Theatre Major/Minor

Study in theatre at Saint Mary’s offers students learning opportunities ranging from creative personal expression to design, technology, and management skills needed for staging professional-caliber performances.

Theatre majors can choose from five tracks: Musical Theatre, Dance, Acting/Directing, Design/Technology, or General Studies. Depending on the track chosen, major students gain specific skills in a variety of theatre-related areas:

Performance Studies

Focuses on acting, directing, voice and movement, dance, and psychology.

Musical Theatre

Emphasizes acting, voice and movement, singing for the stage, dance, music theory, piano, music ensembles, and musical theatre history.

Technical Theatre

Centers on scenic, lighting and costume design, theatre crafts, studio art, and stage management.

Theatre Management

Coursework includes stage management, arts administration, accounting, marketing, business management, and graphic design.

Career Options

Faculty at Saint Mary's prepare graduating majors to explore entry-level positions in theatre or dance, or to pursue further graduate studies in these art forms. In addition, theatre study provides for future pursuit of theatre and dance opportunities, whether as a profession, hobby, or as a personal source of enjoyment. 

High School Preparation

English; Literature; Dance; Performance Arts; Public Speaking

Enhance Your Experience

A theatre major or minor pairs well with a number of majors, including education, art studio, history, literature, music, and music performance.

Theatre Minor

Saint Mary's students who minor in theatre will find it an ideal way to enhance their education by obtaining skills in high demand by employers such as creative thinking, problem-solving, verbal and nonverbal communications, and confidence and experience in public speaking.

Degree Requirements

A. One of the following

MU130 Music Fundamentals I (1 cr.)

This course is designed to be an introduction to music reading and understanding. The fundamentals of pitch and rhythm are covered along with ear training and score reading in this computer-assisted course.

MU131 Music Fundamentals II (1 cr.)

This is a continuation of Music Fundamentals I.

MU160 Music Theory I (3 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in increasing their knowledge of the basic elements of music. Concepts covered include: keys, scales, simple and compound rhythms, intervals, triads, 7th chords, principles of voice leading, harmonic progression, cadences, phrases and periods.

MU171 Piano Class (3 cr.)

This course provides a basic introduction to music and the keyboard. Students learn to read music in treble and bass clefs, become familiar with basic music vocabulary and symbols, and develop keyboard skills. Students also study the history of piano music and piano playing in order to deepen their understanding of the instrument. This course is open to all students with an interest in music, and fulfills the general education aesthetics content area course requirement.

B All of the following:

DA365 Musical Theatre Dance (2 cr.)

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of and ability to perform dances of the modern American musical stage. Students learn techniques and styles of contemporary dance as it is specifically applied to musical theatre, emphasizing theatre dance styles from the 1920s to the present. The course also encompasses research of the styles of major musical theatre choreographers and performers noteworthy for their musical dance innovations.

MU170 Ear Training I (2 cr.)

The objective of this course is to develop aural skills involving melody, rhythm and harmony. Concepts covered include: identification of intervals, scales, triads, sight-singing and one voice melodic and rhythmic dictations.

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

TA257 Musical Theatre I: Auditioning (3 cr.)

With an "on your feet" approach, students explore the relationship between acting and singing through structural analysis of the songs and lyrics, character development, and performance techniques. This course allows the development of the singing voice as an extension of speech as well as to physicalize the text. Audition techniques are explored.

TA357 Musical Theatre II: Workshop (3 cr.)

The workshop serves as a production caldron. Tailored to the specific needs of the students in the class, the workshop concentrates on the journey from script and score to public performance. The class will be run in the context of a rehearsal in that the elements of historical context, analysis, music, staging, choreography, and character work will combine to create the musical performance. The semester will culminate in a showcase of individual, vocal ensemble, and musical scene performances.

C. Two dance technique level II courses

D. Two semesters of

DA175/TA175 or DA375/TA375   

A. Theatre core requirements:

(33 credits)

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

TA105 Stage Craft and Lab (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the basic techniques commonly used in theatre production. This course is the prerequisite for all theatre design courses. The course focuses on simultaneous development of crafts found in scenery, lighting, and costumes. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Theatre and Arts Major & Minor requirement and the prerequisite for design courses.

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

TA240 Directing I (3 cr.)

This course considers the elemental concerns for the director including movement, composition, and a review of script analysis techniques. Students practice techniques in short classroom scenes and through guided practice in directing scenes to be presented for an audience.

TA299 Career Development I: Sophomore Review (0 cr.)

Students are introduced to developing necessary materials and documentation for the academic and professional theatre portfolio. Topics include resumes, headshots, monologues, songs, design/tech portfolios, and the e-portfolio for their area of focus. Emphasis is placed on readying materials for the departmental sophomore review including writing the narrative statement of career goals, as well as preparing applications for summer theatre work.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA360 London Page to the Stage (3 cr.)

This course explores the transfer of dramatic literature from the page to the stage. Prior to attending a London production, students analyze and interpret a given text and discuss its possible production requirements. After viewing the production students assess it based on their pre-production analysis and interpretation.

TA425 Career Development II: Senior Capstone (1 cr.)

This course helps students develop documents and materials relative to auditioning and interviewing for theatre related employment. Topics include resumes, head shots, monologues/songs, cold readings, design/tech portfolios, cover letters, call boards, graduate school/additional training, audition/interview protocol, talent and casting agencies, film-TV-industrials, unions and organizations, living in a large city, and more.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

B. Students must complete a minimum of 3 credits in design/technical theatre from:

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

C. All of the following:

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA260 Acting II: Voice and Movement (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce the student to various techniques in vocal production and movement for the stage. Emphasis is placed on freeing the natural voice and exploring movement to release physical tension providing flexibility and versatility. Throughout the course students explore voice and movement as they are connected with psychological and emotional impulses.

TA358 Acting III: London (3 cr.)

The course is taught during the London semester. It examines the British approach to scene work and the rehearsal process. Time is spent in working with the Standard British RP dialect. Students work with scenes written by British playwrights such as Shakespeare, Noel Coward, Tom Stoppard, and Harold Pinter.

TA499 Graduation Project (1-3 cr.)

Theatre majors may complete a graduation project, which may be of either a creative or a research nature. The topic must be approved by the department faculty before the project is undertaken. In every case, there must be a written component which describes and evaluates the process. Normally, the project is presented to the department faculty and staff for a formal oral evaluation.

D. One Dance Technique Class from:

DA110 Tap I (0 or 2 cr.)

This course introduces a dance style not only seen but heard as the rhythmic structure unfolds. It is designed to explore the rudiments of tap dance techniques as an entertaining form of dance. No dance experience necessary.

DA120 Jazz I (0 or 2 cr.)

This introduction to the stylization of Jazz dance emphasizes the basic technical work of isolations and an overview of the development of jazz dance from its origin. No dance experience necessary.

DA130 Modern I (0 or 2 cr.)

This is an introductory course in modern dance technique. Students learn a blend of techniques including fall and recovery, and contraction and release. No dance experience necessary.

DA140 Ballet I (0 or 2 cr.)

This is a beginning course offering the basic theory and practice of classical ballet and ballet terminology, emphasizing the use of placement. No dance experience necessary.

DA210 Tap II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build student's knowledge of tap terminology and offers an intermediate level of tap technique.

DA220 Jazz II (2 cr.)

This course continues to work toward building the vocabulary of jazz technique, isolations, and extended rhythmical phrasing.

DA230 Modern II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build students' modern dance technique. Students are introduced to the principles of improvisation, blend of techniques including fall and recovery, and contraction and release.

DA240 Ballet II (2 cr.)

The course builds the beginning ballet vocabulary, furthering the acquisition of placement and technique, ballet terminology, and ballet as an art form.

DA310 Tap III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of tap dance technique. Students are introduced to syncopation and performance styles, and continue to build a strong tap dance vocabulary.

DA320 Jazz III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of jazz dance technique. Students are introduced to rhythmical phrasing and continue to build a strong jazz dance vocabulary.

DA330 Modern III (2 cr.)

This course provides an intermediate level of modern dance technique and vocabulary furthering the exploration of improvisation.

DA340 Ballet III (2 cr.)

An intermediate level of classical ballet, concentrating on extended vocabulary and the advancement of technique.

DA410 Tap IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of rhythm tap with a strong concentration on technique, syncopation and performance styles, including the exploration of improvisation and choreography.

DA420 Jazz IV (2 cr.)

An advanced level of jazz dance providing the continuation of strong techniques as well as developing artistry and performance qualities through the exploration of choreography.

DA430 Modern IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of modern dance technique with a strong concentration on improvisation, choreograph and artistry.

DA440 Ballet IV (2 cr.)

A fast intermediate level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique.

DA450 Ballet V (2 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study pointe technique.

DA455 Ballet VI (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique, while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

DA460 Ballet VII (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet providing the continuation of placement technique, while focusing on advanced artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

E. Six Rehearsal/Performance Labs:

DA175 Rehearsal Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production.

DA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' dance production.

TA175 Rehearsal: Performance Lab (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

TA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

F. Take appropriate directing or acting course for your area:

TA340 Directing II (3 cr.)

Consideration of more complex directorial issues, including advanced actor coaching, working with production managers, achieving style and unity, and dramatic criticism. Students direct scenes for thrust and arena stages. The course is also designed to hone communication skills necessary for effective collaboration in the director/designer relationship such as how to develop, create, and research a concept and vision. Directing of classroom scenes is required as well as the directing of a one-act play to be performed for an audience.

TA470 Acting IV: Styles (3 cr.)

This course provides for the study of various acting styles found in the genres of realism, comedy, and tragedy. Periods of study include Elizabethan, Restoration, French Neoclassic, Victorian, and/or Early American. Work is focused on researching the background and demands of each period and style and to include this work in more intense scene and monologue work.

G. 3 additional credits from:

TA257 Musical Theatre I: Auditioning (3 cr.)

With an "on your feet" approach, students explore the relationship between acting and singing through structural analysis of the songs and lyrics, character development, and performance techniques. This course allows the development of the singing voice as an extension of speech as well as to physicalize the text. Audition techniques are explored.

TA340 Directing II (3 cr.)

Consideration of more complex directorial issues, including advanced actor coaching, working with production managers, achieving style and unity, and dramatic criticism. Students direct scenes for thrust and arena stages. The course is also designed to hone communication skills necessary for effective collaboration in the director/designer relationship such as how to develop, create, and research a concept and vision. Directing of classroom scenes is required as well as the directing of a one-act play to be performed for an audience.

TA346-349 Special Topics in Theatre (1-3 cr.)

Courses dealing with specialized topics, including those relevant to the actor, director, designers, or other theatre practitioners.

TA350 Playwriting Workshop (3 cr.)

This course consists of building blocks for those interested in pursuing playwriting. Techniques for character development, conflict, dialogue, and dramatic action will be explored through specific writing assignments. The culminating work is a short one-act play written by students.

TA357 Musical Theatre II: Workshop (3 cr.)

The workshop serves as a production caldron. Tailored to the specific needs of the students in the class, the workshop concentrates on the journey from script and score to public performance. The class will be run in the context of a rehearsal in that the elements of historical context, analysis, music, staging, choreography, and character work will combine to create the musical performance. The semester will culminate in a showcase of individual, vocal ensemble, and musical scene performances.

TA450 Arts Administration: Theory and Practice (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of arts administration as it applies to the performing arts, visual arts, and arts services organizations. Topics explored include management models, marketing, development, finances and facilities management and planning. Students apply knowledge in these areas to an arts organization which they create in class. The course culminates with the students presenting their projects in executive session.

TA470 Acting IV: Styles (3 cr.)

This course provides for the study of various acting styles found in the genres of realism, comedy, and tragedy. Periods of study include Elizabethan, Restoration, French Neoclassic, Victorian, and/or Early American. Work is focused on researching the background and demands of each period and style and to include this work in more intense scene and monologue work.

H. Not Required

  • Although not required, candidates are highly encouraged to participate in the Dublin Workshop at Gaiety School of Acting (end of the London semester).

I. Not Required

  • Although not required, directing candidates are highly encouraged to take TA243 Stage Management.

A. Theatre core requirements:

(33 credits)

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

TA105 Stage Craft and Lab (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the basic techniques commonly used in theatre production. This course is the prerequisite for all theatre design courses. The course focuses on simultaneous development of crafts found in scenery, lighting, and costumes. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Theatre and Arts Major & Minor requirement and the prerequisite for design courses.

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

TA240 Directing I (3 cr.)

This course considers the elemental concerns for the director including movement, composition, and a review of script analysis techniques. Students practice techniques in short classroom scenes and through guided practice in directing scenes to be presented for an audience.

TA299 Career Development I: Sophomore Review (0 cr.)

Students are introduced to developing necessary materials and documentation for the academic and professional theatre portfolio. Topics include resumes, headshots, monologues, songs, design/tech portfolios, and the e-portfolio for their area of focus. Emphasis is placed on readying materials for the departmental sophomore review including writing the narrative statement of career goals, as well as preparing applications for summer theatre work.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA360 London Page to the Stage (3 cr.)

This course explores the transfer of dramatic literature from the page to the stage. Prior to attending a London production, students analyze and interpret a given text and discuss its possible production requirements. After viewing the production students assess it based on their pre-production analysis and interpretation.

TA425 Career Development II: Senior Capstone (1 cr.)

This course helps students develop documents and materials relative to auditioning and interviewing for theatre related employment. Topics include resumes, head shots, monologues/songs, cold readings, design/tech portfolios, cover letters, call boards, graduate school/additional training, audition/interview protocol, talent and casting agencies, film-TV-industrials, unions and organizations, living in a large city, and more.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

B. Students must complete a minimum of 3 credits in design/technical theatre from:

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

C. All of the following:

DA280 Anatomy and Kinesiology for the Performing Artist (3 cr.)

This course explores the human body and how it functions in relation to the performer's body. Students learn through readings, lectures, class discussions, and in-class projects. There is a special focus on muscular and skeletal systems, prevention and care of injuries, and conditioning.

DA370 Dance Composition (2 cr.)

This course explores basic choreographic methods with an emphasis placed on improvisation as a vehicle to creating movement phrases. Students also learn through readings, lectures, class discussions, and in-class projects.

DA380 Dance History (3 cr.)

This course provides an in-depth survey of the history of concert dance forms, including ballet, modern dance, jazz dance and tap dance. Discussion, assignments and text provide background concerning the influences of social and world dance on these ever-changing dance forms. A research paper is a requirement for this course.

DA499 Graduation Project (1-3 cr.)

This course allows students to apply compositional concepts, principles of choreographic structure, critical thinking and coordination skills in the development of a final dance project. This is a capstone course for dance minors only.

D. Four Dance Technique Classes (level II or higher)

DA210 Tap II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build student's knowledge of tap terminology and offers an intermediate level of tap technique.

DA220 Jazz II (2 cr.)

This course continues to work toward building the vocabulary of jazz technique, isolations, and extended rhythmical phrasing.

DA230 Modern II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build students' modern dance technique. Students are introduced to the principles of improvisation, blend of techniques including fall and recovery, and contraction and release.

DA240 Ballet II (2 cr.)

The course builds the beginning ballet vocabulary, furthering the acquisition of placement and technique, ballet terminology, and ballet as an art form.

DA310 Tap III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of tap dance technique. Students are introduced to syncopation and performance styles, and continue to build a strong tap dance vocabulary.

DA320 Jazz III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of jazz dance technique. Students are introduced to rhythmical phrasing and continue to build a strong jazz dance vocabulary.

DA330 Modern III (2 cr.)

This course provides an intermediate level of modern dance technique and vocabulary furthering the exploration of improvisation.

DA340 Ballet III (2 cr.)

An intermediate level of classical ballet, concentrating on extended vocabulary and the advancement of technique.

DA410 Tap IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of rhythm tap with a strong concentration on technique, syncopation and performance styles, including the exploration of improvisation and choreography.

DA420 Jazz IV (2 cr.)

An advanced level of jazz dance providing the continuation of strong techniques as well as developing artistry and performance qualities through the exploration of choreography.

DA430 Modern IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of modern dance technique with a strong concentration on improvisation, choreograph and artistry.

DA440 Ballet IV (2 cr.)

A fast intermediate level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique.

DA450 Ballet V (2 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study pointe technique.

DA455 Ballet VI (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique, while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

DA460 Ballet VII (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet providing the continuation of placement technique, while focusing on advanced artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

E. Five Rehearsal/Performance Labs

DA175 Rehearsal Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production.

DA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' dance production.

TA175 Rehearsal: Performance Lab (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

TA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

A. Theatre core requirements:

(33 credits)

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

TA105 Stage Craft and Lab (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the basic techniques commonly used in theatre production. This course is the prerequisite for all theatre design courses. The course focuses on simultaneous development of crafts found in scenery, lighting, and costumes. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Theatre and Arts Major & Minor requirement and the prerequisite for design courses.

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

TA240 Directing I (3 cr.)

This course considers the elemental concerns for the director including movement, composition, and a review of script analysis techniques. Students practice techniques in short classroom scenes and through guided practice in directing scenes to be presented for an audience.

TA299 Career Development I: Sophomore Review (0 cr.)

Students are introduced to developing necessary materials and documentation for the academic and professional theatre portfolio. Topics include resumes, headshots, monologues, songs, design/tech portfolios, and the e-portfolio for their area of focus. Emphasis is placed on readying materials for the departmental sophomore review including writing the narrative statement of career goals, as well as preparing applications for summer theatre work.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA360 London Page to the Stage (3 cr.)

This course explores the transfer of dramatic literature from the page to the stage. Prior to attending a London production, students analyze and interpret a given text and discuss its possible production requirements. After viewing the production students assess it based on their pre-production analysis and interpretation.

TA425 Career Development II: Senior Capstone (1 cr.)

This course helps students develop documents and materials relative to auditioning and interviewing for theatre related employment. Topics include resumes, head shots, monologues/songs, cold readings, design/tech portfolios, cover letters, call boards, graduate school/additional training, audition/interview protocol, talent and casting agencies, film-TV-industrials, unions and organizations, living in a large city, and more.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

B. Students must complete a minimum of 3 credits in design/technical theatre from:

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

C. Three of the following:

TA230 Electrics and Sound for Theatre (2 cr.)

This course provides the necessary hands-on learning required to work as a master electrician or sound operator in theatre specifically focusing on the venues at Saint Mary's. Students will learn to distinguish between various lighting instruments, cable, gel, and hookups and be able to hang the instruments, plug them in, dress the cable, gel and focus lighting instruments, and run the board. Students will also learn to set up the sound equipment (including speakers, microphones, monitors, and amplifiers) as well as run the sound board for live and recorded purposes.

TA242 Stage Makeup (2 cr.)

This course explores the fundamental artistic and technical craft of the stage makeup artist. Through discussion, demonstration, projects, and image research students will define the scope of a makeup artist's job description and responsibilities. Students will learn to apply basic stage makeup as well as character and specialty makeup.

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

TA346-349 Special Topics in Theatre (1-3 cr.)

Courses dealing with specialized topics, including those relevant to the actor, director, designers, or other theatre practitioners.

D. All of the following:

TA110 Introduction to Visual Communication for Theatre (3 cr.)

This course will provide the foundation for additional theatrical design courses. It is intended to introduce the student to the basic theories, practices, and functions of theatrical design and the roles of theatrical scenic, lighting, costume, and sound designers. The course will examine the elements of design, the principles of composition, and the design process from initial concept through finished design. In this class, students will create and analyze compositions in order to learn the processes and tools the designer uses to solve design problems and communicate these solutions to others visually. These tools are both conceptual (manipulating elements and principles of design) and physical (freehand drawing, figure drawing, model making, and painting).

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA243 Stage Management (2 cr.)

This course introduces the student to the techniques and essential crafts of the theatrical stage manager. Through discussion, role play, script analysis and research, and the assembling of a prompt book, the scope of a professional stage manager's job description and responsibilities will be explored. Areas covered include planning and organization, auditions, rehearsal rules, managing rehearsals, information distribution, preparing for tech and dress rehearsals, pre-performance activities, duties during performance, organizational structures, and human behavior within theatre.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA342 Assistant Scenic Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, engineering/drafting, tech week, and fabrication, as needed.

TA343 Assistant Costume Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, rendering, tech week, and construction, as needed.

TA345 Assistant Lighting Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, plotting, tech week, and hang and focus, as needed.

TA499 Graduation Project (1-3 cr.)

Theatre majors may complete a graduation project, which may be of either a creative or a research nature. The topic must be approved by the department faculty before the project is undertaken. In every case, there must be a written component which describes and evaluates the process. Normally, the project is presented to the department faculty and staff for a formal oral evaluation.

E. Six Crew/Performance Labs:

TA185 Crew: Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is an experiential-based course open to all students interested in a guided study of various theatrical arts in the context of a production atmosphere. In the production setting, the focus is on running all back stage elements of a show from technical rehearsals through closing performance and strike. Through individual running crew assignments, students will learn what the duties and requirements are to mounting a theatre production, and running it during performances. Can be taken up to six times for credit. May not be taken more than twice in a semester.

TA385 Crew: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is an experiential-based course open to all students interested in a guided study of various theatrical arts in the context of a production atmosphere. In the production setting, the focus is on leadership roles in running all back stage elements of a show from technical rehearsals through closing performance and strike. Through leadership crew assignments, students will facilitate mounting a theatre production and running it during performances. May be taken up to six times for credit. May not be repeated more than twice in a semester.

A. The following course:

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

B. One of the following:

TA105 Stage Craft and Lab (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the basic techniques commonly used in theatre production. This course is the prerequisite for all theatre design courses. The course focuses on simultaneous development of crafts found in scenery, lighting, and costumes. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Theatre and Arts Major & Minor requirement and the prerequisite for design courses.

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

C. One of the following:

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

D. Two of the following:

DA175 Rehearsal Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production.

DA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' dance production.

TA175 Rehearsal: Performance Lab (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

TA185 Crew: Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is an experiential-based course open to all students interested in a guided study of various theatrical arts in the context of a production atmosphere. In the production setting, the focus is on running all back stage elements of a show from technical rehearsals through closing performance and strike. Through individual running crew assignments, students will learn what the duties and requirements are to mounting a theatre production, and running it during performances. Can be taken up to six times for credit. May not be taken more than twice in a semester.

TA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

TA385 Crew: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is an experiential-based course open to all students interested in a guided study of various theatrical arts in the context of a production atmosphere. In the production setting, the focus is on leadership roles in running all back stage elements of a show from technical rehearsals through closing performance and strike. Through leadership crew assignments, students will facilitate mounting a theatre production and running it during performances. May be taken up to six times for credit. May not be repeated more than twice in a semester.

E. Eleven additional credits, including six upper division credits, from the following:

TA230 Electrics and Sound for Theatre (2 cr.)

This course provides the necessary hands-on learning required to work as a master electrician or sound operator in theatre specifically focusing on the venues at Saint Mary's. Students will learn to distinguish between various lighting instruments, cable, gel, and hookups and be able to hang the instruments, plug them in, dress the cable, gel and focus lighting instruments, and run the board. Students will also learn to set up the sound equipment (including speakers, microphones, monitors, and amplifiers) as well as run the sound board for live and recorded purposes.

TA242 Stage Makeup (2 cr.)

This course explores the fundamental artistic and technical craft of the stage makeup artist. Through discussion, demonstration, projects, and image research students will define the scope of a makeup artist's job description and responsibilities. Students will learn to apply basic stage makeup as well as character and specialty makeup.

TA243 Stage Management (2 cr.)

This course introduces the student to the techniques and essential crafts of the theatrical stage manager. Through discussion, role play, script analysis and research, and the assembling of a prompt book, the scope of a professional stage manager's job description and responsibilities will be explored. Areas covered include planning and organization, auditions, rehearsal rules, managing rehearsals, information distribution, preparing for tech and dress rehearsals, pre-performance activities, duties during performance, organizational structures, and human behavior within theatre.

TA257 Musical Theatre I: Auditioning (3 cr.)

With an "on your feet" approach, students explore the relationship between acting and singing through structural analysis of the songs and lyrics, character development, and performance techniques. This course allows the development of the singing voice as an extension of speech as well as to physicalize the text. Audition techniques are explored.

TA260 Acting II: Voice and Movement (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce the student to various techniques in vocal production and movement for the stage. Emphasis is placed on freeing the natural voice and exploring movement to release physical tension providing flexibility and versatility. Throughout the course students explore voice and movement as they are connected with psychological and emotional impulses.

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA302 Modern Movies (3 cr.)

An introductory study of important contemporary films for students who wish to learn how to understand and evaluate popular cinema. Students are introduced to the history of film-making as well as basic film techniques. Movies are screened, discussed and evaluated in terms of content, style and intent. Students have the opportunity to react and formulate their own aesthetic preferences through a series of written and oral responses to the films. This course satisfies an Aesthetic general education requirement.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA330 Dublin Theatre Workshop (0-1 cr.)

This two-week course is typically offered as an extension of the London semester. The two-week workshop at the Gaiety School of Acting is intended to give students an intensive experience in the acting, technical, or administrative areas of theatre. Participants study Irish theatre literature and hone their skills. Attending performances and visiting significant cultural sites also includes a weekend in Galway.

TA340 Directing II (3 cr.)

Consideration of more complex directorial issues, including advanced actor coaching, working with production managers, achieving style and unity, and dramatic criticism. Students direct scenes for thrust and arena stages. The course is also designed to hone communication skills necessary for effective collaboration in the director/designer relationship such as how to develop, create, and research a concept and vision. Directing of classroom scenes is required as well as the directing of a one-act play to be performed for an audience.

TA342 Assistant Scenic Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, engineering/drafting, tech week, and fabrication, as needed.

TA343 Assistant Costume Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, rendering, tech week, and construction, as needed.

TA345 Assistant Lighting Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, plotting, tech week, and hang and focus, as needed.

TA346-349 Special Topics in Theatre (1-3 cr.)

Courses dealing with specialized topics, including those relevant to the actor, director, designers, or other theatre practitioners.

TA350 Playwriting Workshop (3 cr.)

This course consists of building blocks for those interested in pursuing playwriting. Techniques for character development, conflict, dialogue, and dramatic action will be explored through specific writing assignments. The culminating work is a short one-act play written by students.

TA357 Musical Theatre II: Workshop (3 cr.)

The workshop serves as a production caldron. Tailored to the specific needs of the students in the class, the workshop concentrates on the journey from script and score to public performance. The class will be run in the context of a rehearsal in that the elements of historical context, analysis, music, staging, choreography, and character work will combine to create the musical performance. The semester will culminate in a showcase of individual, vocal ensemble, and musical scene performances.

TA358 Acting III: London (3 cr.)

The course is taught during the London semester. It examines the British approach to scene work and the rehearsal process. Time is spent in working with the Standard British RP dialect. Students work with scenes written by British playwrights such as Shakespeare, Noel Coward, Tom Stoppard, and Harold Pinter.

A. Theatre core requirements:

(33 credits)

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

TA105 Stage Craft and Lab (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the basic techniques commonly used in theatre production. This course is the prerequisite for all theatre design courses. The course focuses on simultaneous development of crafts found in scenery, lighting, and costumes. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Theatre and Arts Major & Minor requirement and the prerequisite for design courses.

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

TA240 Directing I (3 cr.)

This course considers the elemental concerns for the director including movement, composition, and a review of script analysis techniques. Students practice techniques in short classroom scenes and through guided practice in directing scenes to be presented for an audience.

TA299 Career Development I: Sophomore Review (0 cr.)

Students are introduced to developing necessary materials and documentation for the academic and professional theatre portfolio. Topics include resumes, headshots, monologues, songs, design/tech portfolios, and the e-portfolio for their area of focus. Emphasis is placed on readying materials for the departmental sophomore review including writing the narrative statement of career goals, as well as preparing applications for summer theatre work.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA360 London Page to the Stage (3 cr.)

This course explores the transfer of dramatic literature from the page to the stage. Prior to attending a London production, students analyze and interpret a given text and discuss its possible production requirements. After viewing the production students assess it based on their pre-production analysis and interpretation.

TA425 Career Development II: Senior Capstone (1 cr.)

This course helps students develop documents and materials relative to auditioning and interviewing for theatre related employment. Topics include resumes, head shots, monologues/songs, cold readings, design/tech portfolios, cover letters, call boards, graduate school/additional training, audition/interview protocol, talent and casting agencies, film-TV-industrials, unions and organizations, living in a large city, and more.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

B. Students must complete a minimum of 3 credits in design/technical theatre from:

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

C. All of the following:

DA365 Musical Theatre Dance (2 cr.)

This course is designed to enhance students' understanding of and ability to perform dances of the modern American musical stage. Students learn techniques and styles of contemporary dance as it is specifically applied to musical theatre, emphasizing theatre dance styles from the 1920s to the present. The course also encompasses research of the styles of major musical theatre choreographers and performers noteworthy for their musical dance innovations.

MU170 Ear Training I (2 cr.)

The objective of this course is to develop aural skills involving melody, rhythm and harmony. Concepts covered include: identification of intervals, scales, triads, sight-singing and one voice melodic and rhythmic dictations.

TA257 Musical Theatre I: Auditioning (3 cr.)

With an "on your feet" approach, students explore the relationship between acting and singing through structural analysis of the songs and lyrics, character development, and performance techniques. This course allows the development of the singing voice as an extension of speech as well as to physicalize the text. Audition techniques are explored.

TA357 Musical Theatre II: Workshop (3 cr.)

The workshop serves as a production caldron. Tailored to the specific needs of the students in the class, the workshop concentrates on the journey from script and score to public performance. The class will be run in the context of a rehearsal in that the elements of historical context, analysis, music, staging, choreography, and character work will combine to create the musical performance. The semester will culminate in a showcase of individual, vocal ensemble, and musical scene performances.

TA499 Graduation Project (1-3 cr.)

Theatre majors may complete a graduation project, which may be of either a creative or a research nature. The topic must be approved by the department faculty before the project is undertaken. In every case, there must be a written component which describes and evaluates the process. Normally, the project is presented to the department faculty and staff for a formal oral evaluation.

D. Two Dance Technique classes (level II or higher) from:

DA210 Tap II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build student's knowledge of tap terminology and offers an intermediate level of tap technique.

DA220 Jazz II (2 cr.)

This course continues to work toward building the vocabulary of jazz technique, isolations, and extended rhythmical phrasing.

DA230 Modern II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build students' modern dance technique. Students are introduced to the principles of improvisation, blend of techniques including fall and recovery, and contraction and release.

DA240 Ballet II (2 cr.)

The course builds the beginning ballet vocabulary, furthering the acquisition of placement and technique, ballet terminology, and ballet as an art form.

DA310 Tap III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of tap dance technique. Students are introduced to syncopation and performance styles, and continue to build a strong tap dance vocabulary.

DA320 Jazz III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of jazz dance technique. Students are introduced to rhythmical phrasing and continue to build a strong jazz dance vocabulary.

DA330 Modern III (2 cr.)

This course provides an intermediate level of modern dance technique and vocabulary furthering the exploration of improvisation.

DA340 Ballet III (2 cr.)

An intermediate level of classical ballet, concentrating on extended vocabulary and the advancement of technique.

DA410 Tap IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of rhythm tap with a strong concentration on technique, syncopation and performance styles, including the exploration of improvisation and choreography.

DA420 Jazz IV (2 cr.)

An advanced level of jazz dance providing the continuation of strong techniques as well as developing artistry and performance qualities through the exploration of choreography.

DA430 Modern IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of modern dance technique with a strong concentration on improvisation, choreograph and artistry.

DA440 Ballet IV (2 cr.)

A fast intermediate level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique.

DA450 Ballet V (2 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study pointe technique.

DA455 Ballet VI (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique, while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

DA460 Ballet VII (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet providing the continuation of placement technique, while focusing on advanced artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

E. Five Rehearsal/Performance Labs

DA175 Rehearsal Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production.

DA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' dance production.

TA175 Rehearsal: Performance Lab (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

TA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

F. One semester of Voice Lessons

MUL208 Voice (1–0 cr.)

Applied Music (Private Instruction) Private lessons are available to students (regardless of major) with a strong commitment to practice and meet all of the obligations of their private instruction. Students who take private lessons are strongly encouraged to participate in ensembles whenever possible. Students must schedule a lesson time with their instructor by signing up for a weekly time by the third day of the term; students may forfeit their right to instruction if they delay in signing up for a lesson time. All applied lessons may be repeated and taken for credit. As part of their private study music majors are required to attend music department recitals and their choice of additional music performances as listed by the department each semester. See the annual Music Student Handbook for additional details. Music education and performance majors must register for one-hour lessons; non-music majors generally take half-hour lessons. Music majors and minors are required to take lessons for credit. In rare exceptions they are allowed to take a 0 credit semester of lessons with written approval from the department chair and a full 18 credit academic load. Music majors take 200 level MUL applied lessons their freshman and sophomore years, 400 level junior and senior years after successful completion of MU299 Sophomore Review. Music education and performance majors register for full-hour lessons (example: MUL201C or MUL401C) each semester. Music B.A. and music industry majors are encouraged to take full-hour lessons; half-hour lessons are the minimum requirement. Non-music majors wishing to take lessons for their own self-improvement and study register for 200 level lessons. Students performing in music ensembles frequently take applied lessons as an elective credit. There is an extra course fee for applied music lessons; please see course listing in WebTools for specific information. If students have any questions regarding lesson registration (MUL) they should contact the music department chair or applied instructor prior to registration or in the first two days of the semester.

MUL408 Voice (1–0 cr.)

Applied Music (Private Instruction) Private lessons are available to students (regardless of major) with a strong commitment to practice and meet all of the obligations of their private instruction. Students who take private lessons are strongly encouraged to participate in ensembles whenever possible. Students must schedule a lesson time with their instructor by signing up for a weekly time by the third day of the term; students may forfeit their right to instruction if they delay in signing up for a lesson time. All applied lessons may be repeated and taken for credit. As part of their private study music majors are required to attend music department recitals and their choice of additional music performances as listed by the department each semester. See the annual Music Student Handbook for additional details. Music education and performance majors must register for one-hour lessons; non-music majors generally take half-hour lessons. Music majors and minors are required to take lessons for credit. In rare exceptions they are allowed to take a 0 credit semester of lessons with written approval from the department chair and a full 18 credit academic load. Music majors take 200 level MUL applied lessons their freshman and sophomore years, 400 level junior and senior years after successful completion of MU299 Sophomore Review. Music education and performance majors register for full-hour lessons (example: MUL201C or MUL401C) each semester. Music B.A. and music industry majors are encouraged to take full-hour lessons; half-hour lessons are the minimum requirement. Non-music majors wishing to take lessons for their own self-improvement and study register for 200 level lessons. Students performing in music ensembles frequently take applied lessons as an elective credit. There is an extra course fee for applied music lessons; please see course listing in WebTools for specific information. If students have any questions regarding lesson registration (MUL) they should contact the music department chair or applied instructor prior to registration or in the first two days of the semester.

G. One semester of Musical Theatre Coaching

MUL209 Voice Coaching (1–0 cr.)

Applied Music (Private Instruction) Private lessons are available to students (regardless of major) with a strong commitment to practice and meet all of the obligations of their private instruction. Students who take private lessons are strongly encouraged to participate in ensembles whenever possible. Students must schedule a lesson time with their instructor by signing up for a weekly time by the third day of the term; students may forfeit their right to instruction if they delay in signing up for a lesson time. All applied lessons may be repeated and taken for credit. As part of their private study music majors are required to attend music department recitals and their choice of additional music performances as listed by the department each semester. See the annual Music Student Handbook for additional details. Music education and performance majors must register for one-hour lessons; non-music majors generally take half-hour lessons. Music majors and minors are required to take lessons for credit. In rare exceptions they are allowed to take a 0 credit semester of lessons with written approval from the department chair and a full 18 credit academic load. Music majors take 200 level MUL applied lessons their freshman and sophomore years, 400 level junior and senior years after successful completion of MU299 Sophomore Review. Music education and performance majors register for full-hour lessons (example: MUL201C or MUL401C) each semester. Music B.A. and music industry majors are encouraged to take full-hour lessons; half-hour lessons are the minimum requirement. Non-music majors wishing to take lessons for their own self-improvement and study register for 200 level lessons. Students performing in music ensembles frequently take applied lessons as an elective credit. There is an extra course fee for applied music lessons; please see course listing in WebTools for specific information. If students have any questions regarding lesson registration (MUL) they should contact the music department chair or applied instructor prior to registration or in the first two days of the semester.

MUL409 Voice Coaching (1–0 cr.)

Applied Music (Private Instruction) Private lessons are available to students (regardless of major) with a strong commitment to practice and meet all of the obligations of their private instruction. Students who take private lessons are strongly encouraged to participate in ensembles whenever possible. Students must schedule a lesson time with their instructor by signing up for a weekly time by the third day of the term; students may forfeit their right to instruction if they delay in signing up for a lesson time. All applied lessons may be repeated and taken for credit. As part of their private study music majors are required to attend music department recitals and their choice of additional music performances as listed by the department each semester. See the annual Music Student Handbook for additional details. Music education and performance majors must register for one-hour lessons; non-music majors generally take half-hour lessons. Music majors and minors are required to take lessons for credit. In rare exceptions they are allowed to take a 0 credit semester of lessons with written approval from the department chair and a full 18 credit academic load. Music majors take 200 level MUL applied lessons their freshman and sophomore years, 400 level junior and senior years after successful completion of MU299 Sophomore Review. Music education and performance majors register for full-hour lessons (example: MUL201C or MUL401C) each semester. Music B.A. and music industry majors are encouraged to take full-hour lessons; half-hour lessons are the minimum requirement. Non-music majors wishing to take lessons for their own self-improvement and study register for 200 level lessons. Students performing in music ensembles frequently take applied lessons as an elective credit. There is an extra course fee for applied music lessons; please see course listing in WebTools for specific information. If students have any questions regarding lesson registration (MUL) they should contact the music department chair or applied instructor prior to registration or in the first two days of the semester.

H. One of the following:

MU130 Music Fundamentals I (1 cr.)

This course is designed to be an introduction to music reading and understanding. The fundamentals of pitch and rhythm are covered along with ear training and score reading in this computer-assisted course.

MU131 Music Fundamentals II (1 cr.)

This is a continuation of Music Fundamentals I.

MU160 Music Theory I (3 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in increasing their knowledge of the basic elements of music. Concepts covered include: keys, scales, simple and compound rhythms, intervals, triads, 7th chords, principles of voice leading, harmonic progression, cadences, phrases and periods.

MU170 Ear Training I (2 cr.)

The objective of this course is to develop aural skills involving melody, rhythm and harmony. Concepts covered include: identification of intervals, scales, triads, sight-singing and one voice melodic and rhythmic dictations.

MU171 Piano Class (3 cr.)

This course provides a basic introduction to music and the keyboard. Students learn to read music in treble and bass clefs, become familiar with basic music vocabulary and symbols, and develop keyboard skills. Students also study the history of piano music and piano playing in order to deepen their understanding of the instrument. This course is open to all students with an interest in music, and fulfills the general education aesthetics content area course requirement.

A. Theatre core requirements:

(33 credits)

TA100 Script Analysis and Dramatic Literature (3 cr.)

Through the examination of a variety of plays from different eras and aesthetics, students learn methodologies from Aristotle to modern performance theory in order to critically and theoretically analyze a script for potential production. This course includes an introduction to theatre research and writing methods, and serves as a foundation for other major courses in theatre.

TA105 Stage Craft and Lab (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the basic techniques commonly used in theatre production. This course is the prerequisite for all theatre design courses. The course focuses on simultaneous development of crafts found in scenery, lighting, and costumes. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Theatre and Arts Major & Minor requirement and the prerequisite for design courses.

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA155 Acting I: Introduction (3 cr.)

The basic tasks of the actor are considered in three distinct units: voice and movement; creativity and imagination; and, character and scene development. The course serves as an introduction to theatrical performance, and provides a knowledge and appreciation of theatre as a process of fostering creative expression.

TA240 Directing I (3 cr.)

This course considers the elemental concerns for the director including movement, composition, and a review of script analysis techniques. Students practice techniques in short classroom scenes and through guided practice in directing scenes to be presented for an audience.

TA299 Career Development I: Sophomore Review (0 cr.)

Students are introduced to developing necessary materials and documentation for the academic and professional theatre portfolio. Topics include resumes, headshots, monologues, songs, design/tech portfolios, and the e-portfolio for their area of focus. Emphasis is placed on readying materials for the departmental sophomore review including writing the narrative statement of career goals, as well as preparing applications for summer theatre work.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages as well as European Renaissance and Baroque.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries with an emphasis on Romanticism and Opera, European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA360 London Page to the Stage (3 cr.)

This course explores the transfer of dramatic literature from the page to the stage. Prior to attending a London production, students analyze and interpret a given text and discuss its possible production requirements. After viewing the production students assess it based on their pre-production analysis and interpretation.

TA425 Career Development II: Senior Capstone (1 cr.)

This course helps students develop documents and materials relative to auditioning and interviewing for theatre related employment. Topics include resumes, head shots, monologues/songs, cold readings, design/tech portfolios, cover letters, call boards, graduate school/additional training, audition/interview protocol, talent and casting agencies, film-TV-industrials, unions and organizations, living in a large city, and more.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in modern theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

B. Students must complete a minimum of 3 credits in design/technical theatre from:

TA270 Scene Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical set designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice traditional sketching, painting, drafting, model-making and practical scenery construction methods. Study concentrates on process-orientated activity – developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, spatial and production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA275 Lighting Design (3 cr.)

This course explores the essential crafts of the theatrical lighting designer. In a hands-on approach, students practice drafting, hanging, circuiting, focusing, and cueing for lights. Study concentrates on the process: developing one's personal vision and interpretive skills through script analysis, research techniques, basic theory, production considerations and communication of ideas.

TA280 Costume Design (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the history of clothing for the stage. Particular emphasis is placed on the costume design process from script to rendering, conceptual thought and communication, and techniques in the planning and building of a show.

C. The following courses:

TA111 Tech Lab I (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken at the same time at TA105 Stage Craft or during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor

TA311 Tech Lab II (1 cr.)

Tech Lab is an experiential-based course open to all students. In shop settings, the focus will be on behind the scenes production of theatre. Through individual production assignments students will learn the duties and requirements of theatre production, develop skill in the tools and techniques of production. This course may be repeated up to three times and may not be taken twice in the same semester, and cannot be taken during the London semester.  The course requires 45 hours of lab per semester in at least two-hour blocks, scheduled with the instructor.

D. One Dance Technique Class

DA110 Tap I (0 or 2 cr.)

This course introduces a dance style not only seen but heard as the rhythmic structure unfolds. It is designed to explore the rudiments of tap dance techniques as an entertaining form of dance. No dance experience necessary.

DA120 Jazz I (0 or 2 cr.)

This introduction to the stylization of Jazz dance emphasizes the basic technical work of isolations and an overview of the development of jazz dance from its origin. No dance experience necessary.

DA130 Modern I (0 or 2 cr.)

This is an introductory course in modern dance technique. Students learn a blend of techniques including fall and recovery, and contraction and release. No dance experience necessary.

DA140 Ballet I (0 or 2 cr.)

This is a beginning course offering the basic theory and practice of classical ballet and ballet terminology, emphasizing the use of placement. No dance experience necessary.

DA210 Tap II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build student's knowledge of tap terminology and offers an intermediate level of tap technique.

DA220 Jazz II (2 cr.)

This course continues to work toward building the vocabulary of jazz technique, isolations, and extended rhythmical phrasing.

DA230 Modern II (2 cr.)

This course continues to build students' modern dance technique. Students are introduced to the principles of improvisation, blend of techniques including fall and recovery, and contraction and release.

DA240 Ballet II (2 cr.)

The course builds the beginning ballet vocabulary, furthering the acquisition of placement and technique, ballet terminology, and ballet as an art form.

DA310 Tap III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of tap dance technique. Students are introduced to syncopation and performance styles, and continue to build a strong tap dance vocabulary.

DA320 Jazz III (2 cr.)

This course offers an intermediate level of jazz dance technique. Students are introduced to rhythmical phrasing and continue to build a strong jazz dance vocabulary.

DA330 Modern III (2 cr.)

This course provides an intermediate level of modern dance technique and vocabulary furthering the exploration of improvisation.

DA340 Ballet III (2 cr.)

An intermediate level of classical ballet, concentrating on extended vocabulary and the advancement of technique.

DA410 Tap IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of rhythm tap with a strong concentration on technique, syncopation and performance styles, including the exploration of improvisation and choreography.

DA420 Jazz IV (2 cr.)

An advanced level of jazz dance providing the continuation of strong techniques as well as developing artistry and performance qualities through the exploration of choreography.

DA430 Modern IV (2 cr.)

This course provides an advanced level of modern dance technique with a strong concentration on improvisation, choreograph and artistry.

DA440 Ballet IV (2 cr.)

A fast intermediate level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique.

DA450 Ballet V (2 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study pointe technique.

DA455 Ballet VI (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet, providing the continuation of placement and technique, while focusing on artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

DA460 Ballet VII (3 cr.)

An advanced level of classical ballet providing the continuation of placement technique, while focusing on advanced artistry. This course includes the opportunity to study advanced pointe technique.

E. Three Rehearsal/Performance Labs:

DA175 Rehearsal Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production.

DA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through dance production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' dance production.

TA175 Rehearsal: Performance Lab (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

TA375 Rehearsal: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to apply learned techniques and theories to a particular role onstage. Students will further develop and apply their play analysis skills, performance theory and practice skills and techniques, as well as critical thinking and self-disciplinary skills through theatrical production. Advisors will help monitor registration in the upper and lower divisions based on leadership roles within a given production. Registration for this course is mandatory for all students cast in a 'main-stage' theatre production.

F. Three Crew/Performance Labs

TA185 Crew: Performance Lab I (0-1 cr.)

This course is an experiential-based course open to all students interested in a guided study of various theatrical arts in the context of a production atmosphere. In the production setting, the focus is on running all back stage elements of a show from technical rehearsals through closing performance and strike. Through individual running crew assignments, students will learn what the duties and requirements are to mounting a theatre production, and running it during performances. Can be taken up to six times for credit. May not be taken more than twice in a semester.

TA385 Crew: Performance Lab II (0-1 cr.)

This course is an experiential-based course open to all students interested in a guided study of various theatrical arts in the context of a production atmosphere. In the production setting, the focus is on leadership roles in running all back stage elements of a show from technical rehearsals through closing performance and strike. Through leadership crew assignments, students will facilitate mounting a theatre production and running it during performances. May be taken up to six times for credit. May not be repeated more than twice in a semester.

G. 12 additional credits

12 additional credits of elective credits at 300 level or higher as approved by the department chair from:

TA302 Modern Movies (3 cr.)

An introductory study of important contemporary films for students who wish to learn how to understand and evaluate popular cinema. Students are introduced to the history of film-making as well as basic film techniques. Movies are screened, discussed and evaluated in terms of content, style and intent. Students have the opportunity to react and formulate their own aesthetic preferences through a series of written and oral responses to the films. This course satisfies an Aesthetic general education requirement.

TA330 Dublin Theatre Workshop (0-1 cr.)

This two-week course is typically offered as an extension of the London semester. The two-week workshop at the Gaiety School of Acting is intended to give students an intensive experience in the acting, technical, or administrative areas of theatre. Participants study Irish theatre literature and hone their skills. Attending performances and visiting significant cultural sites also includes a weekend in Galway.

TA340 Directing II (3 cr.)

Consideration of more complex directorial issues, including advanced actor coaching, working with production managers, achieving style and unity, and dramatic criticism. Students direct scenes for thrust and arena stages. The course is also designed to hone communication skills necessary for effective collaboration in the director/designer relationship such as how to develop, create, and research a concept and vision. Directing of classroom scenes is required as well as the directing of a one-act play to be performed for an audience.

TA342 Assistant Scenic Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, engineering/drafting, tech week, and fabrication, as needed.

TA343 Assistant Costume Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, rendering, tech week, and construction, as needed.

TA345 Assistant Lighting Design (1 cr.)

The Assistant Designer will work closely with a faculty designer on a specific departmental production. The student will co-design a show with a faculty designer including research, budgeting, plotting, tech week, and hang and focus, as needed.

TA346-349 Special Topics in Theatre (1-3 cr.)

Courses dealing with specialized topics, including those relevant to the actor, director, designers, or other theatre practitioners.

TA350 Playwriting Workshop (3 cr.)

This course consists of building blocks for those interested in pursuing playwriting. Techniques for character development, conflict, dialogue, and dramatic action will be explored through specific writing assignments. The culminating work is a short one-act play written by students.

TA357 Musical Theatre II: Workshop (3 cr.)

The workshop serves as a production caldron. Tailored to the specific needs of the students in the class, the workshop concentrates on the journey from script and score to public performance. The class will be run in the context of a rehearsal in that the elements of historical context, analysis, music, staging, choreography, and character work will combine to create the musical performance. The semester will culminate in a showcase of individual, vocal ensemble, and musical scene performances.

TA358 Acting III: London (3 cr.)

The course is taught during the London semester. It examines the British approach to scene work and the rehearsal process. Time is spent in working with the Standard British RP dialect. Students work with scenes written by British playwrights such as Shakespeare, Noel Coward, Tom Stoppard, and Harold Pinter.

TA450 Arts Administration: Theory and Practice (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of arts administration as it applies to the performing arts, visual arts, and arts services organizations. Topics explored include management models, marketing, development, finances and facilities management and planning. Students apply knowledge in these areas to an arts organization which they create in class. The course culminates with the students presenting their projects in executive session.

TA470 Acting IV: Styles (3 cr.)

This course provides for the study of various acting styles found in the genres of realism, comedy, and tragedy. Periods of study include Elizabethan, Restoration, French Neoclassic, Victorian, and/or Early American. Work is focused on researching the background and demands of each period and style and to include this work in more intense scene and monologue work.

TA496/497 Internship in Theatre (1–17 cr.)

Internships are available to qualified students in theatre at cooperating professional and educational institutions.

TA499 Graduation Project (1-3 cr.)

Theatre majors may complete a graduation project, which may be of either a creative or a research nature. The topic must be approved by the department faculty before the project is undertaken. In every case, there must be a written component which describes and evaluates the process. Normally, the project is presented to the department faculty and staff for a formal oral evaluation.