Lasallian Core Traditions Program

The Lasallian Core Traditions Program partially fulfills the general education requirements for graduation and is the program that the majority of students in the undergraduate college choose.

The Lasallian Honors Program is also available.

This core provides a common Lasallian educational experience for students and is grounded in the university mission and the Lasallian dispositions of faith, zeal, service, and community. These four commitments underscore the ultimate aim of the program: to awaken and nurture the intellectual, spiritual, and personal development of learners in preparation for lives of service and commitment to social justice.

Program Details

The First-Year Seminar helps new students transition to university life while also beginning to develop their Lasallian identity as educated, competent, and compassionate members of society.

In the second-year course, students hone their writing skills through the study of important texts on the virtuous life from within the Western tradition, including selections from the life and work of Saint John Baptist de La Salle.

In the junior year, students explore issues of social justice inherent in our emerging global society, while at the same time refining the knowledge, skills, and Lasallian Catholic values needed to evaluate and respond appropriately to different perspectives on real world issues, problems, and themes. 

In the senior Capstone course, students explore the historical and philosophical origins of our American culture and examine how these origins affect our understanding of our work, our relationships, our faith, and our citizenship. The purpose of this forward-looking Capstone course is to prepare students to live out the Lasallian charism in contemporary America and the world.

Degree Requirements

Lasallian Core Traditions Courses

All of the following:

LCT140 First-Year Seminar (3 cr.)

First-Year Seminar provides new students at Saint Mary's University with an integrated, initial academic experience that enables them to successfully begin the process of developing a Lasallian identity as educated and compassionate adults committed to ethical participation in our global society. To facilitate a practical transition from high school to college, emphasis is placed on developing the academic skills and attitudes necessary for students to think critically about those questions that help shape their identity as young adults: who am I?, what can I become?, and how can I become that person?

LCT225 Perspectives on the Good Human Life (3 cr.)

This course, taken in the sophomore year, moves beyond the first-year seminar focus of self-identity to explore various historical and contemporary perspectives on living life well. In the spirit of De La Salle's commitment to serving others and his recognition of the value of those less fortunate, this course challenges students to examine how their own pursuit of the good life fits into a larger social and historical picture. As a writing-intensive course, Perspectives allows students the opportunity to develop their writing skills from the initial stages of critical reading to drafting and revision.

LCT375 Global Issues (3 cr.)

Global Issues, taken during a student's junior year, is designed to cultivate an understanding of the complexities inherent in our emerging global society and the ethical issues confronting them as members of a culturally diverse world. Each section of the course examines one or more specific problems or issues emerging from a global context by considering the issue(s) from multiple perspectives and with special attention toward the Lasallian concern for social justice.

LCT475 Capstone (3 cr.)

Capstone, taken during the senior year, focuses on the historical and philosophical origins of American Culture and character.  The course explores how these origins affect our understanding of our work, our relationships and family lives, our faith, and our citizenship.  The purpose of the course is to prepare students to live out the Lasallian charism in contemporary America and the world.

Aesthetics (AE)

ID160 and one additional course from:

AR101 Art Appreciation (3 cr.)

Art Appreciation is intended for non-majors who want a better understanding of the role of visual art in our culture. A combination of lectures, slides, films and discussion are used to enable students to appreciate works of art. Topics include a study of the elements of art and the principles of design, two-dimensional and three-dimensional media, and an overview of the history of western art.

AR103 Art Foundations I (3 cr.)

Art Foundations I is a study of the principles and elements of two- and three-dimensional design. It is also an introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting for the professional. The course is conducted in a studio-lecture format.

AR104 Art Foundations II (3 cr.)

Foundations II focuses on design theory based on three dimensional space, plus time and motion studies. Carving, woodworking, and basic mixed media are introduced.

AR122 Drawing I (3 cr.)

Drawing I requires no art background. Studio assignments include a variety of subject matter, media and techniques with emphasis on visual perception and awareness.

AR165 Art, History and Theology in the Italian Renaissance: A Travel Course (4 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to study Italian art history, political history, and theology, which were at the center of Italian Renaissance culture, and to reflect on the importance of these ideas in shaping modern thought. The course is designed to help students to develop their critical thinking, writing and oral communication skills, and creative perspectives to enable them to get the most out of their international experience. Travel and study in Rome, Florence, and Vicchio will be the focus of this course.

AR211 Ceramics I (3 cr.)

Ceramics I is an introductory course that combines instruction in hand building and the potter's wheel. The emphasis is placed on methods of construction, surface decoration, glazing, and firing techniques.

AR260 Intro to Italian Art and Culture (3 cr.)

This elective course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to study Italian art history, architecture, religion, culture, and civilization and to incorporate some of these ideas about art, politics, and religion that have been important in the shaping of the modern world. This course helps students develop critical thinking skills and creative perspectives from an international experience. Travel and study in Rome, Florence, Venice, and the surrounding Veneto region of northern Italy are the focus of this course.

AR360 Art History (4 cr.)

Art History surveys the history of Western Art from the Classical Antiquity period to contemporary times. It includes the study of painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts. The course is designed to assist students to gain an overview of the major stylistic periods and artists of the Western visual tradition, explore how visual art relates culturally, sociologically and philosophically to the societies within which it arises, learn the basic vocabulary of art philosophy, style and method, and carry out basic art historical research.

AR370 Philosophy of Art (3 cr.)

This is an interdisciplinary course which explores the relationship between philosophy of art or aesthetics and the developments in art history. The course involves a study of traditional and contemporary philosophical theories of art, an examination of selected figures and movements in art history, and an analysis of the vital interrelationship between the two disciplines of philosophy and art.

MU150 Experiencing Music (3 cr.)

This course is designed to stimulate interest in and enjoyment of music from its beginnings through medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and 20th century styles, including various styles of non-Western music. This course is required for music majors and minors and is also a general education aesthetics content area course open to all students with an interest in music.

MU171 Piano Class (3 cr.)

This course provides a basic introduction to music and the keyboard. Students learn to read music in treble and bass clefs, become familiar with basic music vocabulary and symbols, and develop keyboard skills. Students also study the history of piano music and piano playing in order to deepen their understanding of the instrument. This course is open to all students with an interest in music, and fulfills the general education aesthetics content area course requirement.

MU255 Jazz History (3 cr.)

This course examines unique Western and non-Western aspects of jazz and its relationship to the Afro-American culture. It is intended to give students an introduction to various styles of jazz from its beginning in the early 1900s to the present. Students study the cultural context of jazz, what to listen for, and some basic aspects of how it is performed.

MU341 Music History I (3 cr.)

This course is a writing intensive study of music history covering ancient, medieval, renaissance, and baroque western art music. A basic understanding of the history of western civilization is expected.

MU342 Music History II (3 cr.)

This course is a continuation of MU341. It is a writing intensive study of music history continuing through the classical, romantic and contemporary periods.

PH370 Philosophy of Art (3 cr.)

This interdisciplinary course explores the relationship between philosophy of art or aesthetics and developments in art history. The course involves a study of traditional and contemporary theories of art, an examination of selected figures and movements in art history, and an analysis of the vital interrelationship between the two disciplines of philosophy and art.

SP414 Themes in Latin American Cinema (3 cr.)

This course offers an introduction to the academic study of film as a form of art.  Through a study of the film viewing and writing process, students learn how to express themselves clearly and creatively using a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language. 

TA160 Theatre Appreciation (3 cr.)

An introductory study of drama and theatre of the past and present, the course is designed for the student who has no previous background in theatre. The course is directed toward a greater appreciation and understanding of the theatre in our culture. (Not open to majors.)

TA302 Modern Movies (3 cr.)

An introductory study of important contemporary films for students who wish to learn how to understand and evaluate popular cinema. Students are introduced to the history of film-making as well as basic film techniques. Movies are screened, discussed and evaluated in terms of content, style and intent. Students have the opportunity to react and formulate their own aesthetic preferences through a series of written and oral responses to the films. This course satisfies an Aesthetic general education requirement.

Cultural Traditions (CT)

One course from:

AN300 Introduction to Anthropology (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of human culture. Topics: anthropology as an academic discipline, nature of human language, human culture, history of anthropological thought, and human social organizations.

DA380 Dance History (3 cr.)

This course provides an in-depth survey of the history of concert dance forms, including ballet, modern dance, jazz dance and tap dance. Discussion, assignments and text provide background concerning the influences of social and world dance on these ever-changing dance forms. A research paper is a requirement for this course.

ED303 From Investigation to Action: Marginalization in Latin America and the United States (3 cr.)

Investigation of issues of power, inequality, and empowerment of the dispossessed in Latin America and the United States.  The course will include juxtaposition of texts, photos, interviews, and lyrics to examine issues of human rights, access to resources, and consumption.  It includes a personally-designed service learning experience, either in Bolivia or in the United States.

GE305 Introduction to Geography (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of geography, with special emphasis on linking geography's basic concepts to the realms and major regions of the world.

H111 Global History to 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to world history from the origins of civilization to 1500. The course focuses on the societies and cultures of Eurasia: Southwest Asia (the Middle East), India, Persia, China, Greece and Rome, Europe, and Africa, and the Americas. Major themes include the founding and development of the world's great religions; political ideas, institutions and practices; law and legal institutions; society and economy; war, conquest and empire; the encounters between cultures; and the richness and diversity of human experience and aspiration in the foundational eras of the world's civilizations. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H113 U.S. History to 1865 (3 cr.)

This course offers an introductory survey of the multicultural history of the United States from the earliest human settlement around 13,000 B.C. to the end of the Civil War in 1865. It introduces students to the diversity of peoples that came to inhabit North America, such as Native Americans, early colonizers from a variety of European nations, slaves from Africa, and the various waves of immigrants that enriched the American population prior to the Civil War. It introduces students to the various historical periods historians recognize, such as the pre-Columbian era, the Colonial period, the era of the American Revolution, the Early Republic, antebellum America, and the era of sectional conflict and the Civil War. The course also introduces students to many of the people, voices, ideas, beliefs, events, and larger historical developments that shaped American history. And it emphasizes the tension that has existed throughout American history between, on the one hand, the forces that work to create a single, unified country out of this multiplicity of cultures, and, on the other hand, the forces that threaten to undermine and tear apart the great republican experiment that is the United States.

H114 U.S. History since 1865 (3 cr.)

This course offers an overview of the history of the United States between the end of the Civil War and the present day.  It emphasizes broad developments that transformed American life:  the transformation of a rural-agrarian into an urban-industrial society; the shift from "isolationism" to internationalism; the rise of liberalism, the growth of the federal government, and the development of the military-industrial complex; the rise of a conservative movement and the subsequent polarization of American politics and life, especially as seen in the Cultural Wars; and the ubiquitous role technology played in these developments.  In addition, the course looks at these transformations through the lenses of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, and class, in order to investigate how these broad developments affected people in an increasingly diverse nation.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

H305 Race, Slavery, and Revolution in the Atlantic World (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the exchange of goods, people, and ideas between Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1900, with special emphasis on ideas about race and the social structures they engendered, the triangular trade in the Atlantic basin, the transatlantic slave trade, slave rebellions, and the political revolutions and religious upheavals that transformed many slave societies and ultimately ended plantation slavery in the Atlantic World. The course also pays attention to race and slavery prior to the transatlantic slave trade, the racial dimensions of national independence movements, the trans-Saharan slave trade to northern Africa, abolitionist movements, and the diverse cultures of the black diaspora.

H315 American–East Asian Relations (3 cr.)

The aim of this course is to do three things: provide a general introduction to the history of relations between the United States and the major countries of the East Asian cultural sphere (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam); explore the changing images Americans have had of the peoples of these nations, the Chinese and Japanese in particular; and draw connections between both these themes and the experiences of Asian–American during the last century-and-a-half of American history. Special attention is paid to crisis in American–East Asian relations, such as: the Boxer Uprising and the 1900 siege of Beijing, World War II and the Occupation of Japan that followed, the Vietnam War, and contemporary disputes over issues of human rights in China (stemming from the June 4th Massacre of 1989). Through classroom lectures, course readings, and a critical viewing of a variety of visual materials (including excerpts from newsreels, newscasts, and feature films) students look at the process by which crisis involving American interests alter or give new life to enduring Western stereotypes concerning East Asia. A major goal of the course is to provide students with the analytical tools and historical background necessary to put future crises in U.S.–East Asian relations, as well as the American media's coverage of these crises, in perspective.

H321 From Romanitas to Vikings: The Early Middle Ages (3 cr.)

The first half of a two-semester course sequence that covers the period of history from the later Roman Empire to the demise of the Carolingian Empire.  The course is organized around two ideas.  The first is the creation of Western civilization out of three distinct traditions:  the Greco-Roman, the Judeo-Christian, and the Germanic.  Thus, the early Middle Ages were a time of intense change as this amalgam took centuries to develop.  The second idea is persistence, for example, of the Latin language and the idea of the Roman Empire.  Both ideas reach a temporary synthesis in the guise of Charlemagne, a Frank who is crowned as Emperor of the Romans by the pope.  At the same time the Vikings and the Arabs represent significant challenges to Romanitas or Romanness, and accelerate the internal divisions that undermined the Carolingian monasticism, the creation of barbarian kingdom, the development of the early Byzantine Empire, and the growth of a feudal society.  These topics are explored in particular by close readings of primary sources.

H322 The Age of Holy War and Reason: The High Middle Ages (3 cr.)

The second half of a two-semester course that covers the period of history from approximately 1000 to approximately 1400.  Out of the chaos of the tenth century emerged a mature medieval civilization that still exhibited some paradoxical tendencies.  These include the emergence of the concept of Holy War or Crusade under the leadership of a reformed papacy together with a vigorous revival of classical culture that culminated in the scholastic synthesis.  Other topics include feudal monarchy, chivalry, the revival of towns, and the establishment of the mendicant orders of Franciscans and Dominicans, culminating in the disasters of war, plague, and revolt that mark the fourteenth century and that foretold the end of the Middle Ages.  These topics are explored in particular by close readings of primary sources.

H335 American Environmental History (3 cr.)

The course introduces students to environmental history as an academic discipline and teaches American history through the lens of that discipline. It emphasizes the reciprocal and symbiotic relationship between human beings that historically have occupied North America and their surroundings—the natural environment as these human beings encountered and transformed them. As such, the course introduces students to the various strands in environmental thought, environmental science, environmental practices, religious belief as it pertains to the relationship between human beings and the environment, and environmental politics that have shaped the history of North America and the United States. The course also familiarizes students with the practices of historiography and the specific historiography of environmental history.

H390 Modern China (3 cr.)

This is a survey of Chinese history from the rise of the Qing Dynasty in the mid-17th century to the protest and repression of 1989. It discusses some of the main social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual features of the "traditional" Chinese world the first Qing emperors ruled. It also covers the way this world changed as China experienced a series of convulsive events, including both threats from abroad and domestic rebellions and revolutions.

SP331 Civilization/Culture Spain (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the civilizations and cultures which have existed on the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. The students study the political, social, artistic, and intellectual evolution of Spain through a series of texts, images, and videos.

SP332 Civilization/Culture Latin America (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the diversity of the Hispanic world. Through a series of texts and videos the students address several important social, political, and cultural themes.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

Faith Traditions One (FT1)

One course from:

TH112 History of the Bible (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible inspires faith for billions of persons worldwide and is a best-seller every year. In this course the Bible is studied as a product of God and of people. Students consider how the Bible actually emerged in the lives of Jews and Christians as well as how it sustains Christianity today. Typical areas of study are the Bible's literary forms, historical contexts, and faithful heroes.

TH113 Bible and Belief (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible inspires faith for billions of persons worldwide and is a best-seller every year. In this course the Bible is studied as a means of God's revelation. Special focus is given to how different denominations vary in their respective use of the book as a source of divine revelation. Also considered is how broad assumptions about the nature of the text shape various theologies and how issues like inspiration, myth and ethics are determined both from and for the reading of the Bible.

TH114 Religions of the Book (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible inspires faith for billions of persons worldwide. In this course the Bible is studied as an example of the world's Scriptures. Comparisons and contrasts are drawn between both the content and the use of Scripture in Jewish, Christian and Muslim denominations. Attention can be given to some of the uses of Scripture in eastern world views, for example, Hinduism and Buddhism.

TH115 The Mystery of Salvation (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible leads to Christ, the mystery of salvation. This course is divided into four parts corresponding to the Catechism of the Catholic Church: professing our faith, celebrating our faith, living our faith, and praying our faith. The primary sources are Sacred Scripture and the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Faith Traditions Two (FT2)

One course from:

H333 The Destruction of Christian Unity: The Reformation (3 cr.)

The Reformation refers to the sixteenth-century religious movement that culminated in both the reform of the Latin Church and its division.  The course surveys the state of the Church before Luther, a time of great upheaval with popes in Avignon, the Great Schism, and conciliarism.  It balances a study of the theological issues such as justification, Scripture, and the sacraments, that defined the magisterial Protestant Reformation in its Lutheran, Calvinist, and Anglican traditions, with its Catholic counterpart associated with the Council of Trent, a reformed papacy, and new religious orders such as the Jesuits, and  Brothers of the Christian Schools.  Special emphasis is placed on the longer and shorter intellectual, political, and social causes of the Reformation, some of which can be traced back to ideas, often heretical, found in the early Church and to medieval scholastic speculation.

TH250 Christian View of the Human Person (3 cr.)

This course explores the set of Catholic Christian doctrines and interpretation surrounding the question "what does it mean to be a human person?" for example, the creation to the image of God, sin, redemption, sacramentality, and vocation. There is a focus on modern questions of the mind, conscience, embodiment, gender, and sexuality.

TH260 Foundations in Catholic Theology (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Catholic theology that explores fundamental tenets, e.g., the Triune God, the creation of the cosmos and humanity, sin, grace, salvation, revelation, sanctification, and sacramental imagination. Students attend to the development of these creedal doctrines building on their biblical understanding of how these doctrines frame the human experience through a coherent system of thought, which addresses the challenges that modernity and post-modernity pose to the Christian world view. Students who have taken TH209 should not take this course.

TH270 Christianity in a Global Context (3 cr.)

Through comparison and contrast, students define and articulate how the Christian, especially Roman Catholic, world view relates to those of others. Prior to such comparisons students focus on being able to articulate the basic world view of several mainstream religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and the religions of the Far East, especially Shinto, Dao and Confucian thought.

Human Systems (HS)

One course from:

CJ111 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 cr.)

This course is intended to provide the students with an introduction to the historical, political and social aspects of the criminal justice system. Students explore issues that impact the overall functioning criminal justice system, with a focus on the three main components of the system: police, courts and corrections.

COM111 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 cr.)

A study of the history, production methods, and social and economic factors of the mass media. This course gives students an understanding of print media, broadcast media and public relations by analyzing the technical development and social impact of media.

EC261 Principles of Microeconomics (3 cr.)

A traditional introduction to the principles of microeconomics, concentrating on behavior of the household and the firm. The course analyzes factors determining prices, production and allocation of economic resources. Current issues are emphasized.

HS111 Introduction to Human Services (3 cr.)

Students trace the development of human services as a profession, identify employment options for human services professionals, and examine the various social problems to which human services professionals respond, including but not limited to child abuse, domestic violence, homelessness, immigration, mental illness, needs of the frail elderly, and substance abuse.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

PY220 Abnormal Psychology (4 cr.)

This course investigates the dynamics of abnormal behavior. Disorders manifested in childhood and adolescence, eating disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, somatoform disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, substance abuse, sexual disorder, and dependence, violence and abuse, and personality disorders are studied. Etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, research, prevention and therapy are considered. The interactions among biological, psychological, social and cultural factors are emphasized.

S110 Sociological Imagination (3 cr.)

The nature and foundations of society and the individual, the main forces that strengthen and weaken social groups and the conditions that transform social life are examined in this course.

Literature (LI)

One course from:

E170 Romance Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with popular works of romance literature and to increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. Through study of early romance tales but especially recent variations on the romance in books and film, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes (such as journey, adventure, the psychological development of the hero, and encounters with the supernatural), read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E171 Sports Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to engage students with the popular genre of sports literature. Through examining representations of athletes, the myths that surround sports, and the ways sports narratives reveal and influence our culture, students will identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E172 Readers and Writers (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with works of "self-referential" literature, i.e., literary works that reflect upon their own status as literature while also performing their other functions as a story, poem, or play.  For example, we read a novel that not only tells a story but that also reflects on the act of storytelling and how storytelling shapes meaning in our lives and in our culture.  Studying such literary works allows students not only to practice traditional conventions of reading, such as textual analysis, interpretation and critical thinking, but also encourages a deeper reflection on the act of reading itself and its role in shaping who we are.  The literature in the class thus becomes not only the source of the answers to literary questions (what does this poem mean?) but also the source of important questions about literature and culture (how does literature make meaning?  Why should one read?  What is the effect of reading?).

E173 Literature and Film (3 cr.)

This course is designed to explore various ways that literature and film might speak to one another, working from the premise that films can (and perhaps should) be read critically as texts.  Through study of literary and cinematic works linked by plot, theme, topic, and/or style, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes, read (and view) texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature and film contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E174 Dystopian Literature (3 cr.)

Dystopian works critique society, often by presenting an alternate or extreme version of society that points up the dangers of letting certain social elements (such as technology or political or legal systems) go too far.  The dystopian is intimately related to the utopian: utopian texts imagine perfect societies, or at least best possible worlds, but the benefits gained typically endanger some of our cherished values (such as freedom and love); dystopian texts reveal this dark underbelly, showing how the rise to power of some comes at the expense of others, or even society as a whole.

E175 Introduction to Literature (3 cr.)

In this course, students gain exposure to works of fiction, poetry, and drama and acquire experience in critical reading and interpretation of literature. Students not only read but also actively engage with literary texts, in the process becoming familiar with literary conventions and discourse. Readings may explore a particular theme (e.g., The Heroic, The Quest, The Individual and Community, Coming of Age); themes and reading selections vary by instructor.

E176 The Graphic Novel (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to fiction within the graphic novel genre and increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. With a close, critical focus on the relationship between text and image, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes in fiction, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E177 Holocaust Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to popular works of Holocaust fiction and increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. By evaluating Holocaust fiction closely and critically, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E178 Gothic Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with popular works of gothic literature and to increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. Through study of some seminal texts that helped establish the modern concept of Gothic, and attention especially to contemporary ghost, monster, and other eerie books and film, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E179 Fantasy Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with popular and influential works of fantasy fiction and to increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. With a particular focus on the ways in which fantasy authors build fictive worlds that challenge us to reevaluate the familiar and the magical, reinterpret ourselves and others, and reimagine the world around us, students will identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E180 Mystery and Detective Fiction (3 cr.)

This course is designed to engage students with the popular genre of mystery and detective fiction and film from its "classic" age to the present. With a particular focus on the ways in which mystery stories confront culturally driven fears and play with the notion of knowledge, students will identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E300 Dimensions of Literature (3 cr.)

This general education course is designed to give students an understanding of some major writers, themes, or trends of literature (American, English, or World) in its larger context – cultural, historical, philosophical, theological, etc. Themes or concepts that serve as points of departure in the investigation of literary history or cultural and individual expression vary from semester to semester (see specific titles on course schedule).

E333 Shakespeare (3 cr.)

This course focuses on a representative group of Shakespeare's sonnets, comedies, histories, and tragedies. Emphasis is placed on close reading of the plays, with the intention of exploring some of Shakespeare's most pressing issues, including love, nature, death, dreams, relationships between parents and children, gender roles, freedom of the will, and reality itself. The course also address the cultural milieu out of which the texts were generated; the meaning of the terms "comedy", "history", and "tragedy"; and the relationship of the written plays to modern adaptations.

E360 Literature on Location (3 cr.)

This course is designed to convey a broad sense of English literary history and culture. Through intensive study of culturally important works of English literature, written in different genres over a significant period of time, the course will explore traditionally British values, customs, social norms, and sensibilities. The course will conclude with a fortnight in England, where the class will visit landscapes and sites relevant to the course's texts.

SP401 Medieval/Renaissance Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to major authors and literary works of Spain from the medieval period through the end of the 17th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP402 18th–20th Century Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Spain from the 18th through the 20th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP403 Latin American Literature through the 18th Century (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Latin America from the colonial period through the 18th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP404 19th–20th Century Latin American Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of modern Latin America. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are studied in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP407 El Fúbol in Latin American Literature (3 cr.)

This course will explore the relationship between the international game of soccer/fútbol/football/fobal and literature in contemporary Latin American culture and society.  The works to be analyzed will range from the journalistic essay, to the short story, blogs, and, but not limited to, selections of important sociological texts related to the game.  Students will be encouraged to enhance their critical thinking skills through close readings, class discussions, and analytical writing exercises both in and outside of the classroom, as well as perform activities of vocabulary (re)production.

Moral Traditions (MT)

One course from:

PH202 Philosophy in Our World (3 cr.)

This general education course gives students the opportunity to read a major philosophical work, Plato's Republic, and to discuss issues raised by the text that relate to our world. Such issues include justice, artistic expression and censorship, ethical conduct, the role of women in society, the best form of government, family, work, freedom, and responsibility. The course is for first and second year students who want a serious introduction to philosophy and enjoy rigorous philosophical conversation.

PH305 Health Care Ethics (3 cr.)

This course provides a survey of some of the specific issues in health care ethics that are faced today by patients, providers, insurance companies and other constituencies in the health care arena. Such issues include: access — how are limited resources to be allocated? Informed consent – what information must patients possess in order to make reasonable and informed decisions about their health care? What compensatory obligations do providers have in the realm of informed consent? Funding — should the quality of health care vary by the means of the payer? Death — what is death? Also, should a patient have the right to choose the time and means of his or her death? Procedures and technologies — are all possible procedures and technical interventions morally defensible?

PH343 Contemporary Ethical Issues (3 cr.)

The course examines critically the foundations of ethical or moral judgments on vital issues such as abortion, birth control, capital punishment, civil disobedience, divorce, drug-use, ecology, euthanasia, homosexuality, marriage, pre-marital sex, suicide, segregation, stealing, truth: acquiring-revealing concealing, technology, war, and work.

PH345 Philosophy of the Person (3 cr.)

e human person (e.g., the Platonic, the Aristotelian–Thomistic, the Judeo–Christian, the Hobbesian and that of other modern thinkers). It considers such fundamental issues as the existence and nature of the human soul; whether human beings are innately good, innately evil, both or neither; in what sense, if any, human beings are rational; and the nature and basis of human freedom.

PH346 Ethical Issues in the Sciences (3 cr.)

This course provides non-science as well as science majors the opportunity to examine key issues in the sciences in the light of major ethical theories. Among the issues to be examined are: abuses and uses of nuclear energy, behavior control and psychosurgery, chemical wastes and the environment, computerized files of personal information, computerization and depersonalization, experimentation with human subjects and animals, genetic engineering and screening, reproductive techniques, organ transplants, physician-patient relationships, and euthanasia.

PH362 Business Ethics (3 cr.)

The course examines critically the major ethical or moral theories that are at the basis of decision making in the complex area of contemporary behavior we know as "the business world." It is recommended for business majors.

Natural Scientific Systems (NS)

Two courses; at least one course must have a lab:

B105 Environmental Biology with Laboratory (3 cr.)

The human position in the biological world and responsibility for living in reasonable harmony with the environs is the focus of this course. Beginning with an overview of major ecological principles governing all ecosystems, consideration is then given to such problems as population expansion, natural resources, pollution, conservation and environmental health.

B110 Botany and Zoology I (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed upon photosynthesis and respiration,and physiological processes including nutrition, gas exchange, transportation and regulation of body fluids. It is an investigation of the structure and function of both plants and animals and intended as an introductory overview.

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B200 Human Biology (2 cr.)

This course is designed for the student with little science in their backgrounds. Basic human biological principles are investigated with emphasis on nutrition, cancer, immunity, reproduction and heredity. Special consideration is given to current advances in medicine and associated bio-social issues.

B210 Introduction to Mammology with Laboratory (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the ecology and classification of mammals.  Students will be presented with information on the evolutionary history and special adaptations of mammals within the context of their ecological roles as individuals or populations in a biological community. In this course we will also discuss contemporary conservation issues related to mammals. The laboratory component of the course will allow students to practice some of the techniques used by mammologists with particular emphasis on field techniques. The development of scientific literacy skills will be heavily emphasized.

B300 Current Scientific Issues (3 cr.)

This course addresses current scientific issues of interest to the general public, ranging from modern medical advances to those affecting the environment. Stress is placed not only on the concepts involved, but also on the social, ethical, political, and economic aspects of these issues. The course is intended for non-science majors.

B350 Heredity and Society (3 cr.)

This course is open to non-biology majors only. In-depth coverage and discussion of topics that show how many of the contemporary social problems are related to the basic concepts of heredity. Some of the relevant bio-social problems considered are human reproduction, carcinogens, mutagens, genetic syndromes, chromosome abnormalities, aging, inbreeding, the genetic basis of behavior, genetic engineering, genetic screening, genetic counseling, and bioethics.

C110 World of Materials with Laboratory (3 cr.)

the chemical makeup, physical properties, historical development, and economic impact of materials encountered in daily life. Examples of the materials covered include: metals, ceramics, leather, plastics, concrete, paper, and a variety of others. The course details a "biography" of each of these materials from its primary source in the animal, vegetable, or mineral world, through the various transformations in its production and fabrication into usable products, to its ultimate fate and impact on the environment when it has lived its useful life.

C131 General Chemistry I (3 cr.)

This course covers the fundamental principles upon which the study of chemistry is based. Stoichiometry, atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, behavior of gases, kinetic molecular theory, properties of solutions, chemical reactivity and thermochemistry are included.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P113 Physics of Sound and Music (3 cr.)

This course is an exploration of the fundamental physical concepts relating to sound (vibrations and waves, overtones, Fourier synthesis and analysis) and its perception (physiology, physics, and psychophysics of hearing) and measurement (transducers and the decibel scale); sound recording and reproduction (analog and digital); musical acoustics (temperament and pitch; families of musical instruments; speech and the human vocal tract); and the acoustics of enclosures.

P121 Astronomy: The Stars and Beyond (3 cr.)

This general-education level course focuses on three broad topics in astronomy: the tools of astronomy (the celestial sphere and the motion of objects in the sky; scientific method; light, spectra, and atomic structure; the astronomical distance scale; gravity and celestial mechanics); stars and stellar evolution (the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, the main sequence, and stellar lifecycles); and galaxies and cosmology (Hubble's Law, dark matter, evidence for the Big Bang, and theories of the early universe).

P123 Investigating the Universe (3 cr.)

This general education level course covers topics similar in nature to P121 Astronomy: The Stars and Beyond but in somewhat more depth and without the observational laboratory component. It focuses on three broad areas in astronomy and cosmology: gathering information about the universe (science and its methods; models of motion of celestial objects [including distance scales and gravitation]; light, spectra, and atomic structure); the nature of stars and galaxies (stellar formation, evolution, and death; the expanding universe); and cosmology (the Big Bang theories of the early universe). Credit will not be granted for both P121 and P123.

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

P201 Introductory Physics I (3 cr.)

This course is the first half of a two-semester introductory, calculus-based, physics course for all students planning to enter one of the scientific professions. It covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, oscillations, and fluid mechanics.

P221 Global Climate Change (3 cr.)

This course first examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in the global climate change debate. We will ask ourselves what is the current data, make predictions on local areas in which we live, and propose possible solutions. The course design is problem-based. That is, students will actively participate in discovering relevant questions, data, underlying scientific principles, and solutions. As a result details of possible topics can be a little bit fluid, but possible topics include: Current climate data and controversies; Basic climate science; Data and predictions on local area; Biological, sociological and economic impact; Possible solutions. We hope to bring to the foreground the processes scientists use to draw conclusions about the physical nature of climate, building an understanding of the nature of explanation in science, and investigating how science interacts with society in general.

Please Note:

The Natural Scientific Systems general education requirement will be met only when both the lecture and laboratory courses of a lecture/laboratory pair are completed. Passing only the lecture portion of the lecture/laboratory pair does not satisfy a non-laboratory science requirement. Passing only the laboratory portion of the lecture/laboratory pair does not satisfy a laboratory science requirement.

Quantitative Systems

One course from:

BU215 Business Statistics (3 cr.)

Statistical techniques which are commonly used in all areas of business are studied. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and non-parametric statistics. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of each procedure and on communicating the results of statistical techniques to others.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M149 Calculus I with Precalculus (part 2) (4 cr.)

This course completes the two-semester sequence that begins with M148, and together with M148 provides a two-semester sequence that covers the material of M151 along with built-in coverage of precalculus topics. Topics in M149 include: trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, rules for derivatives, applications of derivatives, and definite and indefinite integrals. Credit is not granted for this course and M151.

M151 Calculus I (4 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the differential and integral calculus. Topics include: the concepts of function, limit, continuity, derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, and an introduction to transcendental functions. Credit is not granted for this course and M148 and M149.

ST132 Reasoning with Statistics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to develop student facility in the use of statistical methods and the understanding of statistical concepts. The course takes a practical approach based on statistical examples taken from everyday life. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. Appropriate technology is used to perform the calculations for many applications, and correspondingly an emphasis is placed on interpreting the results of statistical procedures. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST232.

ST232 Introduction to Statistics (2 cr.)

This course is designed to provide the basic ideas and techniques of statistics. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. This course makes significant use of appropriate technology. Topics in this course are treated at a higher mathematical level than they are treated in ST132. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST132.

Skills Requirements

Initial Requirements in Mathematics

Students must complete M100 Elementary Mathematical Ideas or M102 Intermediate Algebra with a passing grade, or score at least 70% on the intermediate algebra placement test, or score a minimum of 21 on the math section of the ACT or 500 on the math section of the SAT; to be completed in first year

Writing Requirement

A sequence of three writing courses is required: a first year writing course (E120 or E220, depending on placement); a lower-division writing-intensive course (usually LCT225, LH155, or LH205); and an upper-division writing-intesive course, usually in the major.

Students whose initial writing placement is E105 Writing Skills must successfully complete E105 prior to beginning E120 English Composition.

E120 or E220 should be competed in the first-year.

Students who bring in AP, CLEP or transfer credits for a course equivalent to E120 prior to their matriculation at Saint Mary’s University may use that course for their first year writing course, even if they are placed into E220.

The following lower-division courses

The following lower-division courses are coded as writing-intensive and fulfill the second part of the writing requirement:

E220 Argumentative and Research Writing is taken if E120 is taken as the first-year writing course.

COM201 Reporting I (3 cr.)

Principles and practice in journalistic writing and related skills and theory, including style and conventions of journalistic writing, news judgment criteria, techniques for interviewing, ethical dimensions. Extensive writing in and out of class.

E120 English Composition (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes the process of writing, from the generation of ideas to the editing of the final text. Students practice strategies to improve the organization, development, and style of their essay writing. The course also stresses helping students achieve competence in grammar, punctuation, usage, and mechanics and includes a review of MLA citation and documentation format in concert with writing a shorter research paper.

E220 Argumentative and Research Writing (3 cr.)

In this intermediate writing course, students learn how to read and produce informative and persuasive essays. Students write essays and a research paper incorporating outside source material. Review of MLA citation and documentation style is included, along with practice in doing library and web-based research.

H270 Historical Thinking (3 cr.)

This is a sophomore level course for students intending to major in history or history/social science, or those interested in exploring these majors. It is also recommended but not required for history minors. The course introduces students to the discipline of history, and in particular to the skills of thinking historically, of collecting and analyzing historical evidence, of critically reading the work of historians. The course also focuses on close readings of one or more major historical works which make large claims about the human experience by integrating approaches from several disciplines, and also on critical evaluation of the debates generated by these works. The course encourages students to broadly synthesize their learning and to deeply reflect on the nature of the historical discipline.

LCT225 Perspectives on the Good Human Life (3 cr.)

This course, taken in the sophomore year, moves beyond the first-year seminar focus of self-identity to explore various historical and contemporary perspectives on living life well. In the spirit of De La Salle's commitment to serving others and his recognition of the value of those less fortunate, this course challenges students to examine how their own pursuit of the good life fits into a larger social and historical picture. As a writing-intensive course, Perspectives allows students the opportunity to develop their writing skills from the initial stages of critical reading to drafting and revision.

LH155 The Classical Tradition (4 cr.)

This course introduces students to central texts of the classical tradition in order to provide them with a critical understanding of ancient works that have been central in the development of both a global and a particularly Western tradition. It continues to engage students in the key honors program practices of active and close reading, shared inquiry and formal presentations. The course provides as part of its inquiry questions about the historical and/or cultural conditions that help one to understand the origin or implications of issues raised by the texts.

LH205 Ethics and Justice in Society (4 cr.)

This course continues the practice of close reading of central texts, now with a particular eye for how such texts address fundamental philosophical questions of ethics, justice, and politics, especially as they relate to the concept of the "happy life." Through close reading of classical authors such as Plato, Aristotle and Dante, students will also be asked to consider the themes of the course in contemporary contexts, in particular by demonstrating the call to ethical service through their service learning work at area agencies.

PS242 Logic of Analysis (4 cr.)

This course examines the major social science perspectives in conjunction with an instruction in the logic and procedures of gathering information about social phenomena. The course covers such topics as: the logic of the scientific method, research design, hypotheses formation, theory and methods of scaling, and research analysis.

S250 Logic of Analysis (4 cr.)

This course examines the major sociological perspectives in conjunction with an instruction in the logic and procedures of gathering information about social phenomena. The course covers topics such as: the logic of the scientific method, research design, hypotheses formation, theory and methods of scaling, and research analysis.

The following upper-division courses are

The following upper-division courses are coded as writing-intensive and fulfill the third and final part of the writing requirement. A course from this list can fulfill the second part of the requirement (lower-division writing-intensive course) if it is not needed for the upper-division requirement:

AC428 Advanced Accounting (3 cr.)

The course includes a study of business combinations, a survey of international accounting, and partnership accounting.

AR461 Art Seminar I (2 cr.)

These seminars involve the production of independent works in the art major's primary area of concentration. The seminars also focus on professional practices, ethics, and contemporary trends in the arts. The hanging of a graduation exhibit in the senior year is required of all art and design majors. AR461 offered fall semester, AR462 offered spring semester. Art Seminar I fulfills the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

B412 Molecular Biology with Laboratory (3 cr.)

An analysis of the regulation of cellular metabolism at the molecular level is the core of this study. The major themes include the biochemistry of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

B493 Biology Research and Thesis (2 cr.)

The course consists of an independent investigation of a field or laboratory problem of the student's choice in a specific area of biology. A written report of the research project in the form of a thesis is required; an oral presentation may be required, at the discretion of the research advisor. This course is a graduation requirement for biology majors.

C447 Chemistry Research: Thesis (1 cr.)

This is the third course of the three required research courses for chemistry and biochemistry majors. The independent computational and/or laboratory work is completed, if necessary. The thesis is written, with time for a writing revision cycle. A formal presentation of the research results is given at an undergraduate research symposium or its equivalent.

COM301 Reporting II (3 cr.)

Hands-on experience in identifying, pursuing, and writing news stories; principles and practice in writing various news-story types.

COM331 Reporting Governmental Affairs (3 cr.)

An examination of units of local and state government and their coverage in the news media; projects designed to familiarize students with the workings of governmental and quasi-governmental agencies.

CS301 Computers and Society (3 cr.)

This course covers a wide array of current topics related to social, legal, and ethical issues arising from the pervasive use of current and emerging computer-related technologies. Through discussion and writing, students are expected to thoughtfully explore the covered topics. This course is part of the College's Intensive Writing Program and satisfies the upper-level writing requirements for computer science majors.

E325 The Art of the Essay (3 cr.)

In this course, students produce a variety of essays that cover a range of rhetorical situations. Emphasis is placed on strategies for developing and organizing essays as well as on rhetorical concerns, such as audience, purpose, voice, and style. Attention is also paid to integrating research, both formal and informal, into students' work.

E490 Senior Thesis (2 cr.)

Designed to be a capstone experience for senior English majors, this course provides advanced instruction in the research methods, drafting and revision, and bibliography work involved in writing a major research project. Students complete a major research paper in an area of their interest in literary studies and make an oral defense of their project at the end of the course.

EC440 International Trade, Finance and Monetary Issues (3 cr.)

An intermediate course examining the forces which determine the competitive conditions and trade patterns in the global economy. Representative topics are monetary issues, balance of payments, capital movements and capital markets.

ED301 School and Society (5 cr.)

The initial focus of this course emphasizes historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education. Students examine connections between theory and practice on topics within these educational areas. Topics include today's students, teachers, school, teacher effectiveness, current issues, school reform, and professionalism. A second focus of the course is an extensive field experience where students observe and participate in elementary, middle, and secondary classrooms. Throughout the course an emphasis is placed on developing skills in human resources and the use of reflective practice in teaching.

F306 Advanced French Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the French language.

H370 Research and Writing (3 cr.)

This is a junior-level course required for those intending to major in history or history/social science. It is also recommended but not required for those intending to minor in history, and for those who are social science education majors. It serves as an introduction to the critical thinking skills and dispositions used by historians as well as some of the basic research techniques employed by historians in research papers. The course requires students engage in their own research and writing, but focus on a broad topic of the instructor's choosing that will enable the instructor to introduce students to various source bases, research methods, argument strategies, and theories/ epistemologies that may inform their senior theses. Students are encouraged to start developing their senior thesis projects, especially as a way of transferring the knowledge gained from studying the course's topic to a topic of their own choosing so it can dovetail with the senior thesis course.

H470 Senior Thesis I (2 cr.)

This course guides history and history/social science majors through the research and writing of their senior theses. It builds on H270 and H370 as it guides students through the finalization of their research topic, the formulation of an argumentative thesis, the identification of relevant primary sources and secondary literature, the proper application of relevant research methods, the proper usage of Chicago Manual of Style annotation and bibliography, and the writing and organization of a thirty-page research paper.

H471 Senior Thesis II (1 cr.)

Students who take this course work closely and individually with their senior thesis project director while simultaneously taking H470 with their fellow history and history/social science majors. Together with the project director, students will finalize their research topic, formulate an argumentative thesis, identify relevant primary sources and secondary literature, apply relevant research methods, properly use Chicago Manual of Style annotation and bibliography, and write a thirty-page research paper.

LH405 Catholicism and the Modern World (4 cr.)

In this course, the "modern world" is recognized as the creation of revolutions of the mind that have their roots in 17th century Western philosophy but that took hold in many disparate fields in the 19th and 20th centuries as a modern worldview. One alternative worldview that has both embraced and challenged aspects of modernity is Catholicism. This course explores the works and impacts of major thinkers of that world-transforming intellectual movement called modernity in dialogue with Catholic responses to those thinkers. Through reading, writing and seminar discussion, the course challenges students to uncover what modernity means, what Catholicism means, and what synergies and antagonisms might exist between the two. Such discoveries provide a critical understanding of contemporary culture and provoke consideration of how one can live more thoughtful and responsible lives as scholars and servants in a postmodern world.

M491 Senior Seminar (2 cr.)

This course consists of student presentations from mathematics, mathematical modeling, mathematics education, or statistics. Each student chooses a topic in consultation with the instructor, do appropriate background reading, and prepare an oral presentation and written paper on the topic. A senior assessment test is administered as part of this course.

MG315 Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)

This course examines management practices unique to the small business environment and also provides a first look and overview of entrepreneurship. Course work examines the importance of entrepreneurship to market economies; other topics include developing ideas for new business ventures, formation and financing of new business ventures, and managing growth through the early years of operation. In addition, students write a detailed business plan based upon an idea of their choosing.

MG336 Human Resource Management (3 cr.)

The course centers upon utilizing and managing human resources by effective integration of personal goals and organizational goals. Topics include motivation, job attitudes, job performance, appraisal, recruitment, selection, training, and compensation (salary and fringe benefits).

MK371 Professional Selling and Sales Management (3 cr.)

The selling component of this course involves learning selling concepts and the communications skills needed to apply them. Topics include prospecting, approaching the customer, determining customer wants and needs, making the sales presentation, overcoming objections, and closing the sale. The management component of the course involves recruiting and hiring, training, determining sales territories, sales forecasting, compensation schemes motivation, and management of sales force.

MU341 Music History I (3 cr.)

This course is a writing intensive study of music history covering ancient, medieval, renaissance, and baroque western art music. A basic understanding of the history of western civilization is expected.

MU392 Music Business (3 cr.)

A series of guest presenters representing diverse fields within the music business offers insight as to their work in the music industry. This course provides an overview of some basic aspects of the music business including: copyright and publishing, music merchandising, some aspects of licensing, career management and promotion, networking and influences of technology.

P390/391 Advanced Laboratory I, II (1 each cr.)

This course is generally taken during the senior year, although it may be taken earlier. Students either submit a project to be explored or constructed, perform a series of measurements and subsequent data analysis on an already-existing apparatus, or undertake a computational or theoretical project under the guidance of the laboratory instructor. The project must include a significant writing component.

P410 Physics Directed Research (2 cr.)

This course is intended for all physics majors; it is recommended for majors in physics science education. It may be taken in addition to or in place of P390/391 Advanced Laboratory. Its purpose is to provide students an opportunity to explore a topic in physics in depth over a period of at least one semester under the guidance of a member of the physics faculty, and thereby demonstrate understanding of a particular concept or focused set of concepts at the advanced undergraduate level. It is also intended to give students project-based experience in experimental design, recordkeeping, and scientific writing.

PH402 Senior Thesis (3 cr.)

This course is taken in the second semester of the senior year and is an opportunity to work closely with a faculty member in the philosophy department on a written thesis.

PS342 Field Methods (4 cr.)

This course offers a working experience in the purpose and tools of qualitative field methods. The course covers rapport, methods of observation, field notes, data coding and analysis, ethnography, focus groups and interviews, as well as an introduction to quasi-experimentation.

PY370 Personality Psychology (4 cr.)

Personality psychology examines the question, "What does it mean to be a person?" This course includes historical ways in which we have tried to understand human persons. Classical personality theories including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, trait and humanistic/existential are studied and evaluated. Contemporary research in personality areas such as attachment, temperament, the big five traits, and psychological well-being is studied and integrated with historical and classical approaches.

PY490 Research: Data Collection (1 cr.)

In this course, students conduct collect data for their experiment or study, enter the data, and start to analyze the data. Independent research is emphasized in consultation with the instructor and an advisor.

PY498 Internship Integration (1 cr.)

Students research and write an integrative in-depth paper based upon the student's internship experience. The course is taken subsequent to or concurrent with the internship. An extensive literature review is conducted, including theoretical and empirical studies. Students make a formal public presentation based on their paper and internship. Graded pass/no credit.

S350 Field Methods (4 cr.)

This course offers a working experience in the purpose and tools of qualitative field methods. The course covers rapport, methods of observation, field notes, data coding and analysis, ethnography, focus groups and interviews, as well as an introduction to quasi-experimentation.

SP302 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

TH400 Christology (3 cr.)

This writing intensive course studies the development and interpretation of Christian theological doctrine on the person of Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ. The course treats issues from the various interpretations of the Gospel tradition to the development of doctrine (particularly in the councils of Nicaea and Chalcedon) to modern interpretations of the role of Christ in systematic theology.

Oral Communication Requirement

Complete two courses coded for oral communication, either
COM101 and LCT140
or LH105 and LH455

COM101 Public Speaking (3 cr.)

This course prepares students to make effective, informative and persuasive presentations incorporating audio-visual enhancements, and to utilize active listening techniques. The responsibilities of both the speaker and the listener are stressed. Practical experience in preparation, delivery/participation, and evaluation are provided.

LCT140 First-Year Seminar (3 cr.)

First-Year Seminar provides new students at Saint Mary's University with an integrated, initial academic experience that enables them to successfully begin the process of developing a Lasallian identity as educated and compassionate adults committed to ethical participation in our global society. To facilitate a practical transition from high school to college, emphasis is placed on developing the academic skills and attitudes necessary for students to think critically about those questions that help shape their identity as young adults: who am I?, what can I become?, and how can I become that person?

LH105 Origins of Human Thought and Culture (4 cr.)

As the first course in the Lasallian Honors Program at Saint Mary's University, Origins considers a variety of beginnings. This first-year seminar facilitates a successful transition to the university through its emphasis on developing critical academic skills and attitudes as well as appreciation of the university's Lasallian mission and of Winona's natural environment. Points of departure for understanding our intellectual, environmental and spiritual traditions include readings on the natural features of our region and on the life of Saint John Baptist de La Salle; the ancient narratives of Gilgamesh, Genesis and The Iliad; and a modern novel, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, which elaborates on the modern significance of ancient hero stories. As part of the introduction to the Saint Mary's community, and as a precursor to the Aesthetics course in the junior year of the honors program, students attend and discuss four local arts events during the semester. Students' participation as audience members provides opportunities to reflect on the nature and value of art in community and culture.

LH455 Lasallian Honors Capstone (4 cr.)

This senior-year colloquium provides a capstone experience for seniors in the honors program by having them explore, in a U.S. American context, four spheres of adult life: citizenship, work, relationships and spirituality. Students are challenged to engage these themes through close reading and discussion of texts, reflection on their education in the Lasallian Honors Program, and service learning. The course emphasizes an awareness of historical development of society and social construction of individuals and systems, the challenging and ownership of one's own beliefs, and the living out of Lasallian values in a contemporary world.

Critical-Thinking Requirement

The Critical-Thinking Requirement is satisfied within the major.

Problem-Solving Requirement

The Problem-Solving Requirement is satisfied with the Quantitative Systems course.