Lasallian Honors Program

Lasallian Honors Program

The Lasallian Honors Program partially fulfills the general education requirements for graduation and is available to a select number of students each year.

It is designed to provide an intellectually stimulating experience for bright and motivated students who wish to engage in "shared inquiry" in small, interdisciplinary classes (also available is the Lasallian Core Traditions Program).

The hallmarks of the Honors Program are in-depth discussions of the Great Books and other notable texts of the Western and Eastern cultural traditions; service learning with organizations in the community; experiential learning in the fine arts; and participation in a community of learners who desire to grow intellectually, spiritually, and creatively. The program is grounded in the university mission and the Lasallian dispositions of faith, zeal, service, and community.

The ultimate goal of the Lasallian Honors Program is to awaken and nurture the intellectual, spiritual, and personal development of learners in preparation for lives of servant leadership and appreciation of the world’s intellectual and cultural heritages.

Program Details

Students are invited into the Lasallian Honors Program based on their college-entrance test scores, their academic record, and their co-curricular activities and achievements.

Through a series of eight seminar courses, students read and engage with the most important ideas in human history. Through service learning, students explore the practical dimensions of social justice in the local community and reflect on the Christian concept of servant leadership. And through innovative tutorials in the fine arts, students learn about and create a variety of works of art.

Students are required to maintain a minimum 3.2 cumulative grade point average in order to remain in good standing in the Lasallian Honors Program. Students who spend a semester studying abroad can substitute one course taken abroad for one honors course.

Program Outcomes

Students in the Lasallian Honors Program develop advanced skills in analytical reading, writing, critical thinking, and oral communications. The curriculum promotes active learning, preparation for graduate study and professional work, and camaraderie in a supportive community of peers and professors.

 

Degree Requirements

Lsallian Honors courses

All of the following:

LH105 Origins and Foundations (4 cr.)

As the first course in the Lasallian Honors Program at Saint Mary's University, Origins considers a variety of beginnings. This first-year seminar facilitates a successful transition to the university through its emphasis on developing critical academic skills and attitudes as well as appreciation of the university's Lasallian mission and of Winona's natural environment. Points of departure for understanding our intellectual, environmental and spiritual traditions include readings on the natural features of our region and on the life of Saint John Baptist de La Salle; the ancient narratives of Gilgamesh, Genesis and The Iliad; and a modern novel, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, which elaborates on the modern significance of ancient hero stories. As part of the introduction to the Saint Mary's community, and as a precursor to the Aesthetics course in the junior year of the honors program, students attend and discuss four local arts events during the semester. Students' participation as audience members provides opportunities to reflect on the nature and value of art in community and culture.

LH155 The Classical Tradition (4 cr.)

This course introduces students to central texts of the classical tradition in order to provide them with a critical understanding of ancient works that have been central in the development of both a global and a particularly Western tradition. It continues to engage students in the key honors program practices of active and close reading, shared inquiry and formal presentations. The course provides as part of its inquiry questions about the historical and/or cultural conditions that help one to understand the origin or implications of issues raised by the texts.

LH205 Ethics and Justice in Society (4 cr.)

This course continues the practice of close reading of central texts, now with a particular eye for how such texts address fundamental philosophical questions of ethics, justice, and politics, especially as they relate to the concept of the "happy life." Through close reading of classical authors such as Plato, Aristotle and Dante, students will also be asked to consider the themes of the course in contemporary contexts, in particular by demonstrating the call to ethical service through their service learning work at area agencies.

LH255 Knowledge, Authority, and the Individual in Culture and the Cosmos (4 cr.)

e beyond the largely unchallenged authority of scholasticism, a split between philosophy and what would come to be called science, a reinterpretation of the role of the individual as a knowing subject, and an expanded emphasis on experience and experiment. The course ends with a close reading and discussion of Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov as one critique of the implications of the emerging tradition of Western Humanism. Students continue to engage in service learning begun in LH205 as they explore the interaction between concrete realities and abstract ideas evident in much of the work of these authors.

LH305 Aesthetics (4 cr.)

This course provides an intensive study of questions and issues that are both generated and answered by a variety of art forms, including literature, painting, sculpture and music. In studying the nature and role of the imagination, and the process of embodying that imagination in art, the course continues the inquiry into epistemological questions about how one comes to know the world that were raised in earlier honors classes about the classical world and scientific reasoning. Students will consider a number of significant literary works; paintings and sculptures from different cultural contexts; and significant works of music to address such questions as the nature of art, its role in interpreting the world, and how it represents or creates what we understand of our world or culture. As part of this inquiry, students will be asked to produce and reflect on their own works of the imagination.

LH355 Classics of the East and Islam (4 cr.)

This third-year seminar builds upon the honors program's emphasis on ways of knowing through close reading and discussion of classic and contemporary texts honored by Eastern traditions, including the Bhagavad Gita, the Tao Te Ching, the Qu'ran, and prominent contemporary Buddhist thinkers. Students will be introduced to art and to vocal and other practices (singing, chant, meditation) central to the spiritual experience in these traditions.

LH405 Catholicism and the Modern World (4 cr.)

In this course, the "modern world" is recognized as the creation of revolutions of the mind that have their roots in 17th century Western philosophy but that took hold in many disparate fields in the 19th and 20th centuries as a modern worldview. One alternative worldview that has both embraced and challenged aspects of modernity is Catholicism. This course explores the works and impacts of major thinkers of that world-transforming intellectual movement called modernity in dialogue with Catholic responses to those thinkers. Through reading, writing and seminar discussion, the course challenges students to uncover what modernity means, what Catholicism means, and what synergies and antagonisms might exist between the two. Such discoveries provide a critical understanding of contemporary culture and provoke consideration of how one can live more thoughtful and responsible lives as scholars and servants in a postmodern world.

LH455 Lasallian Honors Capstone (4 cr.)

In this capstone experience for seniors in the honors program seminar explore, in a U.S. American context, four spheres of adult life: citizenship, work, relationships and spirituality. Students are challenged to engage these themes through close reading and discussion of texts, reflection on their education in the Lasallian Honors Program, and service learning. The course emphasizes an awareness of historical development of society and social construction of individuals and systems, the challenging and ownership of one's own beliefs, and the living out of Lasallian values in a contemporary world.

Faith Traditions One (FT1)

One course from:

TH112 History of the Bible (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible inspires faith for billions of persons worldwide and is a best-seller every year. In this course the Bible is studied as a product of God and of people. Students consider how the Bible actually emerged in the lives of Jews and Christians as well as how it sustains Christianity today. Typical areas of study are the Bible's literary forms, historical contexts, and faithful heroes.

TH113 Bible and Belief (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible inspires faith for billions of persons worldwide and is a best-seller every year. In this course the Bible is studied as a means of God's revelation. Special focus is given to how different denominations vary in their respective use of the book as a source of divine revelation. Also considered is how broad assumptions about the nature of the text shape various theologies and how issues like inspiration, myth and ethics are determined both from and for the reading of the Bible.

TH114 Religions of the Book (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible inspires faith for billions of persons worldwide. In this course the Bible is studied as an example of the world's Scriptures. Comparisons and contrasts are drawn between both the content and the use of Scripture in Jewish, Christian and Muslim denominations. Attention can be given to some of the uses of Scripture in eastern world views, for example, Hinduism and Buddhism.

TH115 The Mystery of Salvation (3 cr.)

The Christian Bible leads to Christ, the mystery of salvation. This course is divided into four parts corresponding to the Catechism of the Catholic Church: professing our faith, celebrating our faith, living our faith, and praying our faith. The primary sources are Sacred Scripture and the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Natural Scientific Systems (NS)

Students completing the Lasallian Honors Program must complete one of the following courses and lab.

B105 Environmental Biology with Laboratory (3 cr.)

The human position in the biological world and responsibility for living in reasonable harmony with the environs is the focus of this course. Beginning with an overview of major ecological principles governing all ecosystems, consideration is then given to such problems as population expansion, natural resources, pollution, conservation and environmental health.

B110 Botany and Zoology I (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed upon photosynthesis and respiration,and physiological processes including nutrition, gas exchange, transportation and regulation of body fluids. It is an investigation of the structure and function of both plants and animals and intended as an introductory overview.

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B200 Human Biology (2 cr.)

This course is designed for the student with little science in their backgrounds. Basic human biological principles are investigated with emphasis on nutrition, cancer, immunity, reproduction and heredity. Special consideration is given to current advances in medicine and associated bio-social issues.

B300 Current Scientific Issues (3 cr.)

This course addresses current scientific issues of interest to the general public, ranging from modern medical advances to those affecting the environment. Stress is placed not only on the concepts involved, but also on the social, ethical, political, and economic aspects of these issues. The course is intended for non-science majors.

B350 Heredity and Society (3 cr.)

This course is open to non-biology majors only. In-depth coverage and discussion of topics that show how many of the contemporary social problems are related to the basic concepts of heredity. Some of the relevant bio-social problems considered are human reproduction, carcinogens, mutagens, genetic syndromes, chromosome abnormalities, aging, inbreeding, the genetic basis of behavior, genetic engineering, genetic screening, genetic counseling, and bioethics.

C110 World of Materials with Laboratory (3 cr.)

the chemical makeup, physical properties, historical development, and economic impact of materials encountered in daily life. Examples of the materials covered include: metals, ceramics, leather, plastics, concrete, paper, and a variety of others. The course details a "biography" of each of these materials from its primary source in the animal, vegetable, or mineral world, through the various transformations in its production and fabrication into usable products, to its ultimate fate and impact on the environment when it has lived its useful life.

C131 General Chemistry I (3 cr.)

This course covers the fundamental principles upon which the study of chemistry is based. Stoichiometry, atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, behavior of gases, kinetic molecular theory, properties of solutions, chemical reactivity and thermochemistry are included.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P113 Physics of Sound and Music (3 cr.)

This course is an exploration of the fundamental physical concepts relating to sound (vibrations and waves, overtones, Fourier synthesis and analysis) and its perception (physiology, physics, and psychophysics of hearing) and measurement (transducers and the decibel scale); sound recording and reproduction (analog and digital); musical acoustics (temperament and pitch; families of musical instruments; speech and the human vocal tract); and the acoustics of enclosures.

P121 Astronomy: The Stars and Beyond (3 cr.)

This general-education level course focuses on three broad topics in astronomy: the tools of astronomy (the celestial sphere and the motion of objects in the sky; scientific method; light, spectra, and atomic structure; the astronomical distance scale; gravity and celestial mechanics); stars and stellar evolution (the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, the main sequence, and stellar lifecycles); and galaxies and cosmology (Hubble's Law, dark matter, evidence for the Big Bang, and theories of the early universe).

P123 Investigating the Universe (3 cr.)

This general education level course covers topics similar in nature to P121 Astronomy: The Stars and Beyond but in somewhat more depth and without the observational laboratory component. It focuses on three broad areas in astronomy and cosmology: gathering information about the universe (science and its methods; models of motion of celestial objects [including distance scales and gravitation]; light, spectra, and atomic structure); the nature of stars and galaxies (stellar formation, evolution, and death; the expanding universe); and cosmology (the Big Bang theories of the early universe). Credit will not be granted for both P121 and P123.

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

P201 Introductory Physics I (3 cr.)

This course is the first half of a two-semester introductory, calculus-based, physics course for all students planning to enter one of the scientific professions. It covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, oscillations, and fluid mechanics.

Please Note:

The Natural Scientific Systems general education requirement will be met only when both the lecture and laboratory courses of a lecture/laboratory pair are completed.  Passing only the lecture portion of the lecture/laboratory pair does not satisfy a non-laboratory science requirement.  Passing only the laboratory portion of the lecture/laboratory pair does not satisfy a laboratory science requirement.

Quantitative Systems

One course from:

BU215 Business Statistics (3 cr.)

Statistical techniques which are commonly used in all areas of business are studied. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and non-parametric statistics. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of each procedure and on communicating the results of statistical techniques to others.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M149 Calculus I with Precalculus (part 2) (4 cr.)

This course completes the two-semester sequence that begins with M148, and together with M148 provides a two-semester sequence that covers the material of M151 along with built-in coverage of precalculus topics. Topics in M149 include: trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, rules for derivatives, applications of derivatives, and definite and indefinite integrals. Credit is not granted for this course and M151.

M151 Calculus I (4 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the differential and integral calculus. Topics include: the concepts of function, limit, continuity, derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, and an introduction to transcendental functions. Credit is not granted for this course and M148 and M149.

ST132 Reasoning with Statistics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to develop student facility in the use of statistical methods and the understanding of statistical concepts. The course takes a practical approach based on statistical examples taken from everyday life. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. Appropriate technology is used to perform the calculations for many applications, and correspondingly an emphasis is placed on interpreting the results of statistical procedures. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST232.

ST232 Introduction to Statistics (2 cr.)

This course is designed to provide the basic ideas and techniques of statistics. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. This course makes significant use of appropriate technology. Topics in this course are treated at a higher mathematical level than they are treated in ST132. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST132.

Skills Requirements

Initial Requirements in Mathematics

Students must complete M100 Elementary Mathematical Ideas or M102 Intermediate Algebra with a passing grade, or score at least 70% on the intermediate algebra placement test, or score a minimum of 21 on the math section of the ACT or 500 on the math section of the SAT; to be completed in first year

Writing Requirement

A sequence of three writing courses is required: a first year writing course (E120 or E220, depending on placement); a lower-division writing-intensive course (usually LCT225, LH155, or LH205); and an upper-division writing-intesive course, usually in the major.

Students whose initial writing placement is E105 Writing Skills must successfully complete E105 prior to beginning E120 English Composition.

E120 or E220 should be competed in the first-year.

Students who bring in AP, CLEP or transfer credits for a course equivalent to E120 prior to their matriculation at Saint Mary’s University may use that course for their first year writing course, even if they are placed into E220.

The following lower-division courses

The following lower-division courses are coded as writing-intensive and fulfill the second part of the writing requirement:

E220 Argumentative and Research Writing is taken if E120 is taken as the first-year writing course.

COM201 Reporting I (3 cr.)

Principles and practice in journalistic writing and related skills and theory, including style and conventions of journalistic writing, news judgment criteria, techniques for interviewing, ethical dimensions. Extensive writing in and out of class.

E120 English Composition (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes the process of writing, from the generation of ideas to the editing of the final text. Students practice strategies to improve the organization, development, and style of their essay writing. The course also stresses helping students achieve competence in grammar, punctuation, usage, and mechanics and includes a review of MLA citation and documentation format in concert with writing a shorter research paper.

E220 Argumentative and Research Writing (3 cr.)

In this intermediate writing course, students learn how to read and produce informative and persuasive essays. Students write essays and a research paper incorporating outside source material. Review of MLA citation and documentation style is included, along with practice in doing library and web-based research.

H270 Historical Thinking (3 cr.)

This is a sophomore level course for students intending to major in history or history/social science, or those interested in exploring these majors. It is also recommended but not required for history minors. The course introduces students to the discipline of history, and in particular to the skills of thinking historically, of collecting and analyzing historical evidence, of critically reading the work of historians. The course also focuses on close readings of one or more major historical works which make large claims about the human experience by integrating approaches from several disciplines, and also on critical evaluation of the debates generated by these works. The course encourages students to broadly synthesize their learning and to deeply reflect on the nature of the historical discipline.

LCT225 Perspectives on the Good Human Life (3 cr.)

This course, taken in the sophomore year, moves beyond the first-year seminar focus of self-identity to explore various historical and contemporary perspectives on living life well. In the spirit of De La Salle's commitment to serving others and his recognition of the value of those less fortunate, this course challenges students to examine how their own pursuit of the good life fits into a larger social and historical picture. As a writing-intensive course, Perspectives allows students the opportunity to develop their writing skills from the initial stages of critical reading to drafting and revision.

LH155 The Classical Tradition (4 cr.)

This course introduces students to central texts of the classical tradition in order to provide them with a critical understanding of ancient works that have been central in the development of both a global and a particularly Western tradition. It continues to engage students in the key honors program practices of active and close reading, shared inquiry and formal presentations. The course provides as part of its inquiry questions about the historical and/or cultural conditions that help one to understand the origin or implications of issues raised by the texts.

LH205 Ethics and Justice in Society (4 cr.)

This course continues the practice of close reading of central texts, now with a particular eye for how such texts address fundamental philosophical questions of ethics, justice, and politics, especially as they relate to the concept of the "happy life." Through close reading of classical authors such as Plato, Aristotle and Dante, students will also be asked to consider the themes of the course in contemporary contexts, in particular by demonstrating the call to ethical service through their service learning work at area agencies.

PS242 Logic of Analysis (4 cr.)

This course examines the major social science perspectives in conjunction with an instruction in the logic and procedures of gathering information about social phenomena. The course covers such topics as: the logic of the scientific method, research design, hypotheses formation, theory and methods of scaling, and research analysis.

S250 Logic of Analysis (4 cr.)

This course examines the major sociological perspectives in conjunction with an instruction in the logic and procedures of gathering information about social phenomena. The course covers topics such as: the logic of the scientific method, research design, hypotheses formation, theory and methods of scaling, and research analysis.

The following upper-division courses are

The following upper-division courses are coded as writing-intensive and fulfill the third and final part of the writing requirement. A course from this list can fulfill the second part of the requirement (lower-division writing-intensive course) if it is not needed for the upper-division requirement:

AC428 Advanced Accounting (3 cr.)

The course includes a study of business combinations, a survey of international accounting, and partnership accounting.

AR461 Art Seminar I (2 cr.)

These seminars involve the production of independent works in the art major's primary area of concentration. The seminars also focus on professional practices, ethics, and contemporary trends in the arts. The hanging of a graduation exhibit in the senior year is required of all art and design majors. AR461 offered fall semester, AR462 offered spring semester. Art Seminar I fulfills the Upper Division Writing Requirement.

B412 Molecular Biology with Laboratory (3 cr.)

An analysis of the regulation of cellular metabolism at the molecular level is the core of this study. The major themes include the biochemistry of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

B493 Biology Research and Thesis (2 cr.)

The course consists of an independent investigation of a field or laboratory problem of the student's choice in a specific area of biology. A written report of the research project in the form of a thesis is required; an oral presentation may be required, at the discretion of the research advisor. This course is a graduation requirement for biology majors.

C447 Chemistry Research: Thesis (1 cr.)

This is the third course of the three required research courses for chemistry and biochemistry majors. The independent computational and/or laboratory work is completed, if necessary. The thesis is written, with time for a writing revision cycle. A formal presentation of the research results is given at an undergraduate research symposium or its equivalent.

COM301 Reporting II (3 cr.)

Hands-on experience in identifying, pursuing, and writing news stories; principles and practice in writing various news-story types.

COM331 Reporting Governmental Affairs (3 cr.)

An examination of units of local and state government and their coverage in the news media; projects designed to familiarize students with the workings of governmental and quasi-governmental agencies.

CS301 Computers and Society (3 cr.)

This course covers a wide array of current topics related to social, legal, and ethical issues arising from the pervasive use of current and emerging computer-related technologies. Through discussion and writing, students are expected to thoughtfully explore the covered topics. This course is part of the College's Intensive Writing Program and satisfies the upper-level writing requirements for computer science majors.

E325 The Art of the Essay (3 cr.)

In this course, students produce a variety of essays that cover a range of rhetorical situations. Emphasis is placed on strategies for developing and organizing essays as well as on rhetorical concerns, such as audience, purpose, voice, and style. Attention is also paid to integrating research, both formal and informal, into students' work.

E490 Senior Thesis (2 cr.)

Designed to be a capstone experience for senior English majors, this course provides advanced instruction in the research methods, drafting and revision, and bibliography work involved in writing a major research project. Students complete a major research paper in an area of their interest in literary studies and make an oral defense of their project at the end of the course.

EC440 International Trade, Finance and Monetary Issues (3 cr.)

An intermediate course examining the forces which determine the competitive conditions and trade patterns in the global economy. Representative topics are monetary issues, balance of payments, capital movements and capital markets.

ED301 School and Society (5 cr.)

The initial focus of this course emphasizes historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education. Students examine connections between theory and practice on topics within these educational areas. Topics include today's students, teachers, school, teacher effectiveness, current issues, school reform, and professionalism. A second focus of the course is an extensive field experience where students observe and participate in elementary, middle, and secondary classrooms. Throughout the course an emphasis is placed on developing skills in human resources and the use of reflective practice in teaching.

F306 Advanced French Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the French language.

H370 Research and Writing (3 cr.)

This is a junior-level course required for those intending to major in history or history/social science. It is also recommended but not required for those intending to minor in history, and for those who are social science education majors. It serves as an introduction to the critical thinking skills and dispositions used by historians as well as some of the basic research techniques employed by historians in research papers. The course requires students engage in their own research and writing, but focus on a broad topic of the instructor's choosing that will enable the instructor to introduce students to various source bases, research methods, argument strategies, and theories/ epistemologies that may inform their senior theses. Students are encouraged to start developing their senior thesis projects, especially as a way of transferring the knowledge gained from studying the course's topic to a topic of their own choosing so it can dovetail with the senior thesis course.

H470 Senior Thesis I (2 cr.)

This course guides history and history/social science majors through the research and writing of their senior theses. It builds on H270 and H370 as it guides students through the finalization of their research topic, the formulation of an argumentative thesis, the identification of relevant primary sources and secondary literature, the proper application of relevant research methods, the proper usage of Chicago Manual of Style annotation and bibliography, and the writing and organization of a thirty-page research paper.

H471 Senior Thesis II (1 cr.)

Students who take this course work closely and individually with their senior thesis project director while simultaneously taking H470 with their fellow history and history/social science majors. Together with the project director, students will finalize their research topic, formulate an argumentative thesis, identify relevant primary sources and secondary literature, apply relevant research methods, properly use Chicago Manual of Style annotation and bibliography, and write a thirty-page research paper.

LH405 Catholicism and the Modern World (4 cr.)

In this course, the "modern world" is recognized as the creation of revolutions of the mind that have their roots in 17th century Western philosophy but that took hold in many disparate fields in the 19th and 20th centuries as a modern worldview. One alternative worldview that has both embraced and challenged aspects of modernity is Catholicism. This course explores the works and impacts of major thinkers of that world-transforming intellectual movement called modernity in dialogue with Catholic responses to those thinkers. Through reading, writing and seminar discussion, the course challenges students to uncover what modernity means, what Catholicism means, and what synergies and antagonisms might exist between the two. Such discoveries provide a critical understanding of contemporary culture and provoke consideration of how one can live more thoughtful and responsible lives as scholars and servants in a postmodern world.

M491 Senior Seminar (2 cr.)

This course consists of student presentations from mathematics, mathematical modeling, mathematics education, or statistics. Each student chooses a topic in consultation with the instructor, do appropriate background reading, and prepare an oral presentation and written paper on the topic. A senior assessment test is administered as part of this course.

MG315 Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)

This course examines management practices unique to the small business environment and also provides a first look and overview of entrepreneurship. Course work examines the importance of entrepreneurship to market economies; other topics include developing ideas for new business ventures, formation and financing of new business ventures, and managing growth through the early years of operation. In addition, students write a detailed business plan based upon an idea of their choosing.

MG336 Human Resource Management (3 cr.)

The course centers upon utilizing and managing human resources by effective integration of personal goals and organizational goals. Topics include motivation, job attitudes, job performance, appraisal, recruitment, selection, training, and compensation (salary and fringe benefits).

MK371 Professional Selling and Sales Management (3 cr.)

The selling component of this course involves learning selling concepts and the communications skills needed to apply them. Topics include prospecting, approaching the customer, determining customer wants and needs, making the sales presentation, overcoming objections, and closing the sale. The management component of the course involves recruiting and hiring, training, determining sales territories, sales forecasting, compensation schemes motivation, and management of sales force.

MU341 Music History I (3 cr.)

This course is a writing intensive study of music history covering ancient, medieval, renaissance, and baroque western art music. A basic understanding of the history of western civilization is expected.

MU392 Music Business (3 cr.)

A series of guest presenters representing diverse fields within the music business offers insight as to their work in the music industry. This course provides an overview of some basic aspects of the music business including: copyright and publishing, music merchandising, some aspects of licensing, career management and promotion, networking and influences of technology.

P390/391 Advanced Laboratory I, II (1 each cr.)

This course is generally taken during the senior year, although it may be taken earlier. Students either submit a project to be explored or constructed, perform a series of measurements and subsequent data analysis on an already-existing apparatus, or undertake a computational or theoretical project under the guidance of the laboratory instructor. The project must include a significant writing component.

P410 Physics Directed Research (2 cr.)

This course is intended for all physics majors; it is recommended for majors in physics science education. It may be taken in addition to or in place of P390/391 Advanced Laboratory. Its purpose is to provide students an opportunity to explore a topic in physics in depth over a period of at least one semester under the guidance of a member of the physics faculty, and thereby demonstrate understanding of a particular concept or focused set of concepts at the advanced undergraduate level. It is also intended to give students project-based experience in experimental design, recordkeeping, and scientific writing.

PH402 Senior Thesis (3 cr.)

This course is taken in the second semester of the senior year and is an opportunity to work closely with a faculty member in the philosophy department on a written thesis.

PS342 Field Methods (4 cr.)

This course offers a working experience in the purpose and tools of qualitative field methods. The course covers rapport, methods of observation, field notes, data coding and analysis, ethnography, focus groups and interviews, as well as an introduction to quasi-experimentation.

PY370 Personality Psychology (4 cr.)

Personality psychology examines the question, "What does it mean to be a person?" This course includes historical ways in which we have tried to understand human persons. Classical personality theories including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, trait and humanistic/existential are studied and evaluated. Contemporary research in personality areas such as attachment, temperament, the big five traits, and psychological well-being is studied and integrated with historical and classical approaches.

PY490 Research: Data Collection (1 cr.)

In this course, students conduct collect data for their experiment or study, enter the data, and start to analyze the data. Independent research is emphasized in consultation with the instructor and an advisor.

PY498 Internship Integration (1 cr.)

Students research and write an integrative in-depth paper based upon the student's internship experience. The course is taken subsequent to or concurrent with the internship. An extensive literature review is conducted, including theoretical and empirical studies. Students make a formal public presentation based on their paper and internship. Graded pass/no credit.

S350 Field Methods (4 cr.)

This course offers a working experience in the purpose and tools of qualitative field methods. The course covers rapport, methods of observation, field notes, data coding and analysis, ethnography, focus groups and interviews, as well as an introduction to quasi-experimentation.

SP302 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

TH400 Christology (3 cr.)

This writing intensive course studies the development and interpretation of Christian theological doctrine on the person of Jesus of Nazareth, the Christ. The course treats issues from the various interpretations of the Gospel tradition to the development of doctrine (particularly in the councils of Nicaea and Chalcedon) to modern interpretations of the role of Christ in systematic theology.

Oral Communication Requirement

Complete two courses coded for oral communication, either
COM101 and LCT140
or LH105 and LH455

COM101 Public Speaking (3 cr.)

This course prepares students to make effective, informative and persuasive presentations incorporating audio-visual enhancements, and to utilize active listening techniques. The responsibilities of both the speaker and the listener are stressed. Practical experience in preparation, delivery/participation, and evaluation are provided.

LCT140 First-Year Seminar (3 cr.)

First-Year Seminar provides new students at Saint Mary's University with an integrated, initial academic experience that enables them to successfully begin the process of developing a Lasallian identity as educated and compassionate adults committed to ethical participation in our global society. To facilitate a practical transition from high school to college, emphasis is placed on developing the academic skills and attitudes necessary for students to think critically about those questions that help shape their identity as young adults: who am I?, what can I become?, and how can I become that person?

LH105 Origins of Human Thought and Culture (4 cr.)

As the first course in the Lasallian Honors Program at Saint Mary's University, Origins considers a variety of beginnings. This first-year seminar facilitates a successful transition to the university through its emphasis on developing critical academic skills and attitudes as well as appreciation of the university's Lasallian mission and of Winona's natural environment. Points of departure for understanding our intellectual, environmental and spiritual traditions include readings on the natural features of our region and on the life of Saint John Baptist de La Salle; the ancient narratives of Gilgamesh, Genesis and The Iliad; and a modern novel, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, which elaborates on the modern significance of ancient hero stories. As part of the introduction to the Saint Mary's community, and as a precursor to the Aesthetics course in the junior year of the honors program, students attend and discuss four local arts events during the semester. Students' participation as audience members provides opportunities to reflect on the nature and value of art in community and culture.

LH455 Lasallian Honors Capstone (4 cr.)

This senior-year colloquium provides a capstone experience for seniors in the honors program by having them explore, in a U.S. American context, four spheres of adult life: citizenship, work, relationships and spirituality. Students are challenged to engage these themes through close reading and discussion of texts, reflection on their education in the Lasallian Honors Program, and service learning. The course emphasizes an awareness of historical development of society and social construction of individuals and systems, the challenging and ownership of one's own beliefs, and the living out of Lasallian values in a contemporary world.

Critical-Thinking Requirement

The Critical-Thinking Requirement is satisfied within the major.

Problem-Solving Requirement

The Problem-Solving Requirement is satisfied with the Quantitative Systems course.