News from Nairobi

News from Nairobi

By James Chege Librarian, Maryknoll Institute of African Studies MIASMU hosts visitors with one-day course The Maryknoll Institute of African Studies hosted a group from the Maryknoll Mission Education and Promotion, Western region of the U.S. for a one-day course. The course took place on Saturday, Feb. 8, and was focused on African spirituality. The group was taught by Laurenti Magesa, an associate professor of Saint Mary’s and a faculty member of  MIASMU since it began in 1989.  Magesa is a distinguished professor in moral theology and African spirituality, and is the author of several books with his latest title “What is Not Sacred?: African spirituality” published by Orbis Books. The group is based in the San Francisco Bay area and was on a two-week trip to Kenya and neighboring Tanzania visiting Maryknoll programs. One of the participants is the retired bishop of Reno/Las Vega. The one-day course was aimed to equip them with some foundational cultural skills needed to process their experiences in Africa. The general feedback from the participants was that it was a very enlightening experience. They seemed to take a particular liking to the field study which they carried out in the afternoon, each with a personal field assistant. A Kenyan University graduate said that it was the best kind of orientation anyone would have hoped for as they started their two week...
Visit the Rochester Center for open house on March 13

Visit the Rochester Center for open house on March 13

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota will host an Open House from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 13 at its Rochester Center. All are invited to attend the event but especially individuals who are interested in pursuing bachelor’s or advanced degrees offered in Rochester. One new program that will be introduced at this location is the B.S. in Police Science, a long-standing program at other locations that has graduated many Saint Mary’s University alumni who are serving as leaders in law enforcement, private safety, or similar careers. “We have programs for anyone looking to further their education — regardless of what level,” said Laurie Roy, director of the Rochester Center for Saint Mary’s. “Many people do not realize the opportunities that are available to them right here in Rochester.” Programs currently offered at the Rochester Center include: Undergraduate Certificate in Accounting B.S. in Accounting B.S. in Business Administration B.S. in Human Resource Management B.S. in Police Science (new) B.S. in Psychology M.A. in Counseling and Psychological Services M.A. in Educational Leadership M.A. in Health and Human Services Administration M.A. in Human Development M.A. in Literacy Education M.A. in Management Master of Business Administration (MBA) M.Ed. in Teaching and Learning M.S. in Project Management Graduate Certificate in English as a Second Language Graduate Certificate: K-12 Reading Teacher Graduate Certificate in Project Management Ed.S. in Educational Administration (Director of Special Education, K-12 Principal, Superintendent) Ed.D. in Leadership Located in the Heintz Center, 1926 Collegeview Dr. S.E., the Rochester Center was established in 1985. A partnership between Saint Mary’s and Rochester Community and Technical College enables simple...
News from Nairobi

News from Nairobi

By James Chege Librarian, Maryknoll Institute of African Studies MIAS three-week immersion course final day activities Jan. 29 marked the end of a three-week immersion course at the Maryknoll Institute of African Studies. The program featured the course “African Culture: An Overview,” taught by Dr. Michael Katola, as well as field research workshops given by Dr. Edith Chamwama. The course focused on the basic aspects of African cultural knowledge in general and is one of the prerequisite courses for the master’s degree in African Studies. As part of the final day celebrations, the class was treated to lunch as they shared their various experiences in the field and in the classroom. The special three-week immersion course was not on the regular academic calendar at MIAS but was organized after a special request from a Franciscan missionary community. The Franciscans opened a mission in the Archdiocese of Juba, Southern Sudan last year where they work in pastoral activities. They are also engaged in sharing Catholic social teaching, and peace building and reconciliation activities. To adequately perform these tasks they recognized a need for a deeper understanding of African culture, hence the program. Two students from this Special Immersion course have enrolled full-time in the 12-week second-semester program after getting a taste of the MIAS method of learning, which combines field-research and lectures, and with it an appetite to learn more about African culture as well as their own cultures.     One-week justice and peace workshop kicks off The month of February at the Maryknoll Institute of African Studies began on a busy note with a one-week justice and peace...
Education summit participants discuss adapting to the digital age

Education summit participants discuss adapting to the digital age

Educators, students and parents flocked to the Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus to join in on the second Missing Voices: Equity in Education Summit on Feb. 6. CAPTION: Two educators discuss their reflections from the day’s speakers in their dialogue groups. Held at the University Center, over 300 participants listened, learned and interacted throughout a day that was packed with speakers, art, dance and conversation. Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings — the Kellner Family Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison — kicked things off with an engaging keynote address. Ladson-Billings, who is known for her innovative work in the field of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy, framed her conversation on the educational debt that is directly connected to history, economics and social politics. She went on to detail how to connect with students in spaces where they already excel, like hip-hop music and technology. Hip-hop, she noted, is a form of resistance in artistic expression that dates back decades. Certain current-generation hip-hop artists, Ladson-Billings explained, are using technology to maximize their message of social justice — and young people are responding in numbers. She used the example of Jasiri X, a lyricist whose politically conscious music videos (most notably his piece on the Arab Spring, which Ladson-Billings showed to the audience) circulated social media like wildfire, sparking inspiration in youth worldwide. This example highlighted the collective power of hip hop and technology while addressing how hip hop can be used as a tool for critical thinking and creative resistance. “For them, email is an old technology. Teachers, write that down,”...
Alumnus and adjunct professor publishes police counseling book

Alumnus and adjunct professor publishes police counseling book

MINNEAPOLIS — Dennis Conroy, an alumnus of Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota, recently published a new book he co-authored with Christine Hess Orthmann, titled Surviving a Law Enforcement Career: A Guide for Cops and Those Who Love Them (2014). Conroy, a 40-year law enforcement officer and a licensed psychologist, received a master’s degree from Saint Mary’s in 1982 and is an associate professor at his alma mater. Intended as a guide for police officers and their families, Surviving a Law Enforcement Career addresses the decision to enter law enforcement, the initiation into the career, the life in a police family, the day-to-day stresses, and more. Having served the Saint Paul Police Department for numerous years in several roles and as a counselor for officers, Conroy is familiar with the risks inherent to the occupation. “This book is for cops, anybody who’s thinking about being a cop, and family members of cops so that they understand,” Conroy said. “One of the sections in the book is about what it’s like to grow up in a police family. I think anybody who wants to work with cops, as a clinician, really needs to understand that culture because it’s so much a part of who they are.” The book has already received praise. Minneapolis Police Chief and Saint Mary’s alumna Janeé Harteau ’03, M’06 says the book “provides valuable insight into the emotional stress and trauma that police officers experience.” Conroy will be the featured presenter at an upcoming event for police officers, titled “The Traumas of Law Enforcement,” on Feb. 24-26 at Saint Mary’s Twin Cities Campus at 2500 Park Ave.,...
Former president and four other Lasallian leaders honored

Former president and four other Lasallian leaders honored

MINNEAPOLIS — Thirty years after Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota established its presence in Minneapolis, the university dedicated Brother Louis Hall on Feb. 13 to honor the president who pioneered the school’s rise to the forefront of adult education in Minnesota. The university also recognized five presidents who have contributed more than 125 years of service to higher education. Brother Louis Hall, located at 2304 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, was named for Brother Louis DeThomasis, FSC, president of Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota from 1984 to 2005. Brother Louis’ legacy will live on in the three-level building that bears his name and houses several classrooms and offices. The building was purchased by the university in 2006 to expand its graduate school and professional programs. “This university will never forget what you did here, what you made possible,” Brother William Mann, FSC, current president, said to Brother Louis during his remarks at the special ceremony in Minneapolis. “We have about 40,000 graduates of Saint Mary’s University and 20,000 of whom came through the (adult) programs in the last 20 years. That is an unbelievable legacy.” Serving as the 11th president of Saint Mary’s University, Brother Louis was an innovator in the area of education and he’s lauded for expanding the graduate education offerings in the Twin Cities and beyond. Saint Mary’s is now one of the largest graduate schools in the state with enrollment at 4,300 and also offer several fully online programs. Brother Louis is also credited with leading many other innovations at Saint Mary’s during his two-decade tenure. In addition to the building dedication, Brother Louis and four other...
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