M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services

The Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota Master of Arts in Counseling and Psychological Services program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and practical experience needed to enter into a successful career.

Students are given the flexibility to explore different areas of counseling and psychological services and discover their personal areas of interest. With classes taught by professors who are experts in their field combined with a practicum experience, the program gives students knowledge of the complex nature of human behavior and social interaction. It also helps students to develop tools for assessing human problems and assisting individuals in developing greater understanding and acceptance of themselves and their relationships with others.

The program is designed to help students meet the educational requirements for Minnesota licensure for Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC). In addition, coursework is offered for the educational requirements for Minnesota Licensure for Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (LPCC). Students planning to seek licensure with the Minnesota Board of Psychology after earning a doctorate can work toward some of their educational requirements in the master's program.

Dual Program Option: M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services and Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies

Saint Mary's offers a new dual program option to prepare students to work in the field of mental health counseling as well as alcohol and drug treatment. The program is designed to help students meet the Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's educational requirements for licensure as Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LADC), Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC), and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (LPCC).

The emphasis of this dual program option is an integration of both mental health and substance use theory and skills that can be applied to the profession. Students in the dual program have the opportunity to develop skills academically and experientially to work in mental health, chemical health, dual-disorder, criminal justice, hospital, assessment, detox, residential, and outpatient settings.

This option combines the requirements of the M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services and the Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies in as few as 60 credits. An Integrated Practicum of 880 hours is based on the State of Minnesota's practicum requirements for licensure as a LPC/LPCC and LADC.

Related Programs

Counseling and Psychological Services master's students may also be interested in adding the Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies. Some students choose to apply to the Doctorate of Psychology (PsyD) in Counseling Psychology program. Master’s students may apply after they finish their master's degrees or as early entry applicants.

From Start to Finish

  • You can earn you M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services in as little as two years.
  • The program starts at the beginning of each semester in the spring, summer, and fall.

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Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities and Rochester locations.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

Core Courses 18 cr.
Assessment Courses 7 cr.
Counseling Courses 8 cr.
Additional Required Courses 9 cr.
Required Practicum Experience 6 cr.
Integration Paper and Oral Examination 0 cr.
Total 48 cr.

For those students seeking both the M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Certificate please see the dual program requirements.

Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Certificate 


Core Courses: 18 cr.

PY605 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)

The course examines characteristic changes in behavior and functioning in each stage of life from conception to death. Physical, cognitive, affective, and social bases of behavior are explored. The elements of professional writing are applied.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the systematic nature of the patterns of growth and development in all human beings.
  2. Examine the developmental tasks which the individual must master at each stage of his or her life span.
  3. Describe potential developmental psychopathologies and their impact on the normative process.
  4. Analyze the effects of social and cultural factors upon the individual's development.
  5. Apply principles of development to the understanding of individual behavioral reactions.
  6. Analyze writings from research journals and mainstream press as they relate to the course content.
  7. Apply professional writing style.

PY607 Theories of Personality (3 cr.)

Major theories of personality are covered as represented by the biophysical, intrapsychic, existential, and behavioral approaches.  The elements of professional writing are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the major personality theories and theorists.
  2. Evaluate personality theories.
  3. Identify and understand relevant issues in personality.
  4. Analyze the basic relationships between personality theory and other aspects of counseling psychology: assessment, research, and treatment.
  5. Identify a personal orientation to personality theory.
  6. Apply professional writing style.
     

PY608 Psychopathology (3 cr.)

This course examines the healthy personality, maladjustment, transient disorders, anxiety states, psychosis, mood, psychosomatic and personality disorders. The course focuses on the description of the main criteria and associated features of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnostic groups. In addition, etiology, prognosis, prevention, and treatment of the disorders are considered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the classifications and categories of the major mental disorders including the importance of incorporating a client's cultural and educational background.
  2. Apply the diagnostic criteria as defined by DSM to actual clinical cases.
  3. Analyze clinical information and use diagnostic criteria to differentiate between mental disorders.
  4. Evaluate the problems associated with diagnosing.
     

PY613 Counseling Theory and Technique (3 cr.)

Major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy are analyzed with emphasis on applications in the theoretical relationship. Professional psychological writing style is discussed in this course.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the major theoretical approaches to counseling.
  2. Acquire basic counseling skills.
  3. Apply therapeutic theory to the skills and roles used in the practice of therapy.
  4. Apply ethical principles to counseling.
  5. Apply professional psychological writing style.
  6. Articulate a personal theory of counseling and define personal style.
  7. Evaluate the cultural implications of modern psychotherapy.
  8. Apply an awareness and appreciation of diversity to counseling.
  9. Support reasoning in application of theory and technique to diagnoses and treatment interventions.
  10. Understand the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting and evaluating interventions.

PY620 Statistical Techniques and Research Methods (3 cr.)

The course provides an overview of research methods commonly used in clinical and counseling psychology. Both research methodology and statistical analysis are reviewed. The course focuses on the interpretation and understanding of research and applied statistical procedures.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand basic descriptive statistics and the fundamentals of hypothesis testing.
  2. Apply appropriate research and statistical methods to research questions.
  3. Recognize the appropriate applications of statistical findings and their limitations.
  4. Evaluate research presented in counseling/clinical psychology.
  5. Apply the fundamentals of research to counseling psychology.
     

PY641 Marriage and Family Counseling (3 cr.)

This course covers marriage and family therapy theories, their historical and cultural contexts and their application to family therapy process.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply understanding of the major theoretical/conceptual frameworks of the family field, the historical roots, key concepts, and assumptions.
  2. Evaluate couple, marriage and family dilemmas using major models of marriage and family therapy.
  3. Analyze and evaluate the relationships between major conceptual frameworks and therapy models.
  4. Apply understanding of diversity and multiculturalism in one's own developing model of marriage and family therapy.
  5. Utilize professional databases and other professional resources in applying, analyzing, and evaluating the literature of the field, including efficacy research.
  6. Create and articulate one's own developing model of marriage and family therapy.
  7. Analyze the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting and evaluating interventions.

Assessment Courses: 7 cr.

Please note: Students take PY621, PY631, and either PY632 or PY633.

PY621 Psychological Assessment (3 cr.)

This course investigates the principles and history of psychological testing, both individual and group, and assessment. Theories of measurement and selected psychological tests and inventories are covered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the assumptions, basic statistics, and issues regarding psychological testing.
  2. Understand the major tests in ability, personality, and vocational assessment and how these are used to assess client's strengths, attributes, and problems.
  3. Evaluate psychological tests on the basis of accepted assessment criteria and relevant research.
     

PY631 Personality Assessment: Adolescent and Adult (2 cr.)

The course examines and compares various methods of personality assessment of adolescents and adults, including standardized tests, behavioral analyses, and interview techniques.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the history, purpose, and current research of objective and projective personality measures.
  2. Evaluate the results of personality measures to gain knowledge regarding a client's strengths, attributes, and problems, and be able to use this information to provide reasoning and support of clinical diagnosis and treatment interventions.
  3. Integrate information gained from clinical observation, interview, and personality measures and communicate this information verbally as well as in a written report.
     

PY632 Child Assessment (2 cr.)

The course provides a detailed overview of various methods used in assessing social, intellectual, and personality development of children including standardized testing, behavioral ratings, observations, and interview techniques. Practical problems occurring in child assessment are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the definitions of personality, emotional and behavior problems, developmental stages, and contexts in describing personality characteristics of children.
  2. Understand the development, administration, usage, limitations, and basic interpretation of behavior rating scales, projective instruments, self-report tests, ecological assessments, and structured observations.
  3. Evaluate interpretations of each of the above instruments, independently and in combination, in assessing a child's strengths, attributes, and problems that provide the reasoning in support of diagnosis and treatment interventions.
  4. Evaluate a parent and/or teacher interview to obtain background information, current situation and any problem areas for a non-referred child, and communicate this information in a written report.
  5. Administer assessment instruments to a role-played child including scoring, interpretation, and use in assessing the child's strengths, attributes, and problems, and communicate the information in a written report.
  6. Report assessment information to parents in role-play situations.

PY633 Personnel and Vocational Assessment (2 cr.)

This course includes a study of vocational and personnel assessment, including the history, theory, and current utilization of testing. The course covers testing and non-testing approaches to career assessment in a variety of settings.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze and assess a job and person and synthesize the information through interpretation and reporting.
  2. Evaluate the quality and limitation of available assessment techniques.
  3. Synthesize data relating to a person and environment.
  4. Generate reasoned inferences about a person's future performance on the job.
     

Counseling Courses: 8 cr.

PY604 Career Counseling: Theory and Procedures (2 cr.)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the history and theories of career development as well as an introduction to the procedures used in career development and lifestyle counseling. Career counseling tools and techniques are examined. The interrelationships of life roles are emphasized in career and lifestyle planning.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and differentiate the major theories of career and life development.
  2. Apply procedures used in the field of career counseling.
  3. Utilize tools and techniques commonly used in career and life development.
  4. Apply career counseling theories to practice.
  5. Utilize resources available to career counselors and their clients.
  6. Evaluate the interrelationships among work, family, and other life roles in career and lifestyle planning.

PY642 Group Therapy (2 cr.)

The course covers the history and practice of group therapy grounded in social psychology. Students study the basic tasks and methods of the group therapist, the design of effective therapy groups, and the therapeutic factors and problems commonly encountered in group therapy and counseling.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the use of groups as an intervention with individuals, families, and communities.
  2. Understand the historical development of group work.
  3. Evaluate characteristics of effective group members and leaders.
  4. Analyze group process, content, and dynamics.
  5. Apply skills in assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation for work with individuals, families, and small groups.
  6. Apply skills in facilitating the stages of group process.
  7. Incorporate professional ethics in determining appropriate group interventions and evaluating effectiveness.
  8. Develop group intervention strategies using strengths of the group and its members.
  9. Understand the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting and evaluating group interventions.

PY648 Multicultural Counseling (2 cr.)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the psychology multicultural counseling. Developmental, social, and cultural contributions of ethnic and minority groups are explored. Ethnocentrism, acculturation, communication patterns, and racial conditioning are discussed. Emphasis is placed on implications of counseling in a culturally diverse society.

Upon completion of this courses, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Implement counseling strategies and techniques appropriate for specific cultural groups.
  2. Analyze the importance of culturally diverse communication styles in a professional therapeutic environment.
  3. Plan counseling interventions incorporating an understanding of intercultural differences.
  4. Evaluate personal and professional values and ethics as related to multicultural counseling.
  5. Create a conceptual multicultural therapeutic framework.
  6. Demonstrate sensitivity to the unintended consequences of therapeutic processes that may oppress populations at risk.
  7. Analyze the influence of cultural differences in the therapeutic process.
  8. Evaluate competencies in multicultural counseling and develop a plan for growth.
     

PY665 Counseling Skills and Practice (2 cr.)

Students practice the fundamental skills associated with effective helping relationships. Counseling skill acquisition and application are emphasized. Ethics and diversity are integrated into counseling skills acquisition and application.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Acquire a repertoire of basic counseling skills.
  2. Develop an understanding of the stages of the counseling process and therapeutic relationships and to apply the counseling techniques most appropriate to each of these stages.
  3. Apply general theoretical knowledge of the counseling process and the therapeutic relationship to practical counseling skills.
  4. Develop basic skills for effective clinical interviewing, assessment, and case management.
  5. Apply basic ethical principles in client therapist relationships.
  6. Identify components of counselor self awareness that can be utilized in effective self-assessment.
  7. Apply an awareness and appreciation of diversity to counseling.
  8. Understand the significance of research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting counseling skills.
     

 

Additional Required Courses: 9 cr.

PY575 Orientation to the Profession of Counseling (1 cr.)

This course provides an orientation to the profession of counseling. The history and philosophy of the field are covered as well as the roles and settings of professional counselors. Additionally, the developmental process involved with acquiring an identity as a professional counselor is addressed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and evaluate the function and role of counselors in various professional settings.
  2. Understand a process, including the stages by which counselors develop professional identity, and then apply this understanding to analyze and assess their current level of development.
  3. Synthesize their awareness of personal characteristics, behaviors, values, attitudes, and abilities that affect performance as a counselor, both in general and specifically with the self.
  4. Evaluate the impact of ethical considerations on the practice and conduct of a professional counselor, and be able to apply this understanding to specific situations and construct appropriate approaches to ethical dilemmas.
  5. Expand their appreciation of diversity as it relates to the roles and functions of the professional counselor within various settings and apply mechanisms to support and foster continued growth.
  6. Apply professional writing skills and professional verbal expression including the accurate use of APA style.
     

PY576 Social Psychology (2 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the perspectives, research, and empirical findings of social psychology. Topics covered include self and identity, social influence, attribution theory, attitudes and attitude change, personal relationships, gender, age and race, and their application in mental health.

Upon completion of this program, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the way people think, feel, and behave in social situations.
  2. Understand how people influence, and are influenced by, others around them.
  3. Evaluate major social psychological theories.
  4. Apply these theories to the counseling process.

PY606 Psychophysiology (3 cr.)

This course examines the basic anatomy of the nervous system, the normal physiological functions of the nervous systems, the biological bases of behavior, behavioral disorders, and brain diseases. The course reviews current research on the role of biological basis of behavior.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the nervous system.
  2. Describe potential biological mechanisms of behavioral disorders and brain diseases based on an understanding of current research in the field.
  3. Apply current research in the analysis of psychological disorders.
  4. Evaluate reasons for diagnosis and treatment interventions.
  5. Describe the biological basis of selected psychological disorders.

PY625 Ethics and Professional Issues in Psychology (3 cr.)

Ethical principles and issues underlying the professional practice of psychology are examined. Attention is focused on the Ethical Principles of the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and standards of practice the related State of Minnesota statutes and rules, and current issues of concern to the field.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the practice of ethics in the domain of psychology and its distinction from legal process and rules of conduct.
  2. Formulate an individual ethical decision-making process.
  3. Apply the professional codes of ethics and other resources in decision making.
  4. Apply the Minnesota statutes and rules for psychology and counseling to clinical situations.
  5. Evaluate important trends in professional issues for psychology.
  6. Understand the cultural contexts of ethical dilemmas and think creatively in identifying appropriate interventions.

Required Practicum Experience: 6 cr.

The student completes a supervised practicum experience in a counseling or mental health setting under direct supervision. This experience consists of PY710, PY711, and PY712, a minimum of 700 hours, usually two semesters of 350 hours each. A practicum supervision seminar class must be taken concurrently.

PY students dually enrolled in PY and ADS programs register in PY713, ADS714, and ADS715, consisting of a minimum of 880 hours, two semesters of 440.

ADS714 Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Practicum II (3 cr.)

Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This practicum must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours, with the experience divided into two semesters of 440 hours each, at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug as well as mental health treatment.

The accompanying on‐campus seminar sessions, facilitated by a dually-licensed mental health professional, provide opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined and discussed. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

This Counseling Psychology and Addiction Studies Practicum provide a combined clinical experience that meets the Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's practicum hour requirements for applications for the LADC and the LPCC licenses. A dually‐licensed mental health professional (LADC and LPCC/LP) must provide the student supervision on site. In addition, the on‐site supervisor must be on the BBHT approved list for supervision.

ADS715 Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Practicum Completion (0 cr.)

Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This practicum must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours, with the experience divided into two semesters of 440 hours each, at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug as well as mental health treatment.

The accompanying on‐campus seminar sessions, facilitated by a dually-licensed mental health professional, provide opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined and discussed. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

This Counseling Psychology and Addiction Studies Practicum provide a combined clinical experience that meets the Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's practicum hour requirements for applications for the LADC and the LPCC licenses. A dually‐licensed mental health professional (LADC and LPCC/LP) must provide the student supervision on site. In addition, the on‐site supervisor must be on the BBHT approved list for supervision.

PY710 Practicum I (3 cr.)

Students work in a counseling or mental health setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist, for a minimum of 30 hours per week for a total of 350 hours. Half of the hours at the practicum site must be in counseling and other direct client services. A practicum seminar must be taken concurrently as part of the practicum requirements. The supervision seminar provides an environment for discussion of case material as well as problems and concerns that arise in the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply effective communication and therapeutic skills in professional work at practicum site.
  2. Integrate knowledge of psychological theories, assessment, research, and ethics into the practice of psychology.
  3. Integrate feedback from on-site supervision and seminar supervision into effective diagnosis, treatment interventions and therapeutic process.
  4. Apply professional perspective regarding clinical issues in the practice of psychology.
  5. Demonstrate inclusivity and multicultural perspective with clients and colleagues.
  6. Plan for final integration paper.
     

PY711 Practicum II (3 cr.)

Students work in a counseling or mental health setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist, for a minimum of 30 hours per week for a total of 350 hours. Half of the hours at the practicum site must be in counseling and other direct client services. A practicum seminar must be taken concurrently as part of the practicum requirements. The supervision seminar provides an environment for discussion of case material as well as problems and concerns that arise in the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply effective communication and therapeutic skills in professional work at practicum site.
  2. Integrate knowledge of psychological theories, assessment, research, and ethics into the practice of psychology.
  3. Integrate feedback from on-site supervision and seminar supervision into effective diagnosis, treatment interventions and therapeutic process.
  4. Apply professional perspective regarding clinical issues in the practice of psychology.
  5. Demonstrate inclusivity and multicultural perspective with clients and colleagues.
  6. Plan for final integration paper.
     

PY712 Practicum III (2 cr.)

This course is available for students to facilitate completion of practicum hours required for LPC or LPCC licensure in the State of Minnesota.  Registration in PY712 requires attendance in a seminar section or individual faculty supervision, depending on number of registrants in the semester.  Please consult the Practicum Coordinator to arrange registration.

PY713 Counseling and Psychological Services and Addiction Studies Practicum I (3 cr.)

Students work in a setting which emphasizes the treatment of individuals with addictions, alcohol and drug abuse problems, and co-occurring mental health concerns. This practicum must consist of a minimum of 880 total hours with the experience divided into two 440 hours at a site licensed by the State of Minnesota to provide alcohol and drug and mental health treatment. The accompanying on-campus seminar sessions, facilitated by a dually-licensed mental health professional, provide opportunities for discussion of case materials and concerns related to the practicum setting. Personal and professional issues relevant to the practicum experience are examined and discussed. Planning for the integration paper is introduced.

This dual-licensed practicum provides a combined clinical experience that meets the Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy's practicum hour requirements for applications for the LADC and the LPCC. .A dually-licensed mental professional (LADC and LPCC or LP) provides student supervision on site. In addition, the supervisor must be on the BBHT approved list for supervision.

Integration Paper and Oral Examination

The final requirements of the program include the following:

  1. A paper in which the student integrates his or her education, practicum, and other professional experience with a review of current professional research literature.
  2. A final one-hour oral examination based upon the integration paper.

General Electives:

Students may wish to take electives to fulfill licensure requirements or return as special students to take electives for this purpose.

PY599 Professional Psychological Writing (2 cr.)

This course provides students with an introduction to professional psychological writing and includes (a) an overview of American Psychological Association (APA) format; (b) writing experiences typical of those encountered in the coursework in the counseling and psychological services program, organized around typical professional issues, (c) writing necessary for the professional practice of psychology.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand APA Manual and writing style.
  2. Apply professional writing skills.

PY600 General Psychology (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the discipline of psychology including basic psychological processes, concepts, and methods. Major theories and contributors are studied. This course MAY BE REQUIRED for students with minimal undergraduate credit in psychology, but  cannot count toward total number of credits needed to complete the degree.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Overview major themes encompassed by the field of psychology.
  2. Take into account both the biological basis of psychology and the role of culture as pivotal in shaping basic psychological processes.
  3. Examine key conceptual orientations used by psychologists to describe psychological phenomena.
     

PY630 Advanced Research Methods (2 cr.)

In this course students develop skills in designing, conducting, and analyzing psychological research.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate different research methods.
  2. Apply the most appropriate method to a problem or question.
  3. Apply the most appropriate statistical analysis to evaluate research.
  4. Evaluate research in the field.

PY643 Humanistic/Existential Counseling Approaches (2 cr.)

The course includes a study of the basic concepts of humanistic and existential psychology, and of well known contributors to this philosophical and therapeutic approach.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the basic concepts of Existential Humanistic Psychology.
  2. Differentiate theories of the three major theorists. (Rogers, Perls, May)
  3. Evaluate the ways theory is linked to practice.
  4. Evaluate how the concepts apply to the student's own professional counseling theory.
  5. Develop skills necessary for establishing a therapeutic relationship.
     

PY644 Cognitive/Behavioral Counseling Approaches (2 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of cognitive behavioral counseling. Various forms of cognitive-behavioral therapy are reviewed with emphasis on the approaches of Beck and Ellis.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the historical overview of cognitive-behavior therapy.
  2. Analyze common elements of cognitive-behavioral techniques.
  3. Contrast cognitive based techniques with applied behavioral analysis and other forms of psychological treatment.
  4. Apply practical skills needed to perform BASIC cognitive-behavior therapy.
  5. Apply observation and feedback skills.

PY645 Introduction to Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (2 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the general principles, techniques, theory, and process of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on identifying and understanding psychodynamic principles through presentation of case material and illustrations in the process of psychotherapy.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and articulate the theoretical principles of psychodynamic psychotherapy.
  2. Understand and differentiate the principles and practice of psychodynamic from other therapeutic approaches.
  3. Apply a fundamental understanding of psychodynamic principles to case material.
     

PY654 Chemical Dependency (2 cr.)

Addiction and recovery are examined from the perspectives of the clinician and the recovering individual, including assessment, intervention, treatment, and recovery.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand chemical use, abuse, and dependency.
  2. Identify complexities and ramifications of chemical dependency and other addictions throughout the continuum of care.
  3. Analyze addictive behaviors in clients.
  4. Evaluate his/her therapeutic limitations and recognize when referral is necessary.
  5. Assess how the therapist's own defenses prevent effective recognition and intervention.
     

PY656 Psychopharmacology (2 cr.)

This course provides a comprehensive survey of the basic psychiatric conditions for which psychoactive medication represents an appropriate intervention strategy. It is intended to be an introduction to the field and is designed to provide a working knowledge base to enable students to more competently address the experiences of their clients taking prescribed psychiatric medications.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the organization of the central nervous system, the major structures of the brain, and the neurotransmitters and their receptors.
  2. Understand the different classifications of psychotropic medications.
  3. Differentiate between medications and their application to diagnostic groups.
     

PY657 Aging: A Behavioral Sciences Perspective (2 cr.)

This course presents several theories of adult development and outlines broad issues that the presently old experience. Personal issues regarding aging are identified.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify major developmental themes of adult development.
  2. Apply a basic theoretical framework.
  3. Examine their own attitudes toward aging.
  4. Understand the experience of aging from an older person's point of view.
     

PY658 Human Sexuality (2 cr.)

This course covers theories of sexuality, the role of attitudes and values, and the importance of self-awareness. A variety of perspectives (ethical, psychological, legal, theological) related to clinical and educational settings are discussed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Discuss sexual issue and topics in appropriate professional contexts.
  2. Understand boundaries, counter-transference, values, biases, and attitudes affecting clinical work with clients with various sexual concerns.
  3. Demonstrate skills necessary to write a complete sexual history.
  4. Develop a treatment plan for a sexuality related problem.
  5. Understand key concepts related to child and adolescent sexuality, aging, transgender issues, homosexualities, HIV, S.T.Is, birth control, sexual victimization, and sexual abusers.
     

PY659 Brief Therapy (2 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the methods of brief therapy. The focus is on client strengths rather than pathology and on the empowering of clients to develop solutions to problems.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the assumptions behind brief therapy strategies.
  2. Apply strategies currently used in brief therapy.
  3. Utilize personal creativity in brief therapy.
  4. Evaluate the role of brief therapy in managed care.
  5. Analyze strengths and limitations in providing brief therapy.
     

PY669 Advanced Psychopathology (2 cr.)

The course includes a detailed study of major areas of psychology to enhance learning from previous courses. Topics include disorders involving mood, anxiety, personality, and psychosis, stress-related and disruptive behaviors. Etiology/underlying psychopathology, differential diagnosis, psychosocial difficulties, treatment issues, and ethical dilemmas are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate etiology psychopathology, conceptual complexities and treatment methods of the major areas of psychopathology.
  2. Apply knowledge of how personal and psychosocial difficulties experienced by individuals and those around them, can affect the development and maintenance of psychopathology.
  3. Analyze and synthesize professional and ethical issues related to diagnosis and treatment of psychopathology.

PY674 Living with Experiences of Trauma (2 cr.)

This course covers a spectrum of human responses to traumatic experiences. Conceptual understanding of the therapeutic needs of trauma survivors are emphasized. Particular types of traumatic experiences and the impact of trauma on psychological, interpersonal, and societal systems are explored.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the immediate impact and ongoing life changes related to traumatic experiences.
  2. Analyze responses to stories of trauma in preparation for listening and responding to clients.
  3. Integrate conceptual and experiential understanding of the effects of trauma in people's lives

PY701 Supervising Counselors and Psychotherapists: Theories of Supervision (1 cr.)

This course examines theoretical models and related approaches in supervision of counselors and psychotherapists. Goals of supervision, relationships, and roles emphasize theoretical conceptualization and application of theory to supervision structure, dynamics and process. Opportunities to examine one's own developmental learning needs and style in supervision are provided.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to do the following:

  1. Explain the supervisory process from a variety of theoretical models.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking skills to conceptualize supervisory events and process.
  3. Apply various supervision models according to developmental level of the supervisees.

PY702 Supervising Counselors and Psychotherapists: Clinical Skills and Practice in Supervision (1 cr.)

In this course, students learn and practice fundamental skills associated with the effective supervision of counselors and psychotherapists. The acquisition and application of supervision skills are emphasized. Ethics and diversity issues are addressed in the context of acquiring and applying supervision skills.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate a repertoire of basic supervision skills.
  2. Describe and employ supervision techniques and strategies that facilitate positive supervision outcomes and relationships.
  3. Comprehend how theories of supervision relate to and inform supervision practices.
  4. Apply appropriate supervision skills to a variety of supervision events and situations.
  5. Explain the similarities and differences between basic counseling skills and basic supervision skills.
     

 

PY703 Issues, Ethics, & Research in Supervision (1 cr.)

This course examines some of the primary issues, ethical challenges, and research areas focused on the supervisory process from both the supervisor and supervisee standpoint. Issues addressed include multicultural awareness, transference and counter-transference, sexual and other attractions, and gender misunderstandings. Students also explore the components of critical thinking as it applies to the supervisory process. Opportunities to examine the self in the supervisory process are provided.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand major research and ethical issues in supervision.
  2. Apply ethical principles to supervision.
  3. Apply professional psychological writing style.
  4. Articulate a personal theory of supervision and define personal style.
  5. Evaluate the cultural implications of supervision.
  6. Apply an awareness and appreciation of diversity to supervision.
  7. Analyze current supervision process and needs, and articulate a process to continue development as a supervisor.
     

PY704 Clinical Treatment Planning (2 cr.)

This course examines the therapeutic process of clinical treatment planning. Emphasis is placed on the integration of assessing client needs and readiness, case conceptualization, counseling techniques and strategies, treatment models, and therapeutic relationships. Current professional issues about use of evidence based treatments and culturally competent interventions are examined in the context of measurable and meaningful treatment goals.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Use assessment information to develop a case-sensitive treatment plan that accounts for clinical setting, treatment format, client factors, and therapist competence.
  2. Utilize basic understanding of normal development, psychopathology, and client's in-session behavior in the process of conceptualization.
  3. Abstract salient features of a case from which to draw hypotheses, inferences, and prognoses; and develop measurable treatment goals.
  4. Demonstrate ability to think divergently about possible effects of different interventions, balancing current best-practice with culturally competent approaches.
  5. Translate case sensitive treatment plans into language and concepts congruent with professional expectations of reimbursement entities.
     

 

PY705 Evaluation Methodologies (2 cr.)

This course examines a range of evaluation methodologies to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of a range of clinical interventions, including individual and group therapy and programmatic services. The course focuses on critically evaluating and utilizing information from existing research literature, implementing and evaluating best practice guidelines and evidence-based practices (EBP), and conducting original evaluation projects.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the outcome research literature to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of clinical interventions.
  2. Locate, evaluate and implement evidence-based practices (EBP) for the assessment and treatment of mental disorders.
  3. Develop and implement single-subject (N of 1) research studies.
  4. Develop and implement program evaluation studies.
     

 

PY706 Writing for Professional Practice (1 cr.)

This course provides students with information they need to do writing required of professionals in the field of psychology. Students practice writing casenotes and treatment plans.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the information expected by community standards of practice that would be included in casenotes, treatment plans, and other psychological writing.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to write casenotes and treatment plans.
  3. Analyze the ethical implications involved in psychological writing.
     

PY707 Advanced Multicultural Counseling (1 cr.)

This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed in the first multicultural counseling course, PY648. Students practice advanced multicultural counseling skills intended to develop multicultural counseling competencies applicable to specific populations. Students have the opportunity to focus their learning on a specific ethnic group.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Utilize knowledge of sociopolitical histories, cultural practices, and dynamics when counseling African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Latinos.
  2. Identify and demonstrate appropriate communication style patterns for specific cultural groups.
  3. Demonstrate counseling interventions that incorporate an understanding of intercultural differences.
  4. Gain specific expertise with one ethnic group based on research and practice that is based on professional objectives.
  5. Conceptualize and articulate personal and professional awareness, values, and ethics as related to multicultural counseling.
  6. Demonstrate self-reflection skills related to unintentional consequences of therapeutic process on multicultural populations.
  7. Identify specific cross-cultural competencies, standards, and applied skills that are consistent with culturally competent mental health workers.
     

PY709 Integrative Wellness: Using Mind-Body and Psychotherapeutic Approaches for Healing (1 cr.)

This course covers mind-body and creative approaches to clinical practice in counseling psychology.  Practice and scholarly research are used to explore clinical interventions including mindfulness meditation, guided imagery, relaxation techniques, creative writing, and creative/art based interventions to promote healing.  The course has an experiential component through which students practice the various interventions being studied.

PY714 Supervising Counselors and Psychotherapists: A Comprehensive Approach (Rochester only) (3 cr.)

In this course, students learn and apply theoretical models and fundamental skills for supervision of counselors and psychotherapists.  Goals of supervision and relationship roles are discussed and opportunities to examine one's own developmental learning needs and styles are provided.  Primary issues, ethical challenges, and research areas focused on the supervisory process from both the supervisor and supervisee standpoint are addressed, including multicultural awareness, transference and counter-transference, sexual and other attractions and gender misunderstandings.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking skills to conceptualize supervisory events and processes.
  2. Integrate current research on effective supervisor qualities and developmental level of supervisees according to various supervision theory models.
  3. Describe and employ supervision techniques and strategies that facilitate positive supervision outcomes and relationships.
  4. Explain the similarities and differences between basic counseling skills and basic supervision skills.
  5. Apply ethical principles to supervision.
  6. Apply professional psychological writing style.
  7. Articulate a personal theory of supervision and define personal style.
  8. Evaluate the cultural implications of supervision.
  9. Analyze current supervision process and needs, and articulate a process to continue development as a supervisor.

PY716 Practice in Counseling Skills (1 cr.)

This course builds on the knowledge and skills developed in the first skills course in the program.  The course provides an opportunity for students to further develop their counseling skills and apply an understanding of the influence of race, culture, gender, as well as self-of-the-therapist in therapy.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:                              

  1. Demonstrate ability to apply counseling skills.
  2. Evaluate and apply appropriate techniques to specific stages of counseling.
  3. Evaluate and apply ethical and legal principles to case presentation and simulations.
  4. Apply understanding of race, culture, and gender influences in counseling.
  5. Apply significant research evidence and community standards of practice in selecting counseling skills.

Representative Electives

The following titles are representative of short (one-credit) general elective courses available. See the semester course schedule for current offerings.

PY649 Psychology and the Law (1 cr.)

This course presents an introduction and overview of the interface between psychology and the law. Topics such as criminal responsibility, police psychology, and mental health law are addressed.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the common areas that psychology and the law intersect.
  2. Analyze the roles and procedures involving psychologists in the court system.
  3. Apply mental health law to psychological practice.
  4. Evaluate the complex ethical issues inherent within psychology and the law.
     

PY668 Introduction to Correctional Psychology (1 cr.)

This course presents an overview of correctional psychology. Topics range from common psychopathology found among correctional populations to divergent roles that correctional psychologists may undertake.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand common professional roles and duties within correctional psychology.
  2. Evaluate the wide variety of personality disorders and major mental illnesses that are found within correctional populations.
  3. Analyze major treatment modalities that correctional psychologists employ.
  4. Analyze complex legal and ethical issues faced by correctional psychologists.
     

PY671 Child Sexual Abuse (1 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the current research and practice in the recognition, evaluation, and treatment of sexual abuse of children. Topics to be included are history and prevalence, characteristics, evaluation, treatment, and ethical considerations.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the cultural context within which current sexual abuse offenses can be viewed.
  2. Identify common characteristics of children who have been sexually abused.
  3. Describe the effects of sexual abuse.
  4. Understand the prevalence of sexual abuse in the United States.
  5. Differentiate between appropriate and inappropriate interviewing techniques of a child who is suspected of being abused.
  6. Evaluate treatment possibilities for a child who has been abused.
     

PY672 Employee Assistance Counseling: Theory and Practice (1 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to and an overview of the field of employee assistance. Emphasis is placed on the role of the counselor. Topics include the history, structure, and purpose of employee assistance; an introduction to employee assistance professional organizations; and an introduction to current employee assistance enterprises.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify characteristics of an effective Employee Assistance Program (EAP).
  2. Understand the historical background of EAP.
  3. Differentiate the various types of employee assistance professional organizations and understand the certification process for becoming a Certified Employee Assistance Professional (CEAP).
  4. Understand the roles of a practicing Employee Assistance Professional.
  5. Examine the role of the counselor in light of the purposes of EAP counseling.
  6. Understand Management Consultations, Critical Incident Stress Debriefings (CISDs), and Department of Transportation (DOT) testing and referral process.
  7. Relate counseling theory, social theory, and philosophy to EAP.
     

PY673 Clinical Use of Hypnosis (1 cr.)

This class provides an introduction to the basic concepts of hypnosis, corrects misconceptions about hypnosis, and presents the more common uses of hypnosis in the practice of psychology.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Develop basic skills in inducing a state of hypnosis in a cooperative subject, including the demonstration of two or more induction techniques.
  2. Implement methods of inducing self-hypnosis.
  3. Understand the application of hypnosis in the fields of psychotherapy, habit control, pain management and relaxation.
  4. Apply hypnosis to chosen areas of interest.
     

PY675 Clinical Issues: Bereavement (1 cr.)

This course covers the stages of grieving and the reorganization of self and social systems in the bereavement process. The effects of particular types of losses and factors affecting the bereavement process are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the psychosocial needs of people who are experiencing loss and bereavement.
  2. Apply the characteristic concepts and stages of the bereavement process to individuals and interpersonal situations.
  3. Differentiate between various kinds of grief: anticipatory, acute, complicated ("pathological"), unresolved, new grief, ambiguous grief.
  4. Apply guidelines and techniques for facilitating clients in resolving grief
     

PY679 Psychology of HIV/AIDS (1 cr.)

This course presents information about the biology and clinical course of the illness and the attendant psychosocial, case management, special population, and self-care issues. The course also focuses on working with gay and bisexual men.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand critical information about the epidemiological, immunological, neuropsychological, and medical treatment aspects of HIV infection required for conducting effective psychotherapy and counseling for persons infected and affected by HIV disease.
  2. Demonstrate the appropriate mix of counseling, psychotherapy, and case management skills to address the complex array of psychosocial needs of persons living at various stages of HIV disease.
  3. Demonstrate treatment planning skills and a personal understanding of underlying concerns and attitudes, including cultural context, involved in working with people infected and affected by HIV in the course of devising a treatment plan.
  4. Respond appropriately to the issues of grief and multiple loss that arise in the course of mental health treatment for people with HIV.
  5. Respond appropriately to legal and ethical issues involved in the mental health treatment of people with HIV disease.
     

PY680 Stress Management (1 cr.)

This course offers participants an opportunity to understand stress and stress management concepts, and to develop skills to assist themselves and others. The focus is on exploring how the mind and body interact to create a stress response and on learning specific tools to regulate this response. Current research, techniques, and applications are considered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the concepts of stress and stress management.
  2. Utilize skills in stress management.
  3. Analyze the interaction of body and mind in the creation of a stress response.
     

PY683 Theory & Applications of Sport Psychology (1 cr.)

This course explores the theories and principles of applied sport psychology within the mission and vision of Saint Mary's University. Psychological issues surrounding participation in sports including obligatory exercise and addictive behavior, emotional cognitive distress of an athlete, effects of injury, and parental pressure on youth sport participants are explored. Knowledge gleaned from this course may be applied in counseling practice, education, or coaching.




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Daniel Lawrence

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Health and Human Services

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH116

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 238-4529

dlawren@smumn.edu

Daniel Lawrence
Molly Bigelow

Rochester Center - Enrollment Counselor

Rochester Campus, RC

Campus Box: # 53

(507) 457-8602

mbigelow@smumn.edu

Advises all students interested in enrolling in the following programs at Saint Mary's:

Molly Bigelow