Spanish Major/Minor

More than ever, Spanish is an essential tool for business and cultural understanding throughout the Americas and around the world.

Career Options

A degree in Spanish opens the door to careers as interpreters and translators; news analysts, reporters, and correspondents; advertising, marketing, and public relations managers; elementary, middle, and high school teachers; and adult educators.

High School Preparation

Students choosing to major in Spanish benefit from prior exposure to the study of English, Spanish Language, Spanish Literature, European History, and World History.

Enhance Your Experience

Students who major in Spanish often pursue a double major or minor in international business, marketing, human services, or sociology.

Spanish Minor

Spanish minors with no prior language knowledge will learn how to speak, write, and read Spanish, and current speakers will enhance their skills. Spanish minors may also choose to study Spanish literature and culture.

Degree Requirements

A. All of the following if not placed into a higher level:

SP101 Beginning Conversational Spanish I (4 cr.)

Through the use of proficiency-based methodologies and multimedia this course helps students get acquainted with Hispanic cultures, discover similarities and differences between the target culture and their own, develop basic communication skills necessary to function in a Spanish-speaking country, and acquire basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Enrollment is limited to students who have not previously studied Spanish or who place into the course following the placement interview.

SP102 Beginning Conversational Spanish II (4 cr.)

A continuation of SP101.

SP201 Intermediate Conversational Spanish I (4 cr.)

This course uses an intensified conversational approach to build vocabulary, to review grammar, and to introduce the student to selected readings dealing with Hispanic literature, culture, and civilization.

SP202 Intermediate Conversational Spanish II (4 cr.)

A continuation of SP201.

B. The following courses:

SP301 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 cr.)

This course provides the oral practice and vocabulary necessary to move from simply describing the physical world toward a broader and more sophisticated use of the language. The students develop analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills; compare and contrast their own and the target culture; and hypothesize about links between the Spanish language and contemporary culture.

SP302 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language.

C. One of the following:

SP331 Civilization/Culture Spain (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the civilizations and cultures which have existed on the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. The students study the political, social, artistic, and intellectual evolution of Spain through a series of texts, images, and videos.

SP332 Civilization/Culture Latin America (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the diversity of the Hispanic world. Through a series of texts and videos the students address several important social, political, and cultural themes.

D. One of the following:

SP401 Medieval/Renaissance Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to major authors and literary works of Spain from the medieval period through the end of the 17th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP402 18th–20th Century Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Spain from the 18th through the 20th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP403 Latin American Literature through the 18th Century (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Latin America from the colonial period through the 18th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP404 19th–20th Century Latin American Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of modern Latin America. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are studied in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP405 Don Quijote (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, considered by many to be the first modern novel. This literary masterpiece, its author, its historical and social context, and other related works of the Spanish Golden Age will be studied in this class.

E. Senior Capstone

SP490 Senior Capstone (2 cr.)

Students complete a major independent research paper or other significant project of interest related to their primary major and present their project/findings at the end of the course.  Advanced instruction in research methods, drafting and revision, translation, and bibliographical work is provided through a series of sequenced assignments and revisions. 

F. Additional 300 or 400 level courses to complete a minimum of 27 credits

(if not used to meet C or D above)

Please Note:

At least one semester of study abroad is strongly suggested any time after completion of SP202. Courses taken abroad that are taught in Spanish count toward the major with approval of the department chair.  All study abroad courses taught in Spanish through Spanish Studies Abroad, HECUA or SMU will count toward the major.  Study abroad courses taught in Spanish through other programs will count toward the major with approval of the department chair.

A. All of the following courses

(or SMU placement equivalency)

SP101 Beginning Conversational Spanish I (4 cr.)

Through the use of proficiency-based methodologies and multimedia this course helps students get acquainted with Hispanic cultures, discover similarities and differences between the target culture and their own, develop basic communication skills necessary to function in a Spanish-speaking country, and acquire basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Enrollment is limited to students who have not previously studied Spanish or who place into the course following the placement interview.

SP102 Beginning Conversational Spanish II (4 cr.)

A continuation of SP101.

SP201 Intermediate Conversational Spanish I (4 cr.)

This course uses an intensified conversational approach to build vocabulary, to review grammar, and to introduce the student to selected readings dealing with Hispanic literature, culture, and civilization.

SP202 Intermediate Conversational Spanish II (4 cr.)

A continuation of SP201.

B. All of the following:

SP301 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 cr.)

This course provides the oral practice and vocabulary necessary to move from simply describing the physical world toward a broader and more sophisticated use of the language. The students develop analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills; compare and contrast their own and the target culture; and hypothesize about links between the Spanish language and contemporary culture.

SP302 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language.

C. Additional 300 and 400 level courses

  • Complete a minimum of 21 credits

Please Note:

At least one semester of study abroad is strongly suggested any time after completion of SP202. All study abroad courses taught in Spanish through Spanish Studies Abroad, HECUA or SMU will count toward the minor.  Study abroad courses taught in Spanish through other programs will count toward the minor with approval of the department chair.