Global Studies

Global Studies Major/Minor

The global studies major at Saint Mary’s focuses on global and cross-cultural issues, trends, and relations by applying the approaches of a variety of academic disciplines from the social sciences and humanities.

To enhance students’ cross-cultural skills and global awareness, global studies majors have a two-year foreign language requirement and will either study abroad for a semester or complete an internationally oriented internship.

The global studies major prepares students for careers requiring cross-cultural and global awareness, including careers in international organizations, internationally focused government agencies, charities, schools, or businesses through a factual understanding of global issues, trends, and relations.

Career Options

Foreign service officers; government executives and legislators; news analysts, reporters, and correspondents; postsecondary teachers; public interest advocates; and public interest lawyers.

High School Preparation

Comparative Government and Politics; Economics; Geography; Statistics; World History.

Enhance Your Experience

Students who major or minor in global studies oftentimes pursue courses in Spanish, business, or communication.

Global Studies Minor

Global studies minors find it supplements most any major in the liberal arts. A minor in global studies provides an essential foundation for understanding in our increasingly connected world.

Degree Requirements

A. All of the following:

AN300 Introduction to Anthropology (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of human culture. Topics: anthropology as an academic discipline, nature of human language, human culture, history of anthropological thought, and human social organizations.

GE305 Introduction to Geography (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of geography, with special emphasis on linking geography's basic concepts to the realms and major regions of the world.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

PS313 International Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines the basic structures of the international system including: 1) states, nations, transnationals, international organizations, diplomacy, etc.; 2) global issues including: war/peace, deterrence, arms control, political economy, trade, human rights, peacekeeping, etc.; and, 3) global ideas: sovereignty, nationalism, modernization, etc. This course deals extensively with the contemporary international system and the issues arising from the limitations of power in international affairs. Students apply this knowledge in a United Nations simulation.

PS320 Comparative Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines how different types of countries, i.e., established democracies, transitioning nations, and nondemocracies, are governed. The course examines first the broader trends and concepts about political systems and then engages in more in-depth case studies on a number of countries representing different regions, colonial and postcolonial experiences, levels of economic development, and government types.

B. One of the following:

BU215 Business Statistics (3 cr.)

Statistical techniques which are commonly used in all areas of business are studied. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and non-parametric statistics. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of each procedure and on communicating the results of statistical techniques to others.

ST132 Reasoning with Statistics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to develop student facility in the use of statistical methods and the understanding of statistical concepts. The course takes a practical approach based on statistical examples taken from everyday life. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. Appropriate technology is used to perform the calculations for many applications, and correspondingly an emphasis is placed on interpreting the results of statistical procedures. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST232.

ST232 Introduction to Statistics (2 cr.)

This course is designed to provide the basic ideas and techniques of statistics. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. This course makes significant use of appropriate technology. Topics in this course are treated at a higher mathematical level than they are treated in ST132. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST132.

C. Language Requirement:

  • Two years or equivalent of college-level modern language

D. Study abroad or internationally orientated internship:

  • Minimum of 3 credits and consent of chair required.

E. Upper Division Electives:

  • Six elective courses totaling 18 credits from F, G H & I with a minimum of one course from each of F, G H & I

F. Social Science:

Six elective courses totaling 18 credits from F, G H & I with a minimum of one course from each of F, G H & I

LCT375 Global Issues (3 cr.)

Global Issues, taken during a student's junior year, is designed to cultivate an understanding of the complexities inherent in our emerging global society and the ethical issues confronting them as members of a culturally diverse world. Each section of the course examines one or more specific problems or issues emerging from a global context by considering the issue(s) from multiple perspectives and with special attention toward the Lasallian concern for social justice.

PS314 American Foreign Policy (3 cr.)

This course studies the ideas, institutions, and individuals responsible for American foreign policy, the mechanics of its determination and implementation, with emphasis on current problems, policies and objectives in foreign policy.

PS315-319 Topics in International Relations (3 cr.)

Courses in this section are devoted to a thorough review, analysis, and evaluation of topics and methods that are relevant to the study of international relations and politics. Topics may include but are not limited to the following: war and peace, international political economy, international organizations, non-state actors in world politics, comparative foreign policy, trade and aid in the international system, global issues, regionalism in international relations, and other topics.

PS321-329 Topics in Comparative Government (3 cr.)

Courses in this series are devoted to a thorough review, analysis, and evaluation of topics and methods that are relevant to the current study of comparative politics and government. Topics may include but are not limited to the following: Asian politics and governments; Latin American politics and government; European politics and governments; comparative political leadership; political and economic development; comparative revolutionary movements; regimes, movements, and ideologies; and other topics.

G. Economic/Business:

Six elective courses totaling 18 credits from F, G H & I with a minimum of one course from each of F, G H & I

EC440 International Trade, Finance and Monetary Issues (3 cr.)

An intermediate course examining the forces which determine the competitive conditions and trade patterns in the global economy. Representative topics are monetary issues, balance of payments, capital movements and capital markets.

MG410 International Management (3 cr.)

This course investigates business management in the international arena. Emphasis is placed on how managers in multinational organizations address such issues as strategic analysis, organizational structure, global coordination, communications, inter-organizational cooperation, and human resource management.

MK430 International Marketing (3 cr.)

This course addresses the development of marketing strategies based on differing economic, legal, political, and sociocultural environments. Emphasis is placed on problems and practices of managing international marketing activities. Topics and challenges related to international marketing research, product and services; channels and distribution pricing and promotions are examined.

H. Cultural:

Six elective courses totaling 18 credits from F, G H & I with a minimum of one course from each of F, G H & I

E352 The Edge of Empire (3 cr.)

This course studies British Literature from the Victorian Age into the postmodern period by looking at it from the "outside." By studying works of literature from those writing on or about the periphery of the central literary tradition of the British empire, students gain a sense of post-1830 British literature and its relationship to the cultural conditions in which it was produced. Topics could include such areas as Colonial Literature, the Irish Literary Renaissance, and Women's Literature and consider writers such as Bram Stoker, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Katherine Mansfield, James Joyce, Graham Greene, Jean Rhys, Salman Rushdie, and Seamus Heaney.

E370 Literature in Evolution (3 cr.)

This course examines contemporary literature in English by writers from around the world. The course aims to convey a sense of the stylistic and thematic tendencies that continue to evolve in the literatures of our world by exposing students to intensive study of the representation of a particular theme or strain (e.g., imperialism, desire) in works by authors from a variety of backgrounds and social/ political situations.

E373 Post-Colonial Fictions (3 cr.)

This course focuses on literature in English that addresses colonization and decolonization. The course considers how postcolonial texts present the legacy of imperialism; how postcolonial writers inscribe their perspectives, politics, and lived experiences in literature; and how various fictional accounts (of origin, of colonization, of identity, of nationality) contribute to a contemporary understanding of community, history, and narrative.

E381 The Adventures of the Writer in World Literature (3 cr.)

A study of selected works from non-Anglo- American cultural traditions. Students in this course examine how geographical and cultural differences contribute to varying literary representations of "universal" themes. Taking as our point of departure the notion of the artist figure, we examine ancient and modern ideas of creativity, authorship, and the social role of the writer in society in cultures around the world.

E383 Geographies of Identity (3 cr.)

A study of selected works from non-Anglo- American cultural traditions. Students in this course explore literature from around the world with a focus on how identities, perspectives, and values are shaped by geographical and cultural circumstances. We look particularly at literary dialogues and confrontations between the Western European tradition and writers from other cultures, especially Russian and African, from the 19th century to today.

E390 Women's Narrative (3 cr.)

This course focuses on narrative strategies that are distinctive in literature by and/or about women and examine themes and issues that are common to women from a variety of social, historical, and/or political situations. In particular, the course examines how literature by and/or about women differs from literature by and/or about men, and how women writers inscribe their perspectives, politics, and lived experiences in literature.

H391 Chinese and Chinese–American Films as Cultural Makers (3 cr.)

This is designed to assist students to gain a general knowledge of Chinese history from the feudal dynasties to the present, to stimulate students in thinking clearly and critically about Chinese cultural values, to provide students with fundamental facts and documents of the development of Chinese society through the eyes of several Chinese movie directors, and to develop students' oral and writing communication skills. Specifically, this course investigates how films by such directors as Zhang Yimou and Chen Kaige, and stars such as Jackie Chan, Bruce Lee and Jet Li have shaped Western perceptions of China as well as encoded Chinese culture and history. Beginning with a comparison of The Emperor and the Assassin and Hero, students study how Chinese history is interpreted from two divergent points of view and representative of key Confucian and Daoism concepts. A study of Ang Lee's films offer the opportunity to investigate how a Taiwan-born, American director has been able to reshape and recondition both Chinese and American cultural icons.

MU341 Music History I (3 cr.)

This course is a writing intensive study of music history covering ancient, medieval, renaissance, and baroque western art music. A basic understanding of the history of western civilization is expected.

MU342 Music History II (3 cr.)

This course is a continuation of MU341. It is a writing intensive study of music history continuing through the classical, romantic and contemporary periods.

SP331 Civilization/Culture Spain (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the civilizations and cultures which have existed on the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. The students study the political, social, artistic, and intellectual evolution of Spain through a series of texts, images, and videos.

SP332 Civilization/Culture Latin America (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the diversity of the Hispanic world. Through a series of texts and videos the students address several important social, political, and cultural themes.

TH270 Christianity in a Global Context (3 cr.)

Through comparison and contrast, students define and articulate how the Christian, especially Roman Catholic, world view relates to those of others. Prior to such comparisons students focus on being able to articulate the basic world view of several mainstream religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and the religions of the Far East, especially Shinto, Dao and Confucian thought.

I. History:

Six elective courses totaling 18 credits from F, G H & I with a minimum of one course from each of F, G H & I

H311 U.S. Foreign Relations in the 20th Century (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the history of American foreign policy in the 20th century, the course seeks to increase students' awareness of the relationship of the U.S. to important issues of war and peace as they unfold in the world. It also pays attention to the linkage between the domestic political environment and its impact on foreign relations. Furthermore, it looks at important events and crises in U.S. foreign relations as well as some theories and practices of U.S. foreign policies. Students acquire a good set of tools to carry on their exploration of the impact of U.S. foreign policy on the rest of the world.

H315 American–East Asian Relations (3 cr.)

The aim of this course is to do three things: provide a general introduction to the history of relations between the United States and the major countries of the East Asian cultural sphere (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam); explore the changing images Americans have had of the peoples of these nations, the Chinese and Japanese in particular; and draw connections between both these themes and the experiences of Asian–American during the last century-and-a-half of American history. Special attention is paid to crisis in American–East Asian relations, such as: the Boxer Uprising and the 1900 siege of Beijing, World War II and the Occupation of Japan that followed, the Vietnam War, and contemporary disputes over issues of human rights in China (stemming from the June 4th Massacre of 1989). Through classroom lectures, course readings, and a critical viewing of a variety of visual materials (including excerpts from newsreels, newscasts, and feature films) students look at the process by which crisis involving American interests alter or give new life to enduring Western stereotypes concerning East Asia. A major goal of the course is to provide students with the analytical tools and historical background necessary to put future crises in U.S.–East Asian relations, as well as the American media's coverage of these crises, in perspective.

H317 History of Latin America (3 cr.)

The History of Latin America provides a historical overview of Latin America—broadly defined to include relevant parts of the Caribbean and French America—from the Spanish, Portuguese, and French conquests to the present day. The course pays attention to the following: the role of Indians and Africans in shaping Latin American societies; the conquest of Latin America; sugar and slavery; the role of the Catholic Church and other religions in Latin American cultures; Spanish and Portuguese administration; the independence movements of the nineteenth century; the revolutionary movements and military dictatorships of the twentieth century; Latin America's relationship with the United States and other world powers; liberation theology; and soccer, music, literature, and other expressions of Latin American culture.

H366 From Revolution to World War: Modern Europe 1789–1914 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the history of Europe during its explosive period of modernization, beginning with two concurrent world-changing events — the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Using a variety of sources, including works by historians but also primary sources ranging from manifestos and letters to plays and novels, students investigate the ideas and movements which emerged from this "dual revolution" to change the world, including imperialism, liberalism, socialism, feminism, and nationalism.

H367 Europe in the Era of World War 1914–1945 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Europe's "thirty year crisis," from the outbreak of World War I in 1914 to the end of World War II in 1945. Europe's period of progress and optimism was shattered by the "Great War" in 1914. Four years of violence created the crucible out of which the monster of fascism arose. This led to an even larger war only twenty years later. During WWII, mass slaughter became commonplace, from the Nazi Holocaust to the Allies' strategic bombing campaigns, which targeted civilian populations. Using a variety of sources, the course examines the big picture of great power confrontations, but also how the wars were experienced by individuals.

H380 Imperial Russia (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the political, social, economic and cultural history of the Russian Empire from its origins to the fall of the Romanovs. The course emphasizes the crisis of the old regime between the period of the Great Reforms of the 1860s and the revolution of 1917. In addition to works by historians, this course uses a variety of primary sources, including memoirs, manifestos, letters, and also works of literature by such authors as Aksakov, Turgenev and Tolstoy. The course seeks to lay a basis for understanding the Bolshevik experiment of the 20th century, as well as Russia's contemporary struggle to define its identity after the collapse of the Soviet state.

H381 Revolutionary and Post-Revolutionary Russia (3 cr.)

The Soviet Union disintegrated into 15 new states, the largest of which is Russia, in 1991. This event was widely heralded in the West as a turn to democratic capitalism; a decade later this was no longer so clear. This course lays the basis for an informed understanding of today's Russia by introducing its history in this century. The course highlights the revolutionary period including the Bolshevik seizure of power and Stalin's "second revolution," and also the recent past, including the periods dominated by Mikhail Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin. In addition to works by historians, the course uses a variety of primary sources, including speeches, manifestos, eyewitness accounts, novels, and a series of influential Soviet films.

H390 Modern China (3 cr.)

This is a survey of Chinese history from the rise of the Qing Dynasty in the mid-17th century to the protest and repression of 1989. It discusses some of the main social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual features of the "traditional" Chinese world the first Qing emperors ruled. It also covers the way this world changed as China experienced a series of convulsive events, including both threats from abroad and domestic rebellions and revolutions.

J. Both of the following

GS489 Thesis Development (1 cr.)

Students choose a topic and design the research project required of Global Studies majors. The course is conducted primarily on an independent basis in consultation with the global studies coordinator.

GS490 Research in Global Studies (2 cr.)

Students complete the original research project required of Global Studies majors.

A. All of the following:

AN300 Introduction to Anthropology (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of human culture. Topics: anthropology as an academic discipline, nature of human language, human culture, history of anthropological thought, and human social organizations.

GE305 Introduction to Geography (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of geography, with special emphasis on linking geography's basic concepts to the realms and major regions of the world.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

PS313 International Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines the basic structures of the international system including: 1) states, nations, transnationals, international organizations, diplomacy, etc.; 2) global issues including: war/peace, deterrence, arms control, political economy, trade, human rights, peacekeeping, etc.; and, 3) global ideas: sovereignty, nationalism, modernization, etc. This course deals extensively with the contemporary international system and the issues arising from the limitations of power in international affairs. Students apply this knowledge in a United Nations simulation.

PS320 Comparative Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines how different types of countries, i.e., established democracies, transitioning nations, and nondemocracies, are governed. The course examines first the broader trends and concepts about political systems and then engages in more in-depth case studies on a number of countries representing different regions, colonial and postcolonial experiences, levels of economic development, and government types.

B. One of the following:

BU215 Business Statistics (3 cr.)

Statistical techniques which are commonly used in all areas of business are studied. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and non-parametric statistics. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of each procedure and on communicating the results of statistical techniques to others.

ST132 Reasoning with Statistics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to develop student facility in the use of statistical methods and the understanding of statistical concepts. The course takes a practical approach based on statistical examples taken from everyday life. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. Appropriate technology is used to perform the calculations for many applications, and correspondingly an emphasis is placed on interpreting the results of statistical procedures. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST232.

ST232 Introduction to Statistics (2 cr.)

This course is designed to provide the basic ideas and techniques of statistics. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. This course makes significant use of appropriate technology. Topics in this course are treated at a higher mathematical level than they are treated in ST132. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST132.

C. Language Requirement:

  • One year or equivalent of college-level modern language.