Visit us during Minnesota Private College Week, June 23-27

Visit us during Minnesota Private College Week, June 23-27

Attention, high school students and your family and friends. Have you started looking at colleges yet? Have you already visited at least 15 campuses? No matter what stage of looking for a college you are at right now, Minnesota Private College Week, June 23-27, is the perfect time to visit Saint Mary’s. College visits are a great way to get first-hand experience of the campus, not only to see what the buildings look like, but also to get a feel for what it will be like walking to your classes, the field-house, the theatre, or the library, having lunch on campus, or hanging out on the plaza with friends, etc. It’s also the perfect opportunity to talk to students, faculty and staff and ask questions about our areas of study, financial aid packages, study abroad programs, and more. Sessions will be held twice daily on 17 campuses statewide, running from 9:30 to 11:45 a.m. and from 2:00 to 4:15 p.m. Register for your visit on the Minnesota Private College Week website. Read what other students said about visiting colleges during Minnesota Private College Week. If you can’t make it during that week, we invite you to attend any of our other upcoming events or you can make arrangements for an individual visit. Visit our Office of Admission webpage for more details....
New accountancy master’s available online or on campus

New accountancy master’s available online or on campus

As the demand for an advanced degree in accountancy has increased, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota has announced the addition of a Master’s of Science in Accountancy program. Available both in Minneapolis and online beginning this fall, the M.S. in Accountancy prepares students for advancement into a management position in nearly any accounting setting. Another benefit of the program is that graduates will meet the 150-credit hour requirement for the Certified Public Accountant exam and/or the Certified Management Accountant certification. “The Master of Science in Accountancy at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota is designed to transform accounting practitioners to key ethical thought leaders in quantitative decision making,” says Matt Nowakowski, Dean of the Graduate School of Business and Technology. “The effective communication of fiscal data and analysis is a key competency for business partners, and this program aspires to be a premier contributor and partner in the education of future accounting leaders.” This master’s program — designed with input from certified accountants — provides a logical next step for accountants looking for an affordable, accessible and quality way to advance their career. “The bachelor’s program [in accounting] gives students the very technical skills that they need to be an accountant — the principles and the concepts,” said Saint Mary’s program director Melanie Torborg. “The master’s program really refines those skills and brings them to the next level. We assume that students coming into this program know the principles and the concepts, but now they want to use those to become business partners and help companies make decisions.” The online delivery method for this program includes an iPad with productivity...
Dr. Ting Ni retires from Saint Mary’s

Dr. Ting Ni retires from Saint Mary’s

Dr. Ting Ni’s remarkable story has inspired countless students throughout her tenure. (And it’s even suppressed a bit of whining by students who could otherwise be tempted to take their education for granted.) Ni, a native of Tianjin, China, grew up during the tumultuous Cultural Revolution. For 10 years, between 1966 and 1976, schools were closed in China under Mao Zedong’s orders. And at 16, Ni was sent to a village to be “re-educated” by peasant labor. She was told she would spend the rest of her life working in this village. She spent long days doing hard labor in the fields. “Peasants would work from dawn until it was dark when you couldn’t see anymore,” she said. But in the evening, she taught herself English by listening to a radio, thirsty for knowledge. Prior to the Cultural Revolution, both of Ni’s parents were educators, and she grew up on a college campus surrounded by an academic environment. “Teaching was always something I wanted to do, even when I was really young,” she said. “My first dream was to go to college. The Cultural Revolution interrupted my dream, but that dream didn’t die.” Her parents, labeled as counter-revolutionaries, were punished. Her father was sent to what Ni compares to a concentration camp, and her brother was sent to work in a dangerous coal mine thousands of miles away. Yet her mother would send her used books, which were hard to come by as libraries were closed, and many books had been destroyed. During this period, Ni heard about a national exam — administered by the government — that the...
Graduates see bright future

Graduates see bright future

Earning a college degree is never easy, but the reward is lifelong. The student speakers at the Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota Schools of Graduate and Professional Programs Commencement Ceremony on June 1 would attest to that. PHOTO: Braulio Carrasco M’14 stops and poses for a “selfie” photo with program director Susan Moore before receiving his diploma. Prior to their fellow graduates walking across the stage at the Saint Mary’s University Center and receiving their diplomas, several students provided reflections. The speakers told stories of various bumps in the road and moments of doubt along the way toward earning the degree that they wanted. “A little bit less than two years ago, I started my journey at Saint Mary’s,” said Yue Xu M’14, a native of China who received her M.A. in Health and Human Services Administration on Sunday. “I faced a lot of differences between the traditional Chinese education style and the western education style. I remember that I did not know what a syllabus was, and I did not bring it to my first class. “I also remember asking myself a lot of questions, like what did I get myself into? Am I prepared enough to start a master’s program in an English-speaking country? Should I drop it right away? And to be honest, a lot more thoughts passed. Then I remembered to ask myself one last question: how much do I want a master’s degree? The answer to that question helped me make my decision to continue my studies at Saint Mary’s.” Besides cultural and language barriers, Xu also had to focus on two family emergencies...
Aspiring police officer spent semester with Interpol

Aspiring police officer spent semester with Interpol

Junior Colin Hennessy’s desire to help people started in grade school. Back then, he would play pretend fireman, chasing his dog with a water hose and spraying water into the open windows of his house. His parents put a kink in the hose. “Needless to say, my firefighting days ended as abruptly as they started after my parents found out the kitchen and living room were soaking wet and the dog was hiding in house,” Hennessy said. Little did the Hennessys know that childhood pretending would eventually lead their son to an internship with INTERPOL in Washington, D.C., and aspirations to become a police officer battling narcotics. Hennessy, a criminal justice and law enforcement major from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is one of two students spending spring semester interning in Washington, through a partnership with the Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars. When Hennessy applied for the internship, he wasn’t sure where he would be working. “About a month before I was set to leave for D.C., I received an e-mail that INTERPOL had looked over my information and wanted to offer me a position. I was so excited about this opportunity and it was difficult to contain myself,” he said. “I had just gotten offered a position with a very prestigious federal investigations agency that assists law enforcement activities worldwide!” Hennessy knows that getting experience with investigations is vital to his career. “Policing is about much more than just finding the bad guy and putting him or her behind bars,” he said. “Investigations are the major lifeblood of law enforcement agencies around the world. This is also a...
Reunion Weekend 2014, June 20-22

Reunion Weekend 2014, June 20-22

So many reasons to come back to campus for Reunion Weekend, June 20-22! Last year’s All-School Reunion and Centennial Weekend drew 1,000 people to campus for celebrating and reminiscing. In keeping with the momentum, this year’s Reunion Weekend events are designed to highlight anniversary years (those ending in 4 and 9), but alumni who connect with anniversary years are also invited. Teammates and classmates from surrounding graduation years can join the fun. A bevy of activities are slated, some for outdoor adventurers, music lovers, party seekers, and even those looking to kick back and relax. Enjoy the natural beauty that surrounds the Winona campus during bluff tours (via golf carts) or by participating in the Gilmore Gallop Walk/Run that winds through the lush wooded trails. Get out on the river with Brother John Grover FSC ’65, on canoes or get out on the greens during the annual golf outing at Bridges Golf Club. The annual picnic at Saint Mary’s Park — complete with inflatables for the kids — has become an annual tradition as weekend participants gather in the shadow of Saint Mary’s most historic buildings. Take a tour of Winona hotspots via trolley. Head back to the College of Saint Teresa for lunch and a tour. Or spend some time perusing yearbooks in our hospitality room. Enjoy some musical blasts from the past during the piano sing-along. This is your time to “go back in time” and stir up old memories. Or spend some time “in the now.” See how the Winona campus has changed and talk with current students and faculty. The “Celebration of Scholarship” will include...