Teach college in the schools

Enroll in Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota’s fully online courses today to teach Concurrent Enrollment in schools.

Our CES 18 in English and Math is designed to give teachers the necessary credits to teach college within the schools, while also offering the opportunity to continue towards your master’s degree in education.

Our English coursework is designed to enhance your understanding of how language, critical perspective, and cultural situation impact the composition and analysis of texts.

Our Math coursework focuses on developing the processes of logical thought, critical analysis and communication as they are used in mathematics and in the application of mathematics to problem solving.

With our program you may choose to:

  • complete some or all of the 18 credits you need in order to satisfy requirements to teach college-level coursework 
  • complete an additional 18 credits to earn a Master of Arts in Education with English or Math Specialization 

Delivery Model

All coursework is offered fully online. For those looking to complete the full master’s degree, core coursework will be offered when minimum enrollment numbers are reached.

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Apply Online

  • Once you have created a username and password fill out the Graduate Application for M.A. in Education.
  • If you are NOT seeking the full master’s degree, indicate that you are applying as a "Non-Degree Seeking" student.
  • Our admission staff will follow up with you regarding submission of additional application documents and to answer your questions.

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes!  This content coursework is graduate level and is designed for individuals who are seeking to satisfy the requirements set forth by the Higher Learning Commission, which requires teachers of college-level coursework in secondary schools and two-year colleges to have completed 18 graduate-level credits of coursework in the content area they are looking to teach. You may take any or all of the 18 credits of graduate-level content coursework needed to fulfill this requirement.

Each 3-credit course is $440 per credit.

Instructors in our Program for Advanced College Credit (PACC) are eligible for a 30% discount.  This discount is only applied to the content-specific coursework and does not apply to the final 18 credits taken toward completing the master’s degree.

Financial aid is available for those who are seeking the master’s degree. For individuals seeking only 18 credits (or less), we encourage you to check with your school/district regarding assistance or look into personal education loan options via your financial institution.

No, you may take as many or as few of the courses that you need.  Keep in mind that individuals who do not plan to complete the master’s degree are not eligible for governmental financial aid.

These courses are geared toward anyone working with youth and/or looking for more in-depth content knowledge (and perhaps a masters degree).  You do NOT have to be a licensed educator to take these courses. 

Yes! Since the coursework is offered entirely online, you can complete these classes from anywhere.

All faculty teaching content-specific coursework hold a doctoral degree in the content area. Faculty for the master’s completion courses are practicing educators and administrators with advanced academic preparation and significant professional experience in the area of curriculum and instruction.

That depends on each individual and also on enrollment numbers, which determine course offerings. We're excited to help you achieve your goals. In fact, we'd love to talk with you about your personal timeline.

Additional content areas are in development. Please contact us to talk through the content courses you hope to see offered.


Courses Offered/Degree Requirements

See information below for course descriptions (non-degree seeking students) and program outcomes (degree-seeking students).

E600 Ways of Reading (3 cr.)
E605 The Text in Focus (3 cr.)
E610 Authors and Authorship (3 cr.)
E615 Literature in English from Around the Globe (3 cr.)
E620 Literatures of the United States (3 cr.)
E625 Ways of Writing (3 cr.)


E600 Ways of Reading (3 cr.)
In this course students examine the role of the reader in literary interpretation. The course considers how diverse audience perspectives as well as the application of theoretical and other critical lenses help construct the life of the text.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate key concepts in literary and cultural theory;
  2. Analyze how individual readings reflect and/or challenge theoretical assumptions about language and literature;
  3. Reconstruct the critical conversation surrounding a work; and
  4. Contribute a critical reading that is effectively situated within an existing critical conversation.

E605 The Text in Focus (3 cr.)

In this course students examine how primary texts can be said to generate their own meaning. Particular attention is given to formal qualities, the relationship between literary elements and the text as a whole, classification by genre, and a text’s incorporation of other texts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and analyze formal qualities of texts;
  2. Analyze how individual literary elements contribute to the possible meanings of a text;
  3. Assess texts as representative of a genre/genres;
  4. Analyze intertextual strategies among texts;
  5. Employ effective literary discourse in original, organized, and sophisticated essays that defend a literary thesis with textual evidence; and
  6. Consult and incorporate appropriate secondary sources in support of literary claims.

E610 Authors and Authorship (3 cr.)

In this course students examine the significance of the author in one’s interpretation of texts. The course explores a variety of potential authorial functions, such as writer of a body of work, spokesperson of a culture, member of a particular tradition or movement, and arbiter of the text’s meaning.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the import of an author’s biography to the meaning of a text;
  2. Analyze examples of authorial self-construction (narrative voice, intrusion of the author as a character, the author as “divine” architect, the incorporation of author figures or other artists within a text, etc.);
  3. Draw connections between an author’s work and traditions or movements with which the author is identified; and
  4. Consider how an author’s larger body of work affects the meaning of an individual text.

E615 Literature in English from Around the Globe (3 cr.)

In this course students explore texts that attest to the richness and variety of literature composed in English. Texts from within and beyond the British Isles are examined individually and in relation to each other, especially with regard to Britain’s colonial history and the globalization of the English language.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze important elements of literary texts written in English, especially within their broader social, political, and cultural histories;
  2. Evaluate the possibilities and implications of the English language as a vehicle for literary expression;
  3. Employ effective literary discourse in original, organized, and sophisticated essays that defend a literary thesis with textual evidence;
  4. Consult and incorporate appropriate secondary sources in support of literary claims; and
  5. Evaluate the suitability of various literary works for different pedagogical purposes.

E620 Literatures of the United States (3 cr.)

In this course students explore various voices and literary practices that have contributed to narratives of American culture and identity. With particular attention paid to the perspectives of neglected or marginalized groups, canonical and non-canonical texts are put in conversation with each other.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze important elements of literary practices and traditions in the United States, especially within a broader social, political, and cultural history;
  2. Employ effective literary discourse in original, organized, and sophisticated essays that defend a literary thesis with textual evidence;
  3. Consult and incorporate appropriate secondary sources in support of literary claims; and
  4. Evaluate the suitability of various literary works for different pedagogical purposes.

E625 Ways of Writing (3 cr.)

In this course students explore various writing genres through examination of representative primary texts and through practice in composing original works. Elements such as audience, rhetorical situation, and voice are highlighted.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the rhetorical techniques of professional/creative genres through close critical reading;
  2. Write original works that demonstrate competent use of professional discourse and/or creative conventions;
  3. Articulate rhetorical/stylistic insights in class discussions or workshops;
  4. Consult and incorporate appropriate sources in the service of original composition; and
  5. Evaluate the suitability of various genres and forms for different rhetorical purposes.

Recommended Course Sequence
M600 Advanced Calculus (3 cr.)
M605 Matrix Theory (3 cr.)
M610 Complex Analysis (3 cr.)
M615 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 cr.)
M620 Geometry (3 cr.)
M625 Probability (3 cr.)

M600 Advanced Calculus (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal exploration of elementary topology of both R and Rn, differentiability and Riemann integrability of functions in R and Rn, infinite series of real numbers, sequences of functions, and uniform convergence.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define convergence, continuity, differentiability, and Riemann integrability in R and Rn, and uniform convergence of sequences, series, and functions. (1.c)
  2. Determine and prove convergence or divergence of sequences in R and Rn, series in R, and sequences and series of functions. (2.d)
  3. Evaluate derivatives and Riemann integrals in R and Rn. (4.a)
  4. Prove theorems about differentiability and Riemann integrability in R and Rn. (2.c)

M605 Matrix Theory (3 cr.)
This course provides an introduction to abstract vector spaces and linear transformations including: basis and dimension, inner product spaces, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, matrices, and canonical forms.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compute basis and dimension of vector spaces, and determinants of matrices. (3.c)
  2. Apply theory and techniques to answer questions about eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (3.a)
  3. Determine canonical forms and factorizations of matrices. (1.b)
  4. Prove theorems about eigenvalues, eigenvectors, canonical forms, factorizations, and inner products. (4.c)

M610 Complex Analysis (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal exploration of functions of a complex variable, including analytic functions, contour integrals, residues, and power series.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define analytic functions, contour integrals, residues, and power series. (1.c)
  2. Evaluate complex functions, derivatives, integrals, and series. (1.a)
  3. Derive series expansions for complex-valued functions. (2.d)
  4. Prove theorems about limits, derivatives, integrals, series, residues, and poles. (4.c)

M615 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 cr.)
This course provides an introduction to combinatorics and graph theory including: the Pigeonhole Principle, generating functions, permutations, combinations, principle of inclusion-exclusion, recurrence relations, Ramsey theory, graphs and directed graphs, paths, and trees, graph coloring.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply counting techniques including permutations, combinations, the Pigeonhole Principle, and the principle of inclusion-exclusion to solve a variety of problems. (3.c)
  2. Construct and use generating functions to solve problems, including recurrence relations. (3.b)
  3. Use graphs and directed graphs to model given situations. (3.d)
  4. Prove and present theorems using combinatorial and graph theoretic techniques. (4.b)

M620 Geometry (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal comparison of non-Euclidean geometry with Euclidean geometry. Advanced Euclidean geometry results concerning concurrency, collinearity, cyclic quadrilaterals, equicircles, and the nine-point circle are discussed.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe axiom sets for geometry. (2.a)
  2. Compare and contrast neutral, Euclidean, hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometries. (1.b)
  3. Analyze and critique proofs regarding advanced Euclidean results. (2.b)
  4. Prove and present theorems from hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometries. (4.d)

M625 Probability (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal exploration of the modern theory of probability including Markov chains, generating functions, discrete/continuous probability distributions, expectation, random variables, conditional probability, independence, joint distributions.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify appropriate probability distributions, including joint distributions, to model given situations. (3.d)
  2. Find and use moment generating functions to answer questions about random variables. (3.b)
  3. Calculate conditional probability and conditional expectation. (3.a)
  4. Define and use Markov chains to answer questions about expectations and probability. (3.e)
Specialization Courses: 18 cr.

Program Description

The English Specialization for the Masters of Arts in Education is designed to enhance learners’
understanding of the ways in which language, critical perspective, and cultural situation impact
the composition and analysis of texts. The program offers students an advanced engagement
with the key elements in the study of English: author, reader, text, and context. Each of the six
courses in the program responds to the needs of secondary teachers and two-year college
instructors seeking additional expertise within the discipline of English, as well as those who
hold a B.A. in English and are interested in graduate study.

Course Sequence

E600 Ways of Reading (3 cr.)
E605 The Text in Focus (3 cr.)
E610 Authors and Authorship (3 cr.)
E615 Literature in English from Around the Globe (3 cr.)
E620 Literatures of the United States (3 cr.)
E625 Ways of Writing (3 cr.)


Core Courses: 18 cr.
EDMA600 Orientation Session (0 cr.)
EDMA603 Summative Presentation (0 cr.)
EDMA604 Reflection and Resiliency (3 cr.)
EDMA610 Child Growth and Development (3 cr.)
EDMA630 Educational Research (3 cr.)
EDMA632 Ethics and Law (3 cr.)
EDMA634 Action Research Project (3 cr.)
EDMA637 Integrating Technology in the Curriculum (3 cr.)

Program Outcomes and Indicators

  1. Articulate how cultural context relates to the reading and writing of texts.
    • Analyze the social, historical, and/or cultural conditions in which literary texts have been produced and/or are now read.
    • Distinguish historical literary periods by making references to and connections among major figures, works, and movements.
    • Derive meaning from a text on the basis of biographical, historical, and/or cultural contexts.
  2. Discern the values embedded in the literatures of diverse cultures and peoples.
    • Draw connections that indicate how individual authors and works fit into a larger cultural landscape.
    • Demonstrate sensitivity to cultural values and the various ways these are encoded
    • in language.
    • Situate one’s own reading in a range of possible interpretations of texts emerging
    • from divergent perspectives.
    • Recognize the ethical imperative to cultivate respect for our own cultures and the
    • cultures we study.
  3. Apply literary theoretical and critical strategies to gain various interpretive insights into texts, including those frequently encountered in secondary and/or college teaching.
    • Use major concepts of literary theory and criticism in interpretations of texts.
    • Derive meaning from texts on the basis of different critical perspectives.
    • Formulate and defend a thesis statement about a literary work through close textual analysis.
    • Distinguish various ways of categorizing texts (geographical origin, author/oeuvre, genre, etc.).
    • Evaluate the suitability of readings for a variety of teaching contexts.
  4. Analyze how the evolution and usage of the English language affects the composition and interpretation of texts.
    • Identify linguistic features in a close reading.
    • Analyze how formal features contribute to the meaning of a text.
    • Evaluate language choices within various context.
  5. Evaluate the characteristics of and engage in a variety of writing genres.
    • Compose documents that demonstrate awareness of rhetorical situation, genre,
    • audience, purpose, and context.
    • Employ appropriate disciplinary and professional discourse in writing.

 

Program Description

he Mathematics Specialization for the Masters of Arts in Education is designed to expose learners to advanced concepts in six different mathematical areas. The program focuses on developing the processes of logical thought, critical analysis and communication as they are used in mathematics and in the application of mathematics to problem solving. Each of the six courses in the program responds to the needs of secondary teachers and two-year college instructors seeking additional expertise within the discipline of mathematics, as well as those who hold a four-year degree in mathematics and are interested in graduate study.

Program Outcomes and Indicators

  1. Construct a conceptual framework for understanding mathematical ideas.
    • Develop an advanced comprehension of mathematical concepts, operations, and relations.
    • Make connections among areas of mathematics.
    • Formulate precise definitions for mathematical constructs.
  2. Develop logical thought and critical analysis as habits of mind.
    • Apply logical reasoning in mathematical contexts.
    • Critique mathematical proofs.
    • Construct mathematical proofs.
    • Exhibit standards of mathematical rigor.
  3. Apply mathematical theory and techniques to analyze and solve problems.
    • Use appropriate technology to support analysis and problem solving.
    • Perform appropriate mathematical computations correctly to solve problems.
    • Demonstrate accuracy in computational work.
    • Translate real-world problems into mathematical models.
    • Apply mathematics to models derived from real-world problems.
  4. Communicate about and with mathematics.
    • Write mathematics clearly and correctly with proper notation and terminology.
    • Discuss or present mathematical ideas verbally.
    • Communicate one’s own mathematical work clearly in a manner appropriate to the level of the audience.
    • Present existing mathematics in an expository and non-rigorous manner.

Recommended Course Sequence

M600 Advanced Calculus (3 cr.)
M605 Matrix Theory (3 cr.)
M610 Complex Analysis (3 cr.)
M615 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 cr.)
M620 Geometry (3 cr.)
M625 Probability (3 cr.)

M600 Advanced Calculus (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal exploration of elementary topology of both R and Rn, differentiability and Riemann integrability of functions in R and Rn, infinite series of real numbers, sequences of functions, and uniform convergence.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define convergence, continuity, differentiability, and Riemann integrability in R and Rn, and uniform convergence of sequences, series, and functions. (1.c)
  2. Determine and prove convergence or divergence of sequences in R and Rn, series in R, and sequences and series of functions. (2.d)
  3. Evaluate derivatives and Riemann integrals in R and Rn. (4.a)
  4. Prove theorems about differentiability and Riemann integrability in R and Rn. (2.c)

M605 Matrix Theory (3 cr.)
This course provides an introduction to abstract vector spaces and linear transformations including: basis and dimension, inner product spaces, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, matrices, and canonical forms.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compute basis and dimension of vector spaces, and determinants of matrices. (3.c)
  2. Apply theory and techniques to answer questions about eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (3.a)
  3. Determine canonical forms and factorizations of matrices. (1.b)
  4. Prove theorems about eigenvalues, eigenvectors, canonical forms, factorizations, and inner products. (4.c)

M610 Complex Analysis (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal exploration of functions of a complex variable, including analytic functions, contour integrals, residues, and power series.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define analytic functions, contour integrals, residues, and power series. (1.c)
  2. Evaluate complex functions, derivatives, integrals, and series. (1.a)
  3. Derive series expansions for complex-valued functions. (2.d)
  4. Prove theorems about limits, derivatives, integrals, series, residues, and poles. (4.c)

M615 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 cr.)
This course provides an introduction to combinatorics and graph theory including: the Pigeonhole Principle, generating functions, permutations, combinations, principle of inclusion-exclusion, recurrence relations, Ramsey theory, graphs and directed graphs, paths, and trees, graph coloring.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply counting techniques including permutations, combinations, the Pigeonhole Principle, and the principle of inclusion-exclusion to solve a variety of problems. (3.c)
  2. Construct and use generating functions to solve problems, including recurrence relations. (3.b)
  3. Use graphs and directed graphs to model given situations. (3.d)
  4. Prove and present theorems using combinatorial and graph theoretic techniques. (4.b)

M620 Geometry (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal comparison of non-Euclidean geometry with Euclidean geometry. Advanced Euclidean geometry results concerning concurrency, collinearity, cyclic quadrilaterals, equicircles, and the nine-point circle are discussed.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe axiom sets for geometry. (2.a)
  2. Compare and contrast neutral, Euclidean, hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometries. (1.b)
  3. Analyze and critique proofs regarding advanced Euclidean results. (2.b)
  4. Prove and present theorems from hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometries. (4.d)


M625 Probability (3 cr.)
This course provides a formal exploration of the modern theory of probability including Markov chains, generating functions, discrete/continuous probability distributions, expectation, random variables, conditional probability, independence, joint distributions.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify appropriate probability distributions, including joint distributions, to model given situations. (3.d)
  2. Find and use moment generating functions to answer questions about random variables. (3.b)
  3. Calculate conditional probability and conditional expectation. (3.a)
  4. Define and use Markov chains to answer questions about expectations and probability. (3.e)

Connect With Us

Michelle Dougherty, M.A.

SGPP Admission - Assistant Director of Admission

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH112

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5122

mdougher@smumn.edu