluating trends to maximize donor-organization relationships, improve professional efficiency and effectiveness, and advance the field.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Access and evaluate scholarly and professional literature for ongoing assessment of development practices.
  2. Articulate current issues and related questions and problems.
  3. Assess the assumptions, implications, and practical consequences of current trends on the profession.
  4. Leverage designing new trends and application that meet relevant standards and criteria to improve practice.
     

Second Year: Semester I (Summer Residency)

PHDE611 Ethics in Philanthropy and Development (1 cr.)

This course examines several ways of understanding the role of ethics and values in the lives of philanthropic professionals and leaders. The Code of Ethical Principles and Standards and the Donor Bill of Rights are used to explore a values-based approach to leadership and management of philanthropic fundraising programs.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Distinguish ethics from the law and cultural/social conventions.
  2. Apply a values-based approach to leading and managing philanthropic and fund development programs.
  3. Articulate the underlying values that motivate donors.
  4. Develop a personal ethical framework.
  5. Analyze and apply a code of ethics in decision making.
     

PHDE622 Fund Development Frameworks (2 cr.)

This course covers the basic components of a fund development program, provides the framework for developing an integrated development program, and examines the infrastructure necessary to support development efforts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define and explain the key foundational concepts of development
  2. Understand the importance of a comprehensive development program
  3. Develop skills to create and execute a development plan
     

PHDE624 Board Governance (2 cr.)

This course focuses on the complexities of board governance and the scope of board participation in fund development. The course explores the board's legal and fiduciary responsibilities, and recruiting, motivating, and developing an effective board.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess the value of board volunteers to an organization.
  2. Compare and contrast the roles of board members, development professionals, and CEOs in fund development.
  3. Define the development professional’s role in fund development volunteer management.
  4. Create processes and plans to develop board members.
  5. Develop strategies to engage board members in advancing the mission of the organization.
  6. Synthesize the principles of governance for enhanced board functioning.
     

Second Year: Semester II (Fall)

PHDE638 Organization Development (2 cr.)

This course focuses on applying organizational development, systems thinking, framing, and organization leadership to the practice of development. This course stresses the interdependence of organizational expertise and effective leadership and the specialized skills and methodologies of development for successful fundraising.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess and utilize basic concepts of organization development.
  2. Apply concepts of systems thinking and organizational learning.
  3. Synthesize and utilize organization development concepts and methodologies within a comprehensive framework of organization leadership.
  4. Apply framing methodology to analyze organization dynamics and issues, and identify points of leverage for organizational change.
  5. Evaluate and create solutions to complex organization issues.
     

PHDE644 Synthesizing Seminar 2 (2 cr.)

In this course, students continue to reflect on their learning. Students discuss issues of self-directed learning and the role of self-reflection in the learning process. Continuing progress is made on the capstone paper.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explore the role of self-reflection in lifelong learning.
  2. Reflect on their learning so far, examining how the learning is influencing their skills of self-directed learning.
  3. Continue to build skills of evaluation of scholarly sources.
  4. Develop a critical analysis and synthesize of literature on a philanthropy and development topic.
     

Second Year: Semester III (Spring)

PHDE613 Globalization of Philanthropy (2 cr.)

This course examines how philanthropy is defined and practiced in other cultures and the implications of communication and information technology on the way grantmakers and individuals practice philanthropy.  Specific attention is given to the development of cross-cultural competence and its application to philanthropy and development.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate how globalization affects philanthropy.
  2. Evaluate the ethical and moral focuses of philanthropy in a globalized world.
  3. Evaluate and apply a cultural competency model to philanthropy.
  4. Formulate ethical and market-based rationales to advance cross-cultural philanthropic strategies in a nonprofit organization.
  5. Apply cross-cultural philanthropic competencies across various types of nonprofit organizations as well as ethnic and other demographic groups.
  6. Develop a framework of practice that consciously applies diversity principles.

 

PHDE646 Strategic Planning 1 (1 cr.)

This course begins exploration of organizational planning with an emphasis on strategic planning. The course defines the appropriate use of strategic planning and strategies to create an effective strategic planning team. Students also apply the initial data-gathering strategic planning steps to a nonprofit organization of their choice.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate the role of planning in a nonprofit organization.
  2. Create, orient, and manage an effective strategic planning team.
  3. Implement the data-gathering and critical issue identification steps in a strategic planning process.
     

Third Year: Semester I (Summer Residency)

PHDE634 Major Giving (2 cr.)

This course provides an overview of major and capital gift fundraising, including the design, planning, and implementation of a major gifts program for nonprofit institutions. The course focuses on developing an effective case for support, establishing the major gifts program, developing a donor stewardship program, and "making the request."

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define the key elements of major gift fund development – including special gift and capital campaigns.
  2. Develop the case for support for a nonprofit organization.
  3. Apply major gift prospect management and relationship management techniques.
  4. Analyze the major gift process including identifying, cultivating, soliciting and stewarding gifts.
     

PHDE647 Strategic Planning 2 (1 cr.)

This course builds on PHDE646 with an emphasis on completing the strategic planning process. The course also focuses on ethical consideration and the role of the development professional in strategic planning.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

1. Implement the visioning goal/objective setting, evaluation and plan dissemination steps in the strategic planning process.
2. Articulate and incorporate ethical consideration in planning.
3. Identify the appropriate role of the development professional in strategic planning.
4. Evaluate and align organizational resources with the outcomes of strategic planning.
 

PHDE648 The Practitioner as Self-Directed Learner (2 cr.)

This course is a final opportunity to discuss lifelong learning. The students’ capstones are used as a model to identify and integrate a variety of lifelong learning skills. Students reflect on their learning throughout the program. Students assess their motivation, skills, and critical uncertainties as they plan to be a lifelong, self-directed learner.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Reflect on critical learnings from the program.
  2. Define key attributes that will help navigate future uncertainty and complexity.
  3. Identify attributes and dispositions that will facilitate career success in future workplaces.
  4. Explore personal leadership skills, attributes, and dispositions, reflecting on strengths, challenges, and potentials.
  5. Explore how to make organizational problem-solving more creative and effective.
  6. Evaluate skills and create plans for future lifelong learning.
     



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Austin Pippin

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Business and Technology

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH114

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5198

apippin@smumn.edu

Austin Pippin