Student reading to other students

Prepare for Your K–12 Reading Teacher License

Are you looking to help students who are stuck in one place with their literacy skills? This program will help you improve students foundational literacy skills even while teaching content courses. 

Licensure Preparation

If you are a licensed educator, you can enroll in our 17 credit (seven courses) Graduate Certificate in K–12 Reading Teacher program to prepare for the K–12 Reading license in Minnesota or the 316 Reading Teacher license in Wisconsin. 

Once you have finished the licensure preparation as a K–12 Reading Teacher, you may continue on to complete 17 additional credits (seven courses) to earn the Master of Arts in Literacy Education. If you direct or coordinate reading programs, you will benefit from completing this degree. Minnesota candidates become Reading Leaders, and Wisconsin candidates become Reading Specialists, once portfolio and other licensure requirements are met.

What You'll Gain

Consistent with the mission of Saint Mary's University of Minnesota and the Board of Teaching requirements for licensure as a reading specialist, the M.A. in Literacy Education/K–12 Reading Teacher expects its graduates to be able to do the following:

  • Understand the reading process and the process of learning to read, and design developmentally appropriate instruction that advances students' reading proficiency and encourages them to read
  • Understand how to assess the reading development of individual students and groups of students, how to use assessment data to design appropriate reading curriculum and instruction based on the assessment data, and how to communicate this information to relevant audiences
  • Know how to integrate knowledge of reading with the teacher's understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional and instructional development and leadership
     


After six of Tantanka's teachers finished coursework at Saint Mary's in Literacy Education, they can now use the same terminology and strategies to help readers improve from one grade to the next.


Program graduates and their students talk about the changes they saw in the year following the completion of the program.

Gainful Employment

Effective July 1, 2011, the U.S. Department of Education requires institutions with nondegree programs defined as “Gainful Employment programs” to disclose certain information about these programs. Read the report.

From Start to Finish

  • Prepare for your K–12 Reading Teacher license in as little as 18 months.
  • Complete the M.A. in Literacy Education plus the K–12 Reading Teacher license preparation in two and a half years.
  • To apply, you'll need to submit an application, $25 application fee, résumé, brief personal statement outlining your professional and educational goals, official transcripts, and letters of reference. For more information, visit the graduate admission page.

Apply Today

Locations

Preparation for the K–12 Reading Teacher license is offered at our Twin Cities location and regional cohorts in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Upon completion of the licensure preparation you may continue on to finish the M.A. in Literacy Education at the Twin Cities Campus.

Degree Requirements

Required Courses: 17 cr.

EDRD601 Elementary Reading Instruction: K-6 (2 cr.)

Drawing on the conceptual framework for understanding literacy processes, stages, and major instructional approaches developed in EDRD600, this course features instructional techniques, materials, and programs that have been validated as effective for developing competent and joyful readers and writers in grades K-6. The focus is on creating a balanced literacy program that incorporates the strengths of a whole language approach and the findings of the National Reading Panel.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:


A. A teacher of reading must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes and instruction:
(7) teach and foster emergent reading skills such as phonemic awareness, alphabet recognition, and understanding that printed words convey meaning;
(8) teach and foster word recognition skills including phonics, structural analysis, and contextual analysis;
(9) foster the development of an initial sight vocabulary and an increasingly larger and more complex vocabulary, mastering word-learning strategies such as the use of context and structural analysis, and developing word consciousness;
(10) teach and foster fluency and automaticity in both oral and silent reading;
(11) teach and foster comprehension and appreciation of a wide range of children's and adolescent literature;
(14) teach writing to advance reading development and learning from text.

B. A teacher of reading must be able to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction:
(1) organize and manage effective reading instruction appropriate across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds;
(2) implement a variety of appropriate grouping strategies including individual, small group, and whole group reading instruction;

D. A teacher of reading must be able to create a literate environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use assessments including:
(3) develop and implement classroom and school-wide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum.
(5) create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment that promotes ongoing student engagement and literacy for all students.
 

EDRD602 Secondary Reading Instruction: 7-12 (2 cr.)

This course focuses on literacy development in the middle and high school years, with the goal of promoting reading for learning, understanding, and enjoyment. Topics include assessment of students' reading and written language skills, the cognitive and skill levels required by various content-area materials and written tests, use of alternative testing strategies, and instructional strategies for developing strategic readers and competent writers in all content areas. Collaboration with content area teachers to adapt course materials, teaching strategies, and assessment practices for students with exceptional educational needs such as learning disabilities and gifted/talented are also featured.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

A. A teacher of reading must have knowledge of the foundations of reading processes and instruction:
(12) teach comprehension strategies such as adjusting reading approach, activating background knowledge, summarizing, generating questions, constructing mental representations, and self-monitoring;
(13) teach and foster critical thinking skills and behaviors such as thinking independently, withholding judgment, recognizing point of view and bias, and considering multiple solutions; and
(14) teach writing to advance reading development and learning from text.

B. A teacher of reading must be able to use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials to support reading instruction:
(1) organize and manage effective reading instruction appropriate across developmental levels, proficiency, and linguistic backgrounds;
(4) understand and apply instructional and informational technologies, digital literacy, and electronic resources to support literacy;
(6) understand the rationale for using a wide range of texts and show evidence of using multiple texts within instruction, including informational texts, content area texts, electronic texts, and nonprint materials;
(7) understand the structures of texts, both print and electronic, and the challenges presented by these materials, and use this knowledge in lesson design to match materials to the cognitive levels of all readers and across the curriculum
 

 

EDRD606 Development and Supervision of K-12 Reading Programs (2 cr.)

This course focuses on the skills needed to design and supervise K-12 reading programs, including selection of curriculum, assessment procedures, instructional materials, and budget development. Interpretation of district results on state-mandated reading tests and development of a district plan are featured. This course also includes coaching strategies for collaboration with classroom and content area teachers.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following.

      C. A teacher of reading must be able to use a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective reading instruction:

(2) select appropriate tools for specific situations that includes assessment for diagnosis and progress monitoring;

(3) demonstrate expertise in the administration and interpretation of a wide variety of measures that track student progress by individual, class, cohort, and school; 5) use assessment data to develop interventions that address specific student needs; and

(7) communicate results of assessments to students, parents, caregivers, colleagues, and administrators.

D. A teacher of reading must be able to create a literate environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments including:

(2) support students and colleagues in the selection of materials, print and electronic, that match students' reading levels, interests, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds;

(3) develop and implement classroom and schoolwide organizational structures that include explicit instruction, guided practice, independent reading, interactive talk, opportunities for response, and reading and writing across the curriculum;

(4) integrate technology into reading instruction to create and maintain an environment that includes conventional and new literacies and ensures equity of access to technology

(5) create and maintain a motivating classroom and school environment that promotes ongoing student engagement and literacy for all students;

(6) promote a shared vision that all students can learn literacy regardless of their cognitive, cultural, or linguistic backgrounds; and

(9) understand the importance of and facilitate home school connections.

E. A teacher of reading must view professional development as a career-long effort and responsibility including:

(1) serve as a role model and display positive attitudes toward literacy in the district/building by engaging in reading and writing practices;

(2) promote and facilitate ongoing self-reflection related to teaching and student learning;

(3) seek to be well informed and share up-to-date knowledge of literacy learning with colleagues;

(4) apply aspects of coaching feedback to instructional practice;

(5) actively seek opportunities to participate in learning communities and professional organizations;

(6) collaborate with and provide guidance for colleagues who seek classroom instruction support in reading; (7 engage in, initiate, implement, and evaluate professional development programs; and

(8) understand current state and federal legislation as it relates to reading.

 

 

ESL/EDRD600 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development (1-3 cr.)

This course explores the theoretical and scientific underpinnings of literacy development as a basis for developing effective K-12 reading programs. Major topics include knowledge of the relationships between spoken and written language, the historical evolution of English, processes of reading, motivational aspects, stages of reading, spelling, and writing development, and major historical and current instructional approaches and programs for literacy development. Qualitative and quantitative research regarding literacy acquisition and applications to designing balanced reading programs are addressed. This course is also an applied introduction to the study of linguistics as it relates to the teaching of English to non-native speakers. It is divided into language as a system (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics), the social factors affecting language acquisition and development, and the relationship of learning English to that of learning other languages.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2, (K)
  2. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K)
  3. Apply basic linguistic concepts. G1, SMU6, (K, A)
  4. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K, A)
  5. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (K)
  6. Summarize the history and development of the English language. G4, SMU6, (K, A)
  7. Apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents. K1, SMU9, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD603 Reading Instruction for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners (1-2 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop literacy programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language, learning, and/or cultural differences. Three major strands are featured: (1) selection and teaching of literature that reflects the diversity of American classrooms and promotes global understanding; (2) fostering literacy in children who come from non-mainstream cultures; and (3) literacy for English Language Learners (ELL/ESL) and for those with special learning characteristics, for example, gifted and talented. Gender differences in literacy acquisition are also explored.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K, A)
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as an important contributor to academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  3. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K)
  4. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (KA)
  5. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom. I3, SMU8, (K)
     

ESL/EDRD604 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to identify and successfully remediate reading and written language difficulties in all struggling readers, including those served in Title One and LD programs, English Language Learners with literacy delays, and competent readers who have lost motivation to read and write. Concepts related to test construction, selection, and administration are explored through a case study approach. Uses of group and individual standardized and informal literacy measurements are featured.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal second language assessment techniques. F1, SMU5, (K, A)
  2. Analyze the limitations of using traditional assessment procedures in the identification and placement of students with limited English proficiency in academic programs, including gifted and special education programs. F2, SMU5, (K, A)
  3. Use second language assessment including item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency. F3, SMU5, (K, A)
  4. Administer, interpret, and explain the results of standardized tests and alternative methods of assessment to students with limited English proficiency, the students' parents, and to colleagues. F4, SMU5, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD605 Clinical Language and Reading Practicum (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the development and practice of competencies for teaching in the elementary and secondary classroom. The three areas of emphasis are 1- planning, implementing, and evaluating learning in the school environment; 2- critical reflection, monitoring, and adjustment of professional practice; and 3- observation and understanding of administrative and instructional policies and procedures.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the second language needs of students with limited English proficiency in a school setting. B2, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to students with limited English proficiency. D4, SMU3, (K, A)
  3. Use a variety of communication techniques, verbal, nonverbal, and multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K, A)
  4. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education. J2, SMU9, (K, A)
  5. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (KA)
     

Transfer Credits

Students may transfer up to 6 graduate credits of Saint Mary's University of Minnesota GPDE continuing education coursework designed to align with Minnesota reading standards into the program.




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Michelle Dougherty, M.A.

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Education

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH112

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5122

mdougher@smumn.edu

Faculty

Katie Hubbard, M.A.

MA in Literacy Program - Program Director

Katie Hubbard M.A.
Cindy Kronebusch

GSOE - Assistant Program Director, M.A. in Literacy

Griffin Hall, GR221

Campus Box: # 23

(507) 457-6637

ckronebu@smumn.edu

Lisa Thorsell

K-12 Reading and M.A. in Literacy - Program Coordinator

Griffin Hall, GR218

Campus Box: # 23

(507) 457-6611

lthorsel@smumn.edu

Lisa Thorsell