ESL teacher helping a student.

Become an ESL Teacher

English as a Second Language (ESL) is perfect for teachers who have a passion for working with K–12 students whose native language is not English.

The Saint Mary's University of Minnesota Master of Arts in English as a Second Language program is a great fit for either established or new teachers. Licensed Minnesota teachers who are seeking to add the Minnesota K–12 ESL license will achieve their professional development and career advancement goals. Adults who have their bachelor’s degree and are seeking a Minnesota teaching license for the first time will earn their licensure while focusing on this specialty.

As with all Saint Mary’s programs, M.A. in ESL courses are taught by top-notch educators who have a wealth of classroom experience to share. Through classroom instruction and collaboration with your peers, you will develop a skill set that will help you better understand languages and cultures and how they impact learning and motivate students in the areas of English reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The entire curriculum is designed to be immediately applied to your classroom and position you as a leader in your school by promoting an educational environment that supports learners of all backgrounds.

Licensure Preparation

Licensure preparation includes a variety of requirements including foundational coursework and field experience/student teaching. 

Foundational Coursework (For Initial Licensure Seekers Only)

Licensure preparation includes one year of foundational coursework pertaining to curriculum design, educational technology, classroom management, instructional techniques, and much more. This coursework lays a solid foundation as you move into the ESL coursework.

Field Experience and Student Teaching

It is critical for you to be able to put theory into practice. Your time in the program includes field experience and student teaching, which ensure that you have practiced your skills under the guidance of a cooperating teacher and university supervisor. Program staff will talk with you further about field experience, student teaching, portfolio, and testing requirements.

Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the M.A. in ESL, graduates are expected to be able to do the following:

  • Employ a variety of methods, techniques, and program models suitable for second language instruction with diverse learners, including adapting existing materials to meet the needs of the students with limited English proficiency
  • Use various content-based methodologies and integrate language acquisition and use of language functions across learning experiences to facilitate full inclusion of students with limited English proficiency in the school setting
  • Communicate successfully with students, parents, colleagues, and community members
  • Develop communication instruction in the second language context, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the curriculum
  • Use formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine student readiness for and appropriate placement in limited English proficiency programs, and to evaluate student progress
  • Analyze the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education
  • Identify the fundamentals of the first and second language acquisition processes and their similarities and differences
  • Interpret how the historical, social, and political aspects of language and cultural patterns in the United States influence second language instruction
  • Integrate an understanding of English as a second language with an understanding of pedagogy, students, learning, classroom management, and professional development

From Start to Finish

  • You can earn your M.A. in ESL degree in two to three years.
  • A cohort model allows for a small team of students to collaborate in convenient locations across the state. Additional online instruction and activities supplement these face-to-face interactions. Cohorts are currently offered in several locations throughout the state.
  • To apply, you'll need to submit an application, $25 application fee, résumé, brief personal statement outlining your professional and educational goals, official transcripts, and letters of reference. For more information, visit the graduate admission page.

Apply Today

Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities and Rochester locations

Degree Requirements

ESL Courses: 28 cr.

ESL601 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)

This course addresses major topics of second language acquisition, including the processes of first and second language acquisition; the similarities and differences among child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition; the developmental progression of students with limited English proficiency; and methods, techniques, and program models for second language instruction.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the processes of first and second language acquisition. H2, SMU7, (K, A)
  2. Compare the similarities and differences among child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition. H1, SMU7, (K, A)
  3. Assess the developmental progression of students within the range of individual variation of students with limited English proficiency in a given learning context. B3, SMU1, (K, A)
  4. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2 (K, A)
  5. Integrate both language learning and subject matter content for student success in an academic setting. C2, SMU2 (K)
  6. Create and apply strategies for second language instruction. SMU1
     

ESL602 Language and Culture (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop cultural understanding of and communication with speakers of other languages. The impact of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences in the classroom is examined. Various strategies to involve non-English speaking families in the school community are considered.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning.
  2. Analyze differing cultural practices and how these differences may affect the way students learn.
  3. Design communication strategies with parents within the larger sociocultural framework of which the school is a part.
  4. Identify how the student's environment, including family circumstances, community systems, and health and economic conditions, may influence learning.
  5. Relate knowledge of English to knowledge of other languages.
  6. Characterize the cultural and social differences reflected in the US's cultural pluralism.
  7. Interpret the sociolinguistic dynamics of the cultures of the United States.
  8. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom.
  9. Connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities.
  10. Involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities.
     

ESL606 Advanced Methods Instruction for English Language Learners (3 cr.)

This course covers historical, recent, and innovative methods, theories, and models of instruction for English language learners. Instructional design approaches for listening, speaking, reading, and writing consider culture, language and educational backgrounds, individual differences, and English level. Emphasis is on teaching English through academic content and collaboration with mainstream staff.

Upon completion of the course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Use multiple forms of instructional approaches to address different learning styles, background experiences, and performance modes of English Language Learners (ELLs). B1, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the needs of ELLs in a K-12 school setting. B2, SMU1, (K)
  3. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to ELLs. D4, SMU3, (K)
  4. Compare the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications of these differences when teaching ELLs. E1, SMU4, (K)
  5. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as important factors in academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  6. Apply a variety of communication techniques when teaching and use verbal, nonverbal, multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K)
  7. Develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of ESL. J3, SMU9, (K)
    h. Apply instructional strategies and materials to achieve student understanding and learning. J3, SMU9, (K) (g and h are one standard split into two objectives)
  8. Align district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning. J4, SMU9, (K, A)
  9. Formulate plans to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities. J4, SMU9, (K)
  10. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (K)
  11. Evaluate research on English language learning.
     

ESL607 School and Community Collaborations for English Language Learners (4 cr.)

This course includes a clinical experience for application of best practices for K-12 education for English language learners, including content-based methodologies, communication skills in curricular and co-curricular learning experiences, and involvement of the community as active partners in creating educational opportunities and programs.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Connect both language learning and subject matter content as essential to student success in an academic setting.
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as important factors in academic success across the curriculum.
  3. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education.
  4. Develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of English as a second language and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding.
  5. Formulate plans to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities.
  6. Create co-curricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.
  7. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models.
     

ESL608 Writing Instruction (4 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop strong writings programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language and/or cultural differences. Major topics include, exploring the history of the English language; strengthening students' use of academic language (including grammar, usage, mechanics, style); writing for varying purposes and audiences across content areas; deepening the understanding of the role of technology in writing; formal and informal assessment of writing.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1.  Understand a variety of methods, techniques, and program models suitable for second language instruction with diverse learners including adapting existing materials to meet the needs of the students with limited English proficiency.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of communication instruction in the second language context and the importance of developing communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the curriculum.
  3. Understand and uses formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine appropriate placement and to evaluate the progress of students with limited English proficiency. The teacher knows and uses criteria for determining the readiness of students to enter and exit limited English proficiency programs.
  4. Understand the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education.

 

ESL/EDRD600 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development (1-3 cr.)

This course explores the theoretical and scientific underpinnings of literacy development as a basis for developing effective K-12 reading programs. Major topics include knowledge of the relationships between spoken and written language, the historical evolution of English, processes of reading, motivational aspects, stages of reading, spelling, and writing development, and major historical and current instructional approaches and programs for literacy development. Qualitative and quantitative research regarding literacy acquisition and applications to designing balanced reading programs are addressed. This course is also an applied introduction to the study of linguistics as it relates to the teaching of English to non-native speakers. It is divided into language as a system (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics), the social factors affecting language acquisition and development, and the relationship of learning English to that of learning other languages.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2, (K)
  2. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K)
  3. Apply basic linguistic concepts. G1, SMU6, (K, A)
  4. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K, A)
  5. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (K)
  6. Summarize the history and development of the English language. G4, SMU6, (K, A)
  7. Apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents. K1, SMU9, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD603 Reading Instruction for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners (1-2 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop literacy programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language, learning, and/or cultural differences. Three major strands are featured: (1) selection and teaching of literature that reflects the diversity of American classrooms and promotes global understanding; (2) fostering literacy in children who come from non-mainstream cultures; and (3) literacy for English Language Learners (ELL/ESL) and for those with special learning characteristics, for example, gifted and talented. Gender differences in literacy acquisition are also explored.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K, A)
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as an important contributor to academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  3. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K)
  4. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (KA)
  5. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom. I3, SMU8, (K)
     

ESL/EDRD604 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to identify and successfully remediate reading and written language difficulties in all struggling readers, including those served in Title One and LD programs, English Language Learners with literacy delays, and competent readers who have lost motivation to read and write. Concepts related to test construction, selection, and administration are explored through a case study approach. Uses of group and individual standardized and informal literacy measurements are featured.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal second language assessment techniques. F1, SMU5, (K, A)
  2. Analyze the limitations of using traditional assessment procedures in the identification and placement of students with limited English proficiency in academic programs, including gifted and special education programs. F2, SMU5, (K, A)
  3. Use second language assessment including item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency. F3, SMU5, (K, A)
  4. Administer, interpret, and explain the results of standardized tests and alternative methods of assessment to students with limited English proficiency, the students' parents, and to colleagues. F4, SMU5, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD605 Clinical Language and Reading Practicum (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the development and practice of competencies for teaching in the elementary and secondary classroom. The three areas of emphasis are 1- planning, implementing, and evaluating learning in the school environment; 2- critical reflection, monitoring, and adjustment of professional practice; and 3- observation and understanding of administrative and instructional policies and procedures.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the second language needs of students with limited English proficiency in a school setting. B2, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to students with limited English proficiency. D4, SMU3, (K, A)
  3. Use a variety of communication techniques, verbal, nonverbal, and multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K, A)
  4. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education. J2, SMU9, (K, A)
  5. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (KA)
     

Degree Requirements

 This degree option is for currently licensed teachers who plan to seek Minnesota English as a Second Language as an additional licensure upon completion of the program.

ESL Courses 28 cr.
Master's Completion Courses   5 cr.
Total 33 cr.

 


Master's Completion Courses: 5 cr.

ESL614 Contemporary Adult Immigrant Literature (1 cr.)

This course explores contemporary writings about and by adult immigrants adjusting to life in American society.  Common themes include struggles with dual identities, feelings of helplessness and re-entry to childhood, homesickness, experiences with prejudice, and difficulties with learning English and gaining employment.  Genres include contemporary fiction memoir, ethnographic studies, picture books, film media, and journalistic accounts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the unique needs of adults immigrating to the United States, particularly those without English language fluency and transferable job skills.
  2. Compare and contrast the integration experiences of adults immigrating from different cultural and economic groups.
  3. Develop a framework for assessing the assimilation status of adult English learners and their needs for themselves and their children.

ESL615 Intergenerational Conflicts in Contemporary Immigrant Fiction (1 cr.)

This course explores contemporary fiction written by and about immigrant families adjusting to life in American society.  The focus is on intergenerational conflicts that arise when immigrant children are caught between American teen culture and expectations of parents rooted in home country culture.  Genres include memoir, contemporary fiction, ethnographic studies, picture books, film media, and journalistic accounts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the unique needs of adolescents caught between the expectations of their parents clinging to home country customs and the lure of contemporary U.S. teen culture.
  2. Compare and contrast the integration experiences of adolescents immigrating from different cultural and economic groups.
  3. Develop a framework for assessing the assimilation status of adolescent immigrants, American-born children, and their families.

ESL616 Research Seminar (0 cr.)

Attend a 1-day seminar that provides an overview of fundamental elements of research design in preparation for ESL611 and ESL/MAI599.

ESL617 Critical Issues of English Language Learners (2 cr.)

In this course ESL master's degree candidates integrate their knowledge of current practices and policies in education of English learners with an understanding of historical and contemporary underlying immigration issues in American society.  Candidates choose a topic of interest to research in depth to demonstrate their ability to evaluate the role of schools as organizations within the larger community and the political context for integration of English learners in American society.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze past immigration policies in relation to American attitudes, employment possibilities, and educational practices.
  2. Synthesize current policies regarding services to English learners with knowledge of past and current immigration trends.
  3. Evaluate the role of schools as organizations within the larger community context for integration of English learners in American society.
  4. Demonstrate the value of critical thinking and self-directed learning.
  5. Create research questions or hypotheses related to policies that impact services to English learners.
  6. Use APA style correctly.

ESL/EDUC599 Research Paper and Presentation (1 cr.)

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of action research.  Each student creates an action research proposal connected to a literature review or a policy-focused research proposal based on an annotated bibliography.

Standards of Effective Practice: 26 cr.

EDUC511 Educational Measurement and Assessment: 5-12 (2 cr.)

The purpose of this course is to help students understand and apply assessment theory to real-world situations. Appropriate practices for the construction, analysis, and interpretation of teacher-made and standardized assessment instruments are examined. Methods of monitoring student progress, evaluating student work, and grading are practiced through a variety of student activities.

EDUC515 Foundations of Education (2 cr.)

This course emphasizes historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education. Students examine connections between theory and practice on topics within these contexts. Topics include today's students, teachers, school systems, teacher effectiveness, current issues, school reform, and professionalism. Throughout the course an emphasis is placed on communication skills and reflective practice in teaching.

EDUC517 Learning, Development, and Exceptionality (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education.  Students examine connections between theory and practice on topics within these contexts.  Topics include today's students, teachers, school systems, teacher effectiveness, current issues, school reform, and professionalism.  Throughout the course an emphasis is laced on communication skills and reflective practice in teaching.

EDUC525 Curriculum and Instruction: Grades 5-12 (4 cr.)

This course prepares 5-12 pre-service teachers to incorporate current research-based instructional strategies and learn how to effectively build a positive classroom climate at the middle/high school level. Students learn to effectively incorporate standards into unit development, design daily lesson plans that align with standards, and construct assignments that support diverse learners. An emphasis is placed on developmentally appropriate practices and meeting the diverse needs of learners. Middle and secondary school philosophy, classroom management, motivation, and student developmental differences are examined.

EDUC534 Technology in the Classroom: 5-12 (2 cr.)

This course is designed to prepare future teachers to utilize 21st century technology tools in and out of the classroom to improve student learning opportunities. Pre-service teachers learn how to engage with the current technologies for instruction, identify multi-media tools to support student learning, and become familiar with tools of technology that can be used to communicate effectively with parents and students.

EDUC539 Scientifically-Based Reading Instruction for Elementary Teachers (3 cr.)

This course meets the K-6 reading standards for all elementary teachers licensed in Minnesota.  Learning modules include: (1) Foundations of reading processes, development, and instruction: (2) instructional practices, approaches, methods, and curriculum materials that support reading instruction; (3) assessment tools and practices for planning and evaluating effective reading instruction; and (4) creating a literate and motivating environment that fosters reading by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.  An associated practicum includes observation, assessment, and intervention with an elementary student.

EDUC560 Student Teaching: Early Adolescence/Young Adult 5-12 (6 cr.)

While working closely with a cooperating teacher, the student begins to assume the role of teacher in an actual classroom setting, gradually becoming fully responsible for planning, organizing, and teaching lessons, maintaining a conducive learning environment, and becoming acquainted with school routines and practices. The pre-service teacher is expected to demonstrate development of professional dispositions of a well-organized, effective, and reflective instructor. Teacher candidates student teach for a semester in an area school. Mastery of the Minnesota State Standards of Effective Practice is expected by the end of student teaching.

EDUC565 Human Relations, Cultural Diversity, and American Indian Culture (2 cr.)

This course provides a general introduction to human relations, cultural diversity, and Indian cultures as these concepts relate to teaching and learning in the K-12 classroom. Emphasis is placed on providing the students with additional knowledge, expertise or skills in creating a classroom learning climate conducive to supporting differences in cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender backgrounds. Special emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding of Minnesota and Wisconsin Indigenous cultures.

EDUC570 Professional Capstone/Portfolio (2 cr.)

This course provides teacher education candidates with mentoring in a largely self-directed experience completing the Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA). The experience is designed to assist teacher education candidates in integrating their professional identity along program-based dimensions of theory and practice. Reflection and consolidation of personal understanding is accomplished through planning, instructing and engaging students, assessing student learning, and critical reflection of student learning and teaching. This course also addresses professionalism and continued professional development for teachers.

Degree Requirements

This degree option allows students without teaching credentials to prepare for initial teacher license while also preparing for Minnesota English as a Second Language licensure.

Standards of Effective Practice 26 cr.
ESL Courses 28 cr.
Master's Completion Courses   5 cr.
Total 59 cr.

 


ESL Courses: 28 cr.

ESL601 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)

This course addresses major topics of second language acquisition, including the processes of first and second language acquisition; the similarities and differences among child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition; the developmental progression of students with limited English proficiency; and methods, techniques, and program models for second language instruction.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the processes of first and second language acquisition. H2, SMU7, (K, A)
  2. Compare the similarities and differences among child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition. H1, SMU7, (K, A)
  3. Assess the developmental progression of students within the range of individual variation of students with limited English proficiency in a given learning context. B3, SMU1, (K, A)
  4. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2 (K, A)
  5. Integrate both language learning and subject matter content for student success in an academic setting. C2, SMU2 (K)
  6. Create and apply strategies for second language instruction. SMU1
     

ESL602 Language and Culture (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop cultural understanding of and communication with speakers of other languages. The impact of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences in the classroom is examined. Various strategies to involve non-English speaking families in the school community are considered.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning.
  2. Analyze differing cultural practices and how these differences may affect the way students learn.
  3. Design communication strategies with parents within the larger sociocultural framework of which the school is a part.
  4. Identify how the student's environment, including family circumstances, community systems, and health and economic conditions, may influence learning.
  5. Relate knowledge of English to knowledge of other languages.
  6. Characterize the cultural and social differences reflected in the US's cultural pluralism.
  7. Interpret the sociolinguistic dynamics of the cultures of the United States.
  8. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom.
  9. Connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities.
  10. Involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities.
     

ESL606 Advanced Methods Instruction for English Language Learners (3 cr.)

This course covers historical, recent, and innovative methods, theories, and models of instruction for English language learners. Instructional design approaches for listening, speaking, reading, and writing consider culture, language and educational backgrounds, individual differences, and English level. Emphasis is on teaching English through academic content and collaboration with mainstream staff.

Upon completion of the course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Use multiple forms of instructional approaches to address different learning styles, background experiences, and performance modes of English Language Learners (ELLs). B1, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the needs of ELLs in a K-12 school setting. B2, SMU1, (K)
  3. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to ELLs. D4, SMU3, (K)
  4. Compare the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications of these differences when teaching ELLs. E1, SMU4, (K)
  5. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as important factors in academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  6. Apply a variety of communication techniques when teaching and use verbal, nonverbal, multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K)
  7. Develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of ESL. J3, SMU9, (K)
    h. Apply instructional strategies and materials to achieve student understanding and learning. J3, SMU9, (K) (g and h are one standard split into two objectives)
  8. Align district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning. J4, SMU9, (K, A)
  9. Formulate plans to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities. J4, SMU9, (K)
  10. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (K)
  11. Evaluate research on English language learning.
     

ESL607 School and Community Collaborations for English Language Learners (4 cr.)

This course includes a clinical experience for application of best practices for K-12 education for English language learners, including content-based methodologies, communication skills in curricular and co-curricular learning experiences, and involvement of the community as active partners in creating educational opportunities and programs.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Connect both language learning and subject matter content as essential to student success in an academic setting.
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as important factors in academic success across the curriculum.
  3. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education.
  4. Develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of English as a second language and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding.
  5. Formulate plans to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities.
  6. Create co-curricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.
  7. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models.
     

ESL608 Writing Instruction (4 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop strong writings programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language and/or cultural differences. Major topics include, exploring the history of the English language; strengthening students' use of academic language (including grammar, usage, mechanics, style); writing for varying purposes and audiences across content areas; deepening the understanding of the role of technology in writing; formal and informal assessment of writing.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1.  Understand a variety of methods, techniques, and program models suitable for second language instruction with diverse learners including adapting existing materials to meet the needs of the students with limited English proficiency.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of communication instruction in the second language context and the importance of developing communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the curriculum.
  3. Understand and uses formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine appropriate placement and to evaluate the progress of students with limited English proficiency. The teacher knows and uses criteria for determining the readiness of students to enter and exit limited English proficiency programs.
  4. Understand the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education.

 

ESL/EDRD600 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development (1-3 cr.)

This course explores the theoretical and scientific underpinnings of literacy development as a basis for developing effective K-12 reading programs. Major topics include knowledge of the relationships between spoken and written language, the historical evolution of English, processes of reading, motivational aspects, stages of reading, spelling, and writing development, and major historical and current instructional approaches and programs for literacy development. Qualitative and quantitative research regarding literacy acquisition and applications to designing balanced reading programs are addressed. This course is also an applied introduction to the study of linguistics as it relates to the teaching of English to non-native speakers. It is divided into language as a system (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics), the social factors affecting language acquisition and development, and the relationship of learning English to that of learning other languages.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2, (K)
  2. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K)
  3. Apply basic linguistic concepts. G1, SMU6, (K, A)
  4. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K, A)
  5. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (K)
  6. Summarize the history and development of the English language. G4, SMU6, (K, A)
  7. Apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents. K1, SMU9, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD603 Reading Instruction for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners (1-2 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop literacy programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language, learning, and/or cultural differences. Three major strands are featured: (1) selection and teaching of literature that reflects the diversity of American classrooms and promotes global understanding; (2) fostering literacy in children who come from non-mainstream cultures; and (3) literacy for English Language Learners (ELL/ESL) and for those with special learning characteristics, for example, gifted and talented. Gender differences in literacy acquisition are also explored.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K, A)
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as an important contributor to academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  3. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K)
  4. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (KA)
  5. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom. I3, SMU8, (K)
     

ESL/EDRD604 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to identify and successfully remediate reading and written language difficulties in all struggling readers, including those served in Title One and LD programs, English Language Learners with literacy delays, and competent readers who have lost motivation to read and write. Concepts related to test construction, selection, and administration are explored through a case study approach. Uses of group and individual standardized and informal literacy measurements are featured.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal second language assessment techniques. F1, SMU5, (K, A)
  2. Analyze the limitations of using traditional assessment procedures in the identification and placement of students with limited English proficiency in academic programs, including gifted and special education programs. F2, SMU5, (K, A)
  3. Use second language assessment including item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency. F3, SMU5, (K, A)
  4. Administer, interpret, and explain the results of standardized tests and alternative methods of assessment to students with limited English proficiency, the students' parents, and to colleagues. F4, SMU5, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD605 Clinical Language and Reading Practicum (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the development and practice of competencies for teaching in the elementary and secondary classroom. The three areas of emphasis are 1- planning, implementing, and evaluating learning in the school environment; 2- critical reflection, monitoring, and adjustment of professional practice; and 3- observation and understanding of administrative and instructional policies and procedures.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the second language needs of students with limited English proficiency in a school setting. B2, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to students with limited English proficiency. D4, SMU3, (K, A)
  3. Use a variety of communication techniques, verbal, nonverbal, and multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K, A)
  4. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education. J2, SMU9, (K, A)
  5. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (KA)
     

Master's Completion Courses: 5 cr.

ESL614 Contemporary Adult Immigrant Literature (1 cr.)

This course explores contemporary writings about and by adult immigrants adjusting to life in American society.  Common themes include struggles with dual identities, feelings of helplessness and re-entry to childhood, homesickness, experiences with prejudice, and difficulties with learning English and gaining employment.  Genres include contemporary fiction memoir, ethnographic studies, picture books, film media, and journalistic accounts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the unique needs of adults immigrating to the United States, particularly those without English language fluency and transferable job skills.
  2. Compare and contrast the integration experiences of adults immigrating from different cultural and economic groups.
  3. Develop a framework for assessing the assimilation status of adult English learners and their needs for themselves and their children.

ESL615 Intergenerational Conflicts in Contemporary Immigrant Fiction (1 cr.)

This course explores contemporary fiction written by and about immigrant families adjusting to life in American society.  The focus is on intergenerational conflicts that arise when immigrant children are caught between American teen culture and expectations of parents rooted in home country culture.  Genres include memoir, contemporary fiction, ethnographic studies, picture books, film media, and journalistic accounts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the unique needs of adolescents caught between the expectations of their parents clinging to home country customs and the lure of contemporary U.S. teen culture.
  2. Compare and contrast the integration experiences of adolescents immigrating from different cultural and economic groups.
  3. Develop a framework for assessing the assimilation status of adolescent immigrants, American-born children, and their families.

ESL616 Research Seminar (0 cr.)

Attend a 1-day seminar that provides an overview of fundamental elements of research design in preparation for ESL611 and ESL/MAI599.

ESL617 Critical Issues of English Language Learners (2 cr.)

In this course ESL master's degree candidates integrate their knowledge of current practices and policies in education of English learners with an understanding of historical and contemporary underlying immigration issues in American society.  Candidates choose a topic of interest to research in depth to demonstrate their ability to evaluate the role of schools as organizations within the larger community and the political context for integration of English learners in American society.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze past immigration policies in relation to American attitudes, employment possibilities, and educational practices.
  2. Synthesize current policies regarding services to English learners with knowledge of past and current immigration trends.
  3. Evaluate the role of schools as organizations within the larger community context for integration of English learners in American society.
  4. Demonstrate the value of critical thinking and self-directed learning.
  5. Create research questions or hypotheses related to policies that impact services to English learners.
  6. Use APA style correctly.

ESL/EDUC599 Research Paper and Presentation (1 cr.)

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of action research.  Each student creates an action research proposal connected to a literature review or a policy-focused research proposal based on an annotated bibliography.

ESL Courses: 28 cr.

ESL601 Second Language Acquisition (3 cr.)

This course addresses major topics of second language acquisition, including the processes of first and second language acquisition; the similarities and differences among child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition; the developmental progression of students with limited English proficiency; and methods, techniques, and program models for second language instruction.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the processes of first and second language acquisition. H2, SMU7, (K, A)
  2. Compare the similarities and differences among child, adolescent, and adult language acquisition. H1, SMU7, (K, A)
  3. Assess the developmental progression of students within the range of individual variation of students with limited English proficiency in a given learning context. B3, SMU1, (K, A)
  4. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2 (K, A)
  5. Integrate both language learning and subject matter content for student success in an academic setting. C2, SMU2 (K)
  6. Create and apply strategies for second language instruction. SMU1
     

ESL602 Language and Culture (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop cultural understanding of and communication with speakers of other languages. The impact of cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences in the classroom is examined. Various strategies to involve non-English speaking families in the school community are considered.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning.
  2. Analyze differing cultural practices and how these differences may affect the way students learn.
  3. Design communication strategies with parents within the larger sociocultural framework of which the school is a part.
  4. Identify how the student's environment, including family circumstances, community systems, and health and economic conditions, may influence learning.
  5. Relate knowledge of English to knowledge of other languages.
  6. Characterize the cultural and social differences reflected in the US's cultural pluralism.
  7. Interpret the sociolinguistic dynamics of the cultures of the United States.
  8. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom.
  9. Connect students' schooling experiences with everyday life, the workplace, and further educational opportunities.
  10. Involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities.
     

ESL606 Advanced Methods Instruction for English Language Learners (3 cr.)

This course covers historical, recent, and innovative methods, theories, and models of instruction for English language learners. Instructional design approaches for listening, speaking, reading, and writing consider culture, language and educational backgrounds, individual differences, and English level. Emphasis is on teaching English through academic content and collaboration with mainstream staff.

Upon completion of the course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Use multiple forms of instructional approaches to address different learning styles, background experiences, and performance modes of English Language Learners (ELLs). B1, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the needs of ELLs in a K-12 school setting. B2, SMU1, (K)
  3. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to ELLs. D4, SMU3, (K)
  4. Compare the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications of these differences when teaching ELLs. E1, SMU4, (K)
  5. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as important factors in academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  6. Apply a variety of communication techniques when teaching and use verbal, nonverbal, multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K)
  7. Develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of ESL. J3, SMU9, (K)
    h. Apply instructional strategies and materials to achieve student understanding and learning. J3, SMU9, (K) (g and h are one standard split into two objectives)
  8. Align district, school, and department mission and goals in program planning. J4, SMU9, (K, A)
  9. Formulate plans to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities. J4, SMU9, (K)
  10. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (K)
  11. Evaluate research on English language learning.
     

ESL607 School and Community Collaborations for English Language Learners (4 cr.)

This course includes a clinical experience for application of best practices for K-12 education for English language learners, including content-based methodologies, communication skills in curricular and co-curricular learning experiences, and involvement of the community as active partners in creating educational opportunities and programs.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Connect both language learning and subject matter content as essential to student success in an academic setting.
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as important factors in academic success across the curriculum.
  3. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education.
  4. Develop curriculum goals and purposes based on the central concepts of English as a second language and know how to apply instructional strategies and materials for achieving student understanding.
  5. Formulate plans to involve representatives of business, industry, and community organizations as active partners in creating educational opportunities.
  6. Create co-curricular and extracurricular activities in the teaching and learning process.
  7. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models.
     

ESL608 Writing Instruction (4 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop strong writings programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language and/or cultural differences. Major topics include, exploring the history of the English language; strengthening students' use of academic language (including grammar, usage, mechanics, style); writing for varying purposes and audiences across content areas; deepening the understanding of the role of technology in writing; formal and informal assessment of writing.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1.  Understand a variety of methods, techniques, and program models suitable for second language instruction with diverse learners including adapting existing materials to meet the needs of the students with limited English proficiency.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of communication instruction in the second language context and the importance of developing communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing across the curriculum.
  3. Understand and uses formal and informal second language assessment techniques to determine appropriate placement and to evaluate the progress of students with limited English proficiency. The teacher knows and uses criteria for determining the readiness of students to enter and exit limited English proficiency programs.
  4. Understand the contributions of general and applied linguistics to second language education.

 

ESL/EDRD600 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development (1-3 cr.)

This course explores the theoretical and scientific underpinnings of literacy development as a basis for developing effective K-12 reading programs. Major topics include knowledge of the relationships between spoken and written language, the historical evolution of English, processes of reading, motivational aspects, stages of reading, spelling, and writing development, and major historical and current instructional approaches and programs for literacy development. Qualitative and quantitative research regarding literacy acquisition and applications to designing balanced reading programs are addressed. This course is also an applied introduction to the study of linguistics as it relates to the teaching of English to non-native speakers. It is divided into language as a system (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics), the social factors affecting language acquisition and development, and the relationship of learning English to that of learning other languages.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate how limited English proficiency affects learning. C1, SMU2, (K)
  2. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K)
  3. Apply basic linguistic concepts. G1, SMU6, (K, A)
  4. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K, A)
  5. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (K)
  6. Summarize the history and development of the English language. G4, SMU6, (K, A)
  7. Apply educational principles relevant to the physical, social, emotional, moral, and cognitive development of children, preadolescents, and adolescents. K1, SMU9, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD603 Reading Instruction for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Learners (1-2 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to develop literacy programs for students who differ in how they acquire literacy because of language, learning, and/or cultural differences. Three major strands are featured: (1) selection and teaching of literature that reflects the diversity of American classrooms and promotes global understanding; (2) fostering literacy in children who come from non-mainstream cultures; and (3) literacy for English Language Learners (ELL/ESL) and for those with special learning characteristics, for example, gifted and talented. Gender differences in literacy acquisition are also explored.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the differences between literacy development in the first language and the second language, and the implications for teaching second language learners. E1, SMU4, (K, A)
  2. Design strategies to develop communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as an important contributor to academic success across the curriculum. E2, SMU4, (K)
  3. Outline the features of English including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. G2, SMU6, (K)
  4. Relate knowledge of English to other languages. G3, SMU6, (KA)
  5. Analyze how cultural, linguistic, ethnic, regional, and gender differences affect communication in the classroom. I3, SMU8, (K)
     

ESL/EDRD604 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to identify and successfully remediate reading and written language difficulties in all struggling readers, including those served in Title One and LD programs, English Language Learners with literacy delays, and competent readers who have lost motivation to read and write. Concepts related to test construction, selection, and administration are explored through a case study approach. Uses of group and individual standardized and informal literacy measurements are featured.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal second language assessment techniques. F1, SMU5, (K, A)
  2. Analyze the limitations of using traditional assessment procedures in the identification and placement of students with limited English proficiency in academic programs, including gifted and special education programs. F2, SMU5, (K, A)
  3. Use second language assessment including item and test construction methods appropriate for students with limited English proficiency. F3, SMU5, (K, A)
  4. Administer, interpret, and explain the results of standardized tests and alternative methods of assessment to students with limited English proficiency, the students' parents, and to colleagues. F4, SMU5, (K, A)
     

ESL/EDRD605 Clinical Language and Reading Practicum (1-3 cr.)

This course focuses on the development and practice of competencies for teaching in the elementary and secondary classroom. The three areas of emphasis are 1- planning, implementing, and evaluating learning in the school environment; 2- critical reflection, monitoring, and adjustment of professional practice; and 3- observation and understanding of administrative and instructional policies and procedures.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Adopt appropriate learning materials and adapt teaching strategies to meet the second language needs of students with limited English proficiency in a school setting. B2, SMU1, (K, A)
  2. Plan with other professionals to improve the quality of educational services provided to students with limited English proficiency. D4, SMU3, (K, A)
  3. Use a variety of communication techniques, verbal, nonverbal, and multimedia, and other technology based resources that enhance student learning. E3, SMU4, (K, A)
  4. Apply the research base for and the best practices of kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school education. J2, SMU9, (K, A)
  5. Apply the standards of effective practice in teaching students through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with kindergarten and primary, intermediate, and middle level and high school students within a range of educational programming models. J8, SMU9, (KA)
     

Degree Requirements

 This degree option is for currently licensed teachers who do not plan to seek Minnesota English as a Second Language as an additional licensure upon completion of the program.

ESL Courses 28 cr.
Master's Completion Courses   5 cr.
Total 33 cr.

 


Master's Completion Courses: 5 cr.

ESL614 Contemporary Adult Immigrant Literature (1 cr.)

This course explores contemporary writings about and by adult immigrants adjusting to life in American society.  Common themes include struggles with dual identities, feelings of helplessness and re-entry to childhood, homesickness, experiences with prejudice, and difficulties with learning English and gaining employment.  Genres include contemporary fiction memoir, ethnographic studies, picture books, film media, and journalistic accounts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the unique needs of adults immigrating to the United States, particularly those without English language fluency and transferable job skills.
  2. Compare and contrast the integration experiences of adults immigrating from different cultural and economic groups.
  3. Develop a framework for assessing the assimilation status of adult English learners and their needs for themselves and their children.

ESL615 Intergenerational Conflicts in Contemporary Immigrant Fiction (1 cr.)

This course explores contemporary fiction written by and about immigrant families adjusting to life in American society.  The focus is on intergenerational conflicts that arise when immigrant children are caught between American teen culture and expectations of parents rooted in home country culture.  Genres include memoir, contemporary fiction, ethnographic studies, picture books, film media, and journalistic accounts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the unique needs of adolescents caught between the expectations of their parents clinging to home country customs and the lure of contemporary U.S. teen culture.
  2. Compare and contrast the integration experiences of adolescents immigrating from different cultural and economic groups.
  3. Develop a framework for assessing the assimilation status of adolescent immigrants, American-born children, and their families.

ESL616 Research Seminar (0 cr.)

Attend a 1-day seminar that provides an overview of fundamental elements of research design in preparation for ESL611 and ESL/MAI599.

ESL617 Critical Issues of English Language Learners (2 cr.)

In this course ESL master's degree candidates integrate their knowledge of current practices and policies in education of English learners with an understanding of historical and contemporary underlying immigration issues in American society.  Candidates choose a topic of interest to research in depth to demonstrate their ability to evaluate the role of schools as organizations within the larger community and the political context for integration of English learners in American society.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze past immigration policies in relation to American attitudes, employment possibilities, and educational practices.
  2. Synthesize current policies regarding services to English learners with knowledge of past and current immigration trends.
  3. Evaluate the role of schools as organizations within the larger community context for integration of English learners in American society.
  4. Demonstrate the value of critical thinking and self-directed learning.
  5. Create research questions or hypotheses related to policies that impact services to English learners.
  6. Use APA style correctly.

ESL/EDUC599 Research Paper and Presentation (1 cr.)

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of action research.  Each student creates an action research proposal connected to a literature review or a policy-focused research proposal based on an annotated bibliography.




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Michelle Dougherty, M.A.

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Education

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH112

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5122

mdougher@smumn.edu