Student thinking in classroom

Addiction Studies (Certificate)

The Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies program at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota is designed to provide graduate level counseling skills in the areas of chemical dependency and addiction (substance use disorders).

The focus of the program is to develop professionals who are able to provide individualized services informed by evidence-based practices. Students will learn to integrate a variety of models, theories, and research-based approaches to diverse cultural populations.

Through this program, students will gain an understanding of addictions, chemical use, and dependency on individuals, families, and society. A goal of the program is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to be able to recognize and treat individuals with chemical and co-occurring concerns. A variety of treatment approaches will be studied with an emphasis on chemical health. Through their coursework and practicum experiences, students will be expected to develop competency in the following 12 Core Functions of an alcohol and drug counselor:

  • Screening
  • Intake
  • Orientation
  • Assessment
  • Treatment planning
  • Counseling
  • Case management crisis management
  • Crisis intervention
  • Client education
  • Referral
  • Reports and record keeping
  • Consultation with other professionals regarding treatment and services
Woman talking with notes

Working As An Alcohol and Drug Counselor

Upon completion of the Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies program and obtaining licensure from the State of Minnesota, students may find themselves working in a hospital, private practice, or treatment center, or perhaps they may be providing chemical health assessments for employers or the court system. Licensed alcohol and drug counselors perform a variety of duties that require academic as well as practical experience.

Dual Program Option: M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services and Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies

Saint Mary's offers a new dual program option to prepare students to work in the field of mental health counseling as well as alcohol and drug treatment. The program is designed to help students meet the Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's educational requirements for licensure as Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LADC), Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC), and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (LPCC).

The emphasis of this dual program option is an integration of both mental health and substance use theory and skills that can be applied to the profession. Students in the dual program have the opportunity to develop skills academically and experientially to work in mental health, chemical health, dual-disorder, criminal justice, hospital, assessment, detox, residential, and outpatient settings.

This option combines the requirements of the M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services  and the Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies in as few as 60 credits. An Integrated Practicum of 880 hours is based on the requirements of the State of Minnesota's practicum requirements for licensure as a LPC/LPCC and LADC.

Gainful Employment Information

Effective July 1, 2011, the U.S. Department of Education requires institutions with nondegree programs defined as “Gainful Employment programs” to disclose certain information about these programs. Read the report.

From Start to Finish

  • You can earn your Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies in a little more than two years.
  • Students can start at the beginning of any semester.

Apply Today

Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities location.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

Core Courses 18 cr.
Practicum Courses   4 cr.
Total 22 cr.

For those students seeking both the M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Certificate please see the dual program requirements.

M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Certificate 


Core Courses: 18 cr.

ADS551 Historical and Contemporary Foundations of Addiction Theories (2 cr.)

This course explores various contemporary and historic theories that account for the etiology of addiction to psychoactive substances. Emphasis is on psychological, biological, and sociocultural theories of drug addiction. Topics include the role of family and society, roles/responsibilities of the therapist, addiction as a disease, the 12-Step Framework, abstinence, and harm reduction.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compare and contrast competing models and theories of addiction and addiction treatment.
  2. Analyze individual and family contributions to the development, maintenance, and treatment of substance abuse and addiction from a historical and contemporary perspective.
  3. Evaluate current research and data regarding the effectiveness of prevailing models of treatment.
  4. Demonstrate an ability to differentiate and work within the 12 Core Functions of Addictions Counseling.
     

ADS552 Applied Research and Evaluation in Addictions (2 cr.)

This course examines the development and implementation of research and evaluation methodologies to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of clinical services for individuals impacted by substance abuse and addiction. The course focuses on using current information technology to locate and critically evaluate the assessment and treatment literature, the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based practices (EBP), program evaluation and needs assessment strategies, and neuropsychological and psychopharmacological research.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Utilize accepted indicators of quality to critique and evaluate relevant research studies.
  2. Based on the literature and research findings, recommend improvements to services and design ways to assess the effectiveness.
  3. Assess the impact of clinical services, including identified resources needs and potential barriers.
  4. Explain the design and rationale of the evaluations of individual clients, programs, or other clinical practices, including the findings, implications, and recommendations.
     

ADS553 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Addiction Services (2 cr.)

This course examines the ethical, legal, and professional issues in the continuum of care in addictions work. The Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy code of ethics, selected federal and state law pertaining to the addictions field, and overlying professionalism are synthesized and applied, while integrating the 12 core functions.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply their knowledge of the Minnesota Board of Health code of ethics in the field of substance abuse, use, and dependence in general practice and case situations.
  2. Recognize and resolve ethical dilemmas by applying methods of ethical analysis and decision-making skills, being aware of one's own biases and beliefs.
  3. Apply ethical and legal practices and responsibilities in providing professional services.
  4. Analyze and address specific issues that arise from the interface of addictions practice with medical, legal, religious, business, health reimbursement, and educational institutions.
  5. Describe practice activities and responsibilities, including consultation, necessary for professionalism along the continuum of care in addictions practice.
     

ADS554 Psychopharmacology and Psychophysiology in Addiction Disorders (2 cr.)

This course examines the types and actions of substances of abuse, including street drugs, prescribed medications, over-the-counter compounds, herbs and other supplements, and toxic materials. Emphasis is placed on integrating counseling skills with pharmacotherapy while addressing the needs of clients from a variety of cultural and sub-cultural groups. The neurobiological components of abuse and addiction are examined and synthesized with social and psychological variables and risk factors. The effects of abuse and addiction on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology are analyzed to incorporate into treatment planning and program development.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Critically evaluate the psychopharmacological and psychophysiological literature.
  2. Synthesize counseling theory and techniques with pharmacological information and practices.
  3. Distinguish and describe the effects of various substances of abuse on the physical, emotional, mental, and social aspects of the individual.
  4. Formulate an individualized and realistic treatment plan by analyzing and evaluating the physiological, social and cultural, and psychological factors placing individuals at risk to abuse substances.
     

ADS555 Multicultural Aspects of Addiction (2 cr.)

This course provides an integrated overview of the psychology and sociology of psychoactive drug use, abuse, addiction, and evidenced-based treatment approaches in contemporary American society and other world cultures. The complex relationships between individual, family, group, and sociocultural dimensions of drug using are explored. Special attention is given to variables of age, ethnicity, spirituality, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic status.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine one's own biases and prejudices regarding chemical use.
  2. Review common and evidence-based assessment, diagnosis, and treatment approaches for chemical health from diverse individual, couple, family, and community perspectives.
  3. Develop practical and effective skills for interviewing, assessing, and treatment planning for diverse populations, considering modalities such as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, Motivational Enhancement Training, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Multi-systemic Family Therapy, and Narrative Approaches.
  4. Analyze assumptions, strengths, and limitations of approaches such as Abstinence, 12-Step, Harm Reduction, and Responsible Use for diverse groups.
  5. Articulate the distinctive treatment issues and needs with respect to individual differences within their cultural context.
     

ADS556 Diagnosis and Assessment of Co-occurring Disorders (3 cr.)

This course examines effective applications of current theories and models in the diagnosis, intervention, and treatment of addictions and co-occurring disorders and associated issues. The incorporation of biopsychosocial factors including socioeconomics, race, ethnicity, culture and subcultures, and mental health are addressed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Locate, evaluate, and implement theories and models of evidence-based approaches to diagnoses, interventions, treatments, and associated services in the addiction field.
  2. Identify and integrate community, networkers, stakeholders, and socioeconomic factors into diagnosis, intervention, and treatment.
  3. Apply biopsychosocial theories, including intergenerational, genetic, and environmental factors; and family, partner, and other relationship roles into assessment, intervention, and treatment.
  4. Establish effective relationships with clients and other professionals according to one's role along the continuum of care.
  5. Identify the presence of co-occurring disorders and associated issues for coordinating services and evaluating program efficacy.
  6. Synthesize and apply ethical, legal, and professional responsibly within the 12 core functions when diagnosing, intervening, and treating along the continuum of care.

ADS557 Families & Addictive Related Issues Across the Lifespan (2 cr.)

The course explores the impact of substance abuse and other addictions on the family, individually and systemically. It seeks to offer current understanding of the impacts of developmental effects throughout the lifespan. Historical and contemporary theory and techniques used in the treatment and recovery for individuals and family systems are studied.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess the role and adverse effects of addiction on family members.
  2. Synthesize theories, including intergenerational, mental health, genetic, and environmental into the continuum of care with families.
  3. Evaluate, implement, and apply evidence-based treatment approaches, theories, and models currently in practice.
  4. Incorporate families and system factors into treatment planning along the continuum of care while satisfying the 12 core functions.
  5. Integrate into family practice stakeholders, community connections, support networkers, cultures, and sub-cultures along the continuum of care.

ADS558 Individual & Group Counseling & Case Management (3 cr.)

This course focuses on providing an understanding of the unique considerations when working within an individual and group format in the continuum of care of alcohol and drug problems. The biopsychosocial model is used to conceptualize addiction, and prevailing modalities such as Cognitive Behavioral, Solution-Focused Brief, Motivational Interviewing, 12-Step Facilitation, and Harm Reduction strategies. The 12 core functions of addictions counseling provide a framework for navigating the treatment process.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Distinguish between individual and group counseling and case management.
  2. Articulate one's own strengths, growth areas, needs, and motivations to help those struggling with alcohol and drug abuse challenges.
  3. Assess ethical dilemmas and legal issues commonly encountered in training and professional practice of alcohol and drug counseling.
  4. Differentiate and integrate the prevailing models of treatment when providing services for alcohol and drug abuse challenges.
  5. Apply knowledge of drug interactions and brain chemistry for the coordination of care.
  6. Apply different evidenced-based strategies for assessment, treatment, and case management.
     

Practicum: 4 cr.

ADS590 Practicum I (2 cr.)

(440 hours) Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions and alcohol and drug abuse problems. This work must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours with the experience divided into two 440 hours of practicum. The student is supervised by an experienced Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug counseling. A practicum seminar is taken concurrently with this work and provides an opportunity for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply theories of chemical dependency and addiction to practice.
  2. Utilize the 12 core functions in the treatment of clients.
  3. Integrate relevant psychopharmacological principles and research into practice.
  4. Incorporate legal and ethical principles into work with clients.
  5. Demonstrate a multicultural perspective in counseling practice.
  6. Apply knowledge of family systems and sociocultural factors to work with clients.
  7. Provide effective counseling to clients with co-occurring disorders/dual diagnoses.

 

ADS591 Practicum II (2 cr.)

(440 hours) Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions and alcohol and drug abuse problems. This work must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours with the experience divided into two 440 hours of practicum. The student is supervised by an experienced Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug counseling. A practicum seminar is taken concurrently with this work and provides an opportunity for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply theories of chemical dependency and addiction to practice.
  2. Utilize the 12 core functions in the treatment of clients.
  3. Integrate relevant psychopharmacological principles and research into practice.
  4. Incorporate legal and ethical principles into work with clients.
  5. Demonstrate a multicultural perspective in counseling practice.
  6. Apply knowledge of family systems and sociocultural factors to work with clients.
  7. Provide effective counseling to clients with co-occurring disorders/dual diagnoses.

ADS592 Practicum Completion Seminar (0 cr.)

Students work in a setting, which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This work must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours with the experience divided into two 440 hours of practicum at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug counseling. An experienced, Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC), who is approved by the BBHT to provide supervision, supervises the student on-site. A practicum seminar course is taken concurrently with this field experience, providing opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Utilize the 12 Core Functions in the treatment of clients.
  2. Apply theories of chemical dependency and addiction to clinical practice.
  3. Integrate relevant psycho-pharmacological principles and research into practice.                                                                                                                       
  4. Incorporate legal and ethical principles into work with clients.
  5. Demonstrate a multicultural perspective in counseling practice.
  6. Apply knowledge of family systems and socio-cultural factors to work with clients.
  7. Provide effective counseling to clients with co-occurring disorders/dual diagnoses.

Core Courses: 18 cr.

PY605 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)

The course examines characteristic changes in behavior and functioning in each stage of life from conception to death. Physical, cognitive, affective, and social bases of behavior are explored. The elements of professional writing are applied.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the systematic nature of the patterns of growth and development in all human beings.
  2. Examine the developmental tasks which the individual must master at each stage of his or her life span.
  3. Describe potential developmental psychopathologies and their impact on the normative process.
  4. Analyze the effects of social and cultural factors upon the individual's development.
  5. Apply principles of development to the understanding of individual behavioral reactions.
  6. Analyze writings from research journals and mainstream press as they relate to the course content.
  7. Apply professional writing style.

PY607 Theories of Personality (3 cr.)

Major theories of personality are covered as represented by the biophysical, intrapsychic, existential, and behavioral approaches.  The elements of professional writing are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the major personality theories and theorists.
  2. Evaluate personality theories.
  3. Identify and understand relevant issues in personality.
  4. Analyze the basic relationships between personality theory and other aspects of counseling psychology: assessment, research, and treatment.
  5. Identify a personal orientation to personality theory.
  6. Apply professional writing style.
     

PY608 Psychopathology (3 cr.)

This course examines the healthy personality, maladjustment, transient disorders, anxiety states, psychosis, mood, psychosomatic, and personality disorders. The course focuses on the description of the main criteria and associated features of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnostic groups. In addition, etiology, prognosis, prevention, and treatment of the disorders are considered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the classifications and categories of the major mental disorders, including the importance of incorporating a client's cultural and educational background.
  2. Apply the diagnostic criteria as defined by DSM to actual clinical cases.
  3. Analyze clinical information and use diagnostic criteria to differentiate between mental disorders.
  4. Evaluate the problems associated with diagnosing.
     

PY613 Counseling Theory and Technique (3 cr.)

Major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy are analyzed with emphasis on applications in the theoretical relationship. Professional psychological writing style is discussed in this course.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the major theoretical approaches to counseling.
  2. Acquire basic counseling skills.
  3. Apply therapeutic theory to the skills and roles used in the practice of therapy.
  4. Apply ethical principles to counseling.
  5. Apply professional psychological writing style.
  6. Articulate a personal theory of counseling and define personal style.
  7. Evaluate the cultural implications of modern psychotherapy.
  8. Apply an awareness and appreciation of diversity to counseling.
  9. Support reasoning in application of theory and technique to diagnoses and treatment interventions.
  10. Understand the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting and evaluating interventions.

PY620 Statistical Techniques and Research Methods (3 cr.)

The course provides an overview of research methods commonly used in clinical and counseling psychology. Both research methodology and statistical analysis are reviewed. The course focuses on the interpretation and understanding of research and applied statistical procedures.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand basic descriptive statistics and the fundamentals of hypothesis testing.
  2. Apply appropriate research and statistical methods to research questions.
  3. Recognize the appropriate applications of statistical findings and their limitations.
  4. Evaluate research presented in counseling/clinical psychology.
  5. Apply the fundamentals of research to counseling psychology.
     

PY641 Marriage and Family Counseling (3 cr.)

This course covers marriage and family therapy theories, their historical and cultural contexts, and their application to family therapy process.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply understanding of the major theoretical/conceptual frameworks of the family field, the historical roots, key concepts, and assumptions.
  2. Evaluate couple, marriage, and family dilemmas using major models of marriage and family therapy.
  3. Analyze and evaluate the relationships between major conceptual frameworks and therapy models.
  4. Apply understanding of diversity and multiculturalism in one's own developing model of marriage and family therapy.
  5. Utilize professional databases and other professional resources in applying, analyzing, and evaluating the literature of the field, including efficacy research.
  6. Create and articulate one's own developing model of marriage and family therapy.
  7. Analyze the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting and evaluating interventions.

Degree Requirements

For students completing the MA in Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Certificate simultaneously: 

Core Courses 18 cr.
Assessment Courses   8 cr.
Counseling Courses   9 cr.
Additional PY Required Courses   9 cr.
Additional ADS Required Courses 10 cr.
Required Practicum Experience   6 cr.
Integration Paper and Oral Examination   0 cr.
Total 60 cr.

 


Assessment Courses: 8 cr.

ADS556 Diagnosis and Assessment of Co-occurring Disorders (3 cr.)

This course examines effective applications of current theories and models in the diagnosis, intervention, and treatment of addictions and co-occurring disorders and associated issues. The incorporation of biopsychosocial factors including socioeconomics, race, ethnicity, culture and subcultures, and mental health are addressed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Locate, evaluate, and implement theories and models of evidence-based approaches to diagnoses, interventions, treatments, and associated services in the addiction field.
  2. Identify and integrate community, networkers, stakeholders, and socioeconomic factors into diagnosis, intervention, and treatment.
  3. Apply biopsychosocial theories, including intergenerational, genetic, and environmental factors; and family, partner, and other relationship roles into assessment, intervention, and treatment.
  4. Establish effective relationships with clients and other professionals according to one's role along the continuum of care.
  5. Identify the presence of co-occurring disorders and associated issues for coordinating services and evaluating program efficacy.
  6. Synthesize and apply ethical, legal, and professional responsibly within the 12 core functions when diagnosing, intervening, and treating along the continuum of care.

PY621 Psychological Assessment (3 cr.)

This course investigates the principles and history of psychological testing, both individual and group, and assessment. Theories of measurement and selected psychological tests and inventories are covered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the assumptions, basic statistics, and issues regarding psychological testing.
  2. Understand the major tests in ability, personality, and vocational assessment and how these are used to assess the client's strengths, attributes, and problems.
  3. Evaluate psychological tests on the basis of accepted assessment criteria and relevant research.
     

PY631 Personality Assessment: Adolescent and Adult (2 cr.)

The course examines and compares various methods of personality assessment of adolescents and adults, including standardized tests, behavioral analyses, and interview techniques.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the history, purpose, and current research of objective and projective personality measures.
  2. Evaluate the results of personality measures to gain knowledge regarding a client's strengths, attributes, and problems, and be able to use this information to provide reasoning and support of clinical diagnosis and treatment interventions.
  3. Integrate information gained from clinical observation, interview, and personality measures and communicate this information verbally as well as in a written report.
     

Counseling Courses: 9 cr.

ADS555 Multicultural Aspects of Addiction (2 cr.)

This course provides an integrated overview of the psychology and sociology of psychoactive drug use, abuse, addiction, and evidenced-based treatment approaches in contemporary American society and other world cultures. The complex relationships between individual, family, group, and sociocultural dimensions of drug using are explored. Special attention is given to variables of age, ethnicity, spirituality, gender, sexuality, and socioeconomic status.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine one's own biases and prejudices regarding chemical use.
  2. Review common and evidence-based assessment, diagnosis, and treatment approaches for chemical health from diverse individual, couple, family, and community perspectives.
  3. Develop practical and effective skills for interviewing, assessing, and treatment planning for diverse populations, considering modalities such as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, Motivational Enhancement Training, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Multi-systemic Family Therapy, and Narrative Approaches.
  4. Analyze assumptions, strengths, and limitations of approaches such as Abstinence, 12-Step, Harm Reduction, and Responsible Use for diverse groups.
  5. Articulate the distinctive treatment issues and needs with respect to individual differences within their cultural context.
     

ADS558 Individual & Group Counseling & Case Management (3 cr.)

This course focuses on providing an understanding of the unique considerations when working within an individual and group format in the continuum of care of alcohol and drug problems. The biopsychosocial model is used to conceptualize addiction, and prevailing modalities such as Cognitive Behavioral, Solution-Focused Brief, Motivational Interviewing, 12-Step Facilitation, and Harm Reduction strategies. The 12 core functions of addictions counseling provide a framework for navigating the treatment process.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Distinguish between individual and group counseling and case management.
  2. Articulate one's own strengths, growth areas, needs, and motivations to help those struggling with alcohol and drug abuse challenges.
  3. Assess ethical dilemmas and legal issues commonly encountered in training and professional practice of alcohol and drug counseling.
  4. Differentiate and integrate the prevailing models of treatment when providing services for alcohol and drug abuse challenges.
  5. Apply knowledge of drug interactions and brain chemistry for the coordination of care.
  6. Apply different evidenced-based strategies for assessment, treatment, and case management.
     

PY604 Career Counseling: Theory and Procedures (2 cr.)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the history and theories of career development as well as an introduction to the procedures used in career development and lifestyle counseling. Career counseling tools and techniques are examined. The interrelationships of life roles are emphasized in career and lifestyle planning.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and differentiate the major theories of career and life development.
  2. Apply procedures used in the field of career counseling.
  3. Utilize tools and techniques commonly used in career and life development.
  4. Apply career counseling theories to practice.
  5. Utilize resources available to career counselors and their clients.
  6. Evaluate the interrelationships among work, family, and other life roles in career and lifestyle planning.

PY665 Counseling Skills and Practice (2 cr.)

Students practice the fundamental skills associated with effective helping relationships. Counseling skill acquisition and application are emphasized. Ethics and diversity are integrated into counseling skills acquisition and application.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Acquire a repertoire of basic counseling skills.
  2. Develop an understanding of the stages of the counseling process and therapeutic relationships and to apply the counseling techniques most appropriate to each of these stages.
  3. Apply general theoretical knowledge of the counseling process and the therapeutic relationship to practical counseling skills.
  4. Develop basic skills for effective clinical interviewing, assessment, and case management.
  5. Apply basic ethical principles in client therapist relationships.
  6. Identify components of counselor self-awareness that can be utilized in effective self-assessment.
  7. Apply an awareness and appreciation of diversity to counseling.
  8. Understand the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting counseling skills.
     

 

Additional Required PY Courses: 9 cr.

PY575 Orientation to the Profession of Counseling (1 cr.)

This course provides an orientation to the profession of counseling. The history and philosophy of the field are covered as well as the roles and settings of professional counselors. Additionally, the developmental process involved with acquiring an identity as a professional counselor is addressed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and evaluate the function and role of counselors in various professional settings.
  2. Understand a process, including the stages by which counselors develop professional identity, and then apply this understanding to analyze and assess their current level of development.
  3. Synthesize their awareness of personal characteristics, behaviors, values, attitudes, and abilities that affect performance as a counselor, both in general and specifically with the self.
  4. Evaluate the impact of ethical considerations on the practice and conduct of a professional counselor, and be able to apply this understanding to specific situations and construct appropriate approaches to ethical dilemmas.
  5. Expand their appreciation of diversity as it relates to the roles and functions of the professional counselor within various settings and apply mechanisms to support and foster continued growth.
  6. Apply professional writing skills and professional verbal expression, including the accurate use of APA style.
     

PY576 Social Psychology (2 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the perspectives, research, and empirical findings of social psychology. Topics covered include self and identity, social influence, attribution theory, attitudes and attitude change, personal relationships, gender, age and race, and their application in mental health.

Upon completion of this program, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the way people think, feel, and behave in social situations.
  2. Understand how people influence, and are influenced by, others around them.
  3. Evaluate major social psychological theories.
  4. Apply these theories to the counseling process.

PY606 Psychophysiology (3 cr.)

This course examines the basic anatomy of the nervous system, the normal physiological functions of the nervous systems, the biological bases of behavior, behavioral disorders, and brain diseases. The course reviews current research on the role of biological basis of behavior.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.
  2. Describe potential biological mechanisms of behavioral disorders and brain diseases based on an understanding of current research in the field.
  3. Apply current research in the analysis of psychological disorders.
  4. Evaluate reasons for diagnosis and treatment interventions.
  5. Describe the biological basis of selected psychological disorders.

PY625 Ethics and Professional Issues in Psychology (3 cr.)

Ethical principles and issues underlying the professional practice of psychology are examined. Attention is focused on the Ethical Principles of the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and standards of practice the related State of Minnesota statutes and rules, and current issues of concern to the field.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the practice of ethics in the domain of psychology and its distinction from legal process and rules of conduct.
  2. Formulate an individual ethical decision-making process.
  3. Apply the professional codes of ethics and other resources in decision making.
  4. Apply the Minnesota statutes and rules for psychology and counseling to clinical situations.
  5. Evaluate important trends in professional issues for psychology.
  6. Understand the cultural contexts of ethical dilemmas and think creatively in identifying appropriate interventions.

Additional Required ADS Courses: 10 cr.

ADS551 Historical and Contemporary Foundations of Addiction Theories (2 cr.)

This course explores various contemporary and historic theories that account for the etiology of addiction to psychoactive substances. Emphasis is on psychological, biological, and sociocultural theories of drug addiction. Topics include the role of family and society, roles/responsibilities of the therapist, addiction as a disease, the 12-Step Framework, abstinence, and harm reduction.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compare and contrast competing models and theories of addiction and addiction treatment.
  2. Analyze individual and family contributions to the development, maintenance, and treatment of substance abuse and addiction from a historical and contemporary perspective.
  3. Evaluate current research and data regarding the effectiveness of prevailing models of treatment.
  4. Demonstrate an ability to differentiate and work within the 12 Core Functions of Addictions Counseling.
     

ADS552 Applied Research and Evaluation in Addictions (2 cr.)

This course examines the development and implementation of research and evaluation methodologies to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of clinical services for individuals impacted by substance abuse and addiction. The course focuses on using current information technology to locate and critically evaluate the assessment and treatment literature, the implementation and evaluation of evidence-based practices (EBP), program evaluation and needs assessment strategies, and neuropsychological and psychopharmacological research.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Utilize accepted indicators of quality to critique and evaluate relevant research studies.
  2. Based on the literature and research findings, recommend improvements to services and design ways to assess the effectiveness.
  3. Assess the impact of clinical services, including identified resources needs and potential barriers.
  4. Explain the design and rationale of the evaluations of individual clients, programs, or other clinical practices, including the findings, implications, and recommendations.
     

ADS553 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Addiction Services (2 cr.)

This course examines the ethical, legal, and professional issues in the continuum of care in addictions work. The Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy code of ethics, selected federal and state law pertaining to the addictions field, and overlying professionalism are synthesized and applied, while integrating the 12 core functions.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply their knowledge of the Minnesota Board of Health code of ethics in the field of substance abuse, use, and dependence in general practice and case situations.
  2. Recognize and resolve ethical dilemmas by applying methods of ethical analysis and decision-making skills, being aware of one's own biases and beliefs.
  3. Apply ethical and legal practices and responsibilities in providing professional services.
  4. Analyze and address specific issues that arise from the interface of addictions practice with medical, legal, religious, business, health reimbursement, and educational institutions.
  5. Describe practice activities and responsibilities, including consultation, necessary for professionalism along the continuum of care in addictions practice.
     

ADS554 Psychopharmacology and Psychophysiology in Addiction Disorders (2 cr.)

This course examines the types and actions of substances of abuse, including street drugs, prescribed medications, over-the-counter compounds, herbs and other supplements, and toxic materials. Emphasis is placed on integrating counseling skills with pharmacotherapy while addressing the needs of clients from a variety of cultural and sub-cultural groups. The neurobiological components of abuse and addiction are examined and synthesized with social and psychological variables and risk factors. The effects of abuse and addiction on neuroanatomy and neurophysiology are analyzed to incorporate into treatment planning and program development.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Critically evaluate the psychopharmacological and psychophysiological literature.
  2. Synthesize counseling theory and techniques with pharmacological information and practices.
  3. Distinguish and describe the effects of various substances of abuse on the physical, emotional, mental, and social aspects of the individual.
  4. Formulate an individualized and realistic treatment plan by analyzing and evaluating the physiological, social and cultural, and psychological factors placing individuals at risk to abuse substances.
     

ADS557 Families & Addictive Related Issues Across the Lifespan (2 cr.)

The course explores the impact of substance abuse and other addictions on the family, individually and systemically. It seeks to offer current understanding of the impacts of developmental effects throughout the lifespan. Historical and contemporary theory and techniques used in the treatment and recovery for individuals and family systems are studied.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Assess the role and adverse effects of addiction on family members.
  2. Synthesize theories, including intergenerational, mental health, genetic, and environmental into the continuum of care with families.
  3. Evaluate, implement, and apply evidence-based treatment approaches, theories, and models currently in practice.
  4. Incorporate families and system factors into treatment planning along the continuum of care while satisfying the 12 core functions.
  5. Integrate into family practice stakeholders, community connections, support networkers, cultures, and sub-cultures along the continuum of care.

Required Practicum Experience: 6 cr.

The student completes a supervised practicum experience in both a counseling/mental health setting and in a substance disorder treatment setting. Students dually enrolled in PY and ADS programs register for the following sequence of practicum courses, consisting of a minimum of 880 hours in two semesters of 440. For those who need an additional semester to complete 880 hours, ADS715 is available.

ADS714 Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Practicum II (3 cr.)

Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This practicum must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours, with the experience divided into two semesters of 440 hours each, at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug as well as mental health treatment.

The accompanying on‐campus seminar sessions, facilitated by a dually-licensed mental health professional, provide opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined and discussed. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

This Counseling Psychology and Addiction Studies Practicum provide a combined clinical experience that meets the Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's practicum hour requirements for applications for the LADC and the LPCC licenses. A dually‐licensed mental health professional (LADC and LPCC/LP) must provide the student supervision on site. In addition, the on‐site supervisor must be on the BBHT approved list for supervision.

ADS715 Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Practicum Completion (0 cr.)

Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This practicum must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours, with the experience divided into two semesters of 440 hours each, at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug as well as mental health treatment.

The accompanying on‐campus seminar sessions, facilitated by a dually-licensed mental health professional, provide opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined and discussed. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

This Counseling Psychology and Addiction Studies Practicum provide a combined clinical experience that meets the Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's practicum hour requirements for applications for the LADC and the LPCC licenses. A dually‐licensed mental health professional (LADC and LPCC/LP) must provide the student supervision on site. In addition, the on‐site supervisor must be on the BBHT approved list for supervision.

PY713 Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Practicum I (3 cr.)

Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This practicum must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours with the experience divided into two 440 hours at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug and mental health treatment. The accompanying on-campus seminar sessions, facilitated by a dually-licensed mental health professional, provide opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined and discussed. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

This dual-licensed practicum provides a combined clinical experience that meets the Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's practicum hour requirements for applications for the LADC and the LPCC. .A dually-licensed mental professional (LADC and LPCC or LP) provides student supervision on site. In addition, the supervisor must be on the BBHT approved list for supervision.




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Daniel Lawrence

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Health and Human Services

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH116

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 238-4529

dlawren@smumn.edu