Graduate program in Philanthropy and Development celebrates 25th anniversary

Graduate program in Philanthropy and Development celebrates 25th anniversary

Photo caption: Guest Speaker Adrian Sargeant, director of the Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy at Plymouth University, England, and the world’s foremost expert on the research in fundraising, addressed guests celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Saint Mary’s University M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program.   WINONA, Minn. — Fundraising professionals from England, Canada, and from across the United States discovered Saturday that the path to successful philanthropic efforts is universal. Alumni, students, and staff from Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota’s M.A. in Philanthropy and Development program gathered Saturday in celebration of the program’s 25th anniversary. Guest speaker Adrian Sargeant, the world’s foremost expert on the research in fundraising, addressed how and under what circumstances organizations develop exceptional fundraising. Sargeant is consistently voted one of the top 10 most influential people in the field by readers of Professional Fundraising Magazine and currently serves as the director of the Centre for Sustainable Philanthropy at Plymouth University, England. The Philanthropy and Development program, which welcomes students from across North America and beyond, features a concentrated schedule of summer classes combined with online study. Participants are fundraising professionals from some of the country’s most prestigious for-profit and non-profit organizations. Participants enhance their development and organizational skills within a classroom of like-minded professionals, facilitated by faculty who are top practitioners and leading consultants. Current student Cathy Mann runs a consulting firm, Cathy Mann & Associates Inc., out of Toronto. She was drawn to the program through word of mouth and has particularly enjoyed networking with instructors and others professionals in her cohort. “I’m thankful for what the program has given me; it has helped...
Study abroad experience leads to graduate school in Australia

Study abroad experience leads to graduate school in Australia

Ever since Shauna Stephens ’14 adopted her first baby toad, she was predestined for a career in biology. Now a graduate student in Australia, she is more apt to study the native environment of koalas or track the seasonal migration of wallabies. The Norwood, Minn., native said, “As a kid I was always curious as to how things worked, why things changed, and what little critters I could catch in nature. I distinctly remember as a young child I was convinced I saved a baby toad from being hit by a car. I took that animal home with me and studied its behavior, observed how it adapted to my room, and what habitat requirements it needed. From then on I have never strayed from studying the life sciences.” Her senior year at Saint Mary’s, Stephens spent spring semester in Melbourne, Australia, through the Lasallian International Programs Consortium. She was able to take courses that complemented her studies at Saint Mary’s, like paleobiology, geographic information systems, and plant biology. “Class field trips were included for these units,” she said. “The most memorable might be visiting the Mangrove salt marsh where we examined plant population and distribution, along with species diversity. And, I found fish and a crab to play with.” The study abroad experience opened her eyes to new areas of study. Originally set on becoming a veterinarian, the biology major has also discovered a passion for research. “I love using my microscope and examining anything from tiny aquatic organisms to a fungus growing on a dying plant,” she said. She loved the Australian experience so much, she decided to...
Ron Hustvedt M’01 awarded national honor

Ron Hustvedt M’01 awarded national honor

Ron Hustvedt, a 2001 graduate of the Saint Mary’s University Master of Education in Teaching and Learning program, was named the 2014 National Magnet School Teacher of the Year. The award was announced during the Magnet Schools of America’s 32nd National Conference in Hartford, Connecticut in May. Now in his sixth year as a social studies teacher at Salk Middle School in Elk River, Minn., Hustvedt helped advance the transition into a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) magnet school by adapting the philosophy into his classroom, keeping diverse subjects and students in mind. “We’ve collaborated a lot at Salk to help fit STEM into everything that we do,” Hustvedt said. “We help make connections to the students in all subject areas, not just the STEM subject areas. Everything that’s taught in school is interconnected and can be linked together with STEM as the glue. The challenge is in creating opportunities and mechanisms to support all students, no matter where they’re at with their learning skills.” Eight years after Salk decided to become a STEM magnet school, the results are rolling in. The first groups of students who started the STEM program are in college or just graduating from high school. Many have received scholarships, some are national merit scholars and a couple have even earned perfect ACT scores. “Most of all, the students who were in our STEM program for their middle school experience are reporting back that they used the skills and knowledge acquired here throughout high school and into college,” Hustvedt said. The school has established History Day and Science Fair as two of their hallmark...
Degree helps alum land fire chief post

Degree helps alum land fire chief post

Tim Butler M’08 didn’t think that graduate school was for him. After all, it had been 25 years since he had earned his bachelor’s degree, and he had a fine job as Emergency Control Chief for the Saint Paul Fire Department. But he soon realized that if he was going to advance in the fire department, he was going to need a master’s degree. So with the recommendation of his colleagues, Butler enrolled at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota to pursue a master’s degree in Public Safety Administration in 2006. In 2007, Butler was appointed Fire Chief of the Saint Paul Fire Department. In January 2009, he spoke at Saint Mary’s Schools of Graduate and Professional Programs’ commencement ceremony with his master’s degree in hand. “I told people at the graduation ceremony that I felt like the old dog who could learn new tricks,” Butler said. “My academic mind was still there from 20 years ago, and this was like opening up the shutters and getting fresh sunlight. It was like going into a dusty attic. Without that program, I know I would not have gotten the job.” The last time Butler was in school before studying at Saint Mary’s was at the Coast Guard Academy in the early 1980s, where he studied marine science. After serving in the military, he joined the Saint Paul Fire Department in 1990 as the Fire Communication Chief and was eventually transferred back and forth between the Police and Fire Departments as the Emergency Management Chief. “My career was going wherever it led me rather than me planning where I wanted it to...
Saint Mary’s students present at the Capitol

Saint Mary’s students present at the Capitol

Previously published in Campus Notes By Deb Nahrgang Five students headed to the Minnesota State Capitol Rotunda on Tuesday, April 8, to present the results of their independent research and creative scholarship at the annual Minnesota Private College Scholars at the Capitol event. The Minnesota Private College Council hosts this event to publicize and celebrate the achievements of just a few of the thousands of students who attend 15 private schools of higher learning in Minnesota, and to share research that may have long-term implications for Minnesotans. This event showcased current research projects completed by more than 40 undergraduate scholars from Minnesota private colleges and universities. Saint Mary’s students attending this year’s event included: • Amy Spitzmueller — “Heavy Metal Analysis of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochius) from East Lake Winona” • Ryan Diak, Amanda Lindholm, Danielle Pues and Rim Woldeslassie — “From Cradle to Grave: Does Mortality Salience Facilitate a Preference for Our Own Attachment...
Featured Graduate: Denise Moy ’13

Featured Graduate: Denise Moy ’13

Plenty of people take time off between high school and college. Not everyone takes 36 years off like Denise Moy did. But here she is, several decades later and a Saint Mary’s University graduate, working in her field of choice with a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Services. “Saint Mary’s kept telling me that I belonged in this field and would make a great human services worker,” Moy said. “I am so thankful to all of those people for helping me make it through.” After graduating from Simley High School in 1973, Moy didn’t have the confidence to continue her education. She was an average student, and her counselors and parents didn’t think she would be able to keep up with college academics. So she entered the workforce and served as a secretary for several different companies. Moving from job to job, Moy was laid off in 2005 when her job was relocated overseas. She tried to find work, but every administrative assistant job opening required at least an associate’s degree. So, even with more than 30 years of experience in the field, she was only able to arrange three interviews in one year. With her husband’s support and encouragement, Moy returned to school full-time and enrolled at Dakota County Technical College (DCTC). While taking courses at DCTC’s Partners in Higher Learning Center in Apple Valley, Moy became acquainted with Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota through its Apple Valley center and coordinator Cheryl Cox (then in the same building). The two began talking about Moy continuing her education in human services at Saint Mary’s. But Moy’s lack of...