Earn your masters in education.

Advance Your Career in Education

Enroll in the Master of Arts in Education—Minnesota program at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota and you’ll learn from top-notch educators who have a wealth of classroom experience to share. 

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Choose Your Specialty

This Saint Mary’s M.A. in Education program is designed for educators who want to advance their careers and build their skills in one of three areas of specialty: curriculum and instruction, culturally responsive teaching, or a content specialization in English or Math (CES18). Successful completion of the program will increase your professional competencies and make you more marketable as you advance your career in education.

While Saint Mary’s M.A. in Education program is intended to provide teachers with in-depth knowledge in a particular area of specialty, all students will be challenged through the core curriculum to do the following:

  • Better integrate technology in your classroom to enhance your teaching
  • Make practical changes to your classroom instruction to align with current educational theory
  • Apply modern knowledge in child growth and development to improve your classroom instruction
     

Through these specially designed courses, you’ll hone your teaching skills to create a more engaging learning environment. Receive guidance on developing curriculum and instruction methods that promote increased achievement while learning to implement corresponding assessments that more accurately monitor student performance.

In addition to the intentional focus this area of specialty places on curriculum and instruction, you will also learn techniques to further develop your communication skills to improve collaboration, resolve conflicts, and make it easier to connect with multiple stakeholders.

Through these specially designed courses, you’ll develop skills to improve students’ classroom experiences inclusive of all cultural backgrounds. Throughout your learning, you’ll be encouraged to consider multiple racial and cultural perspectives as you develop a culturally responsive teaching approach.

Our CES 18 in English is designed to give teachers the necessary credits to teach college within the schools, while also offering the opportunity to continue towards your master’s degree in education. Our English coursework is designed to enhance your understanding of how language, critical perspective, and cultural situation impact the composition and analysis of texts. All coursework is offered fully online. With our program you may choose to:

  • complete some or all of the 18 credits you need in order to satisfy requirements to teach college-level coursework 
  • complete an additional 18 credits to earn a Master of Arts in Education with English Specialization

Learn more about the Concurrent Enrollment in Schools (CES) 18 courses, requirements, and application process.

Our CES 18 in Math is designed to give teachers the necessary credits to teach college within the schools, while also offering the opportunity to continue towards your master’s degree in education. Our Math coursework focuses on developing the processes of logical thought, critical analysis and communication as they are used in mathematics and in the application of mathematics to problem solving.

Complete some or all of the 18 credits you need in order to satisfy requirements to teach college-level coursework complete an additional 18 credits to earn a Master of Arts in Education with Math Specialization.

Learn more about the Concurrent Enrollment in Schools (CES) 18 courses, requirements, and application process.

Program Outcomes

Upon completion of the M.A. in Education program, graduates are expected to be able to do the following:

  • Apply knowledge of child growth and development to plan an engaging learning environment
  • Design and differentiate curriculum, instruction, and assessment to meet diverse learner needs
  • Communicate and collaborate effectively and respectfully in a variety of modes in a range of situations
  • Design effective classroom management strategies based on subject matter, relevant student information, and expectations of the school community
  • Design effective assessments and analyze assessment data to monitor learning and increase achievement
  • Evaluate studies and design research to evaluate educational practice
  • Develop understanding of ethics and laws that apply to educational decision-making
  • Access current information to develop skills of critical and creative thinking, self-evaluation, and resilience to keep pace with a changing educational world
  • Apply knowledge of subject matter and standards to align curriculum, instruction, and assessment
  • Integrate the ethical and professional implications regarding the use of technology in the classroom as it aligns with equity in the classroom for all students

From Start to Finish

  • You can earn your M.A. in Education degree in two years.
  • A cohort model allows for a small team of students to collaborate in convenient locations across the state. Additional online instruction and activities supplement these face-to-face interactions. Cohorts are offered each semester throughout the state. Contact us to talk through location options in your area.


Current students, alumni, and instructors of our M.A. in Education program talk about how well the classes fit into students' lives, the cohort structure, and the value of their Saint Mary's experiences.

Apply Now

Applicants must submit the following:

  1. Completed application form with the nonrefundable application fee (fee not required for alumni or students seeking readmission or veterans and active military personnel), and
  2. An official transcript issued to Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota from the institution posting the applicant’s completed bachelor degree and other relevant transcripts documenting program prerequisites and potential transfer credits.(An official transcript is one that is sent to the university by the credit-granting institution. Transcripts from countries other than the U.S. must be evaluated by a university accepted evaluation source, such as World Education Services, Educational Credential Evaluators, Educational Perspectives, or One Earth International Credential Evaluators and be deemed equivalent to accredited U.S. university standards).
  3. A reflective essay which includes the following:
    • brief description of the applicant’s background, training, and experience; and
    • statement indicating the career goals of the applicant and his or her reasons for seeking admission to the program; and
    • description of the areas the applicant considers to be his or her strengths and areas in which the applicant wishes to develop greater strengths and abilities; and
    • personal information the applicant wishes to share.
  4. Two letters of recommendation that verify professional and/or volunteer experience and academic ability; and
  5. A current résumé listing educational background and work experience.
  6. Applicants with international transcripts may require an English language proficiency exam (TOEFL, IELTS, PTE or MELAB accepted.)

Please Note: Application materials should be sent to the attention of the Office of Admission on the Twin Cities campus.

Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota
Office of Admission
2500 Park Avenue
Minneapolis, MN  55404

Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities, Apple Valley, and Oakdale locations and regional cohorts. 

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

Choose one specialization:  
Discipline specializations:  Math or English 18 cr.

 Education specializations: 
          Culturally Responsive Teaching, or        
          Curriculum and Instruction

15 cr.
Core Courses 18 cr.
Total 33 or 36 cr.

 


English Specialization: 18 cr.

E600 Ways of Reading (3 cr.)

In this course students examine the role of the reader in literary interpretation.  The course considers how diverse audience perspectives as well as the application of theoretical and other critical lenses help construct the life of the text.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate key concepts in literary and cultural theory.
  2. Analyze how individual readings reflect and/or challenge theoretical assumptions about language and literature.
  3. Reconstruct the critical conversation surrounding a work.
  4. Contribute a critical reading that is effectively situated within an existing critical conversation.

E605 The Text in Focus (3 cr.)

In this course students examine how primary texts can be said to generate their own meaning. Particular attention is given to formal qualities, the relationship between literary elements and the text as a whole, classification by genre, and a text's incorporation of other texts.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and analyze formal qualities of texts.
  2. Analyze how individual literary elements contribute to the possible meanings of a text.
  3. Assess texts as representative of a genre/genres.
  4. Analyze intertextual strategies among texts.
  5. Employ effective literary discourse in original, organized, and sophisticated essays that defend a literary thesis with textual evidence.
  6. Consult and incorporate appropriate secondary sources in support of literary claims.

E610 Authors and Authorship (3 cr.)

In this course students examine the significance of the author in one's interpretation of texts. The course explores a variety of potential authorial functions, such as writer of a body of work, spokesperson of a culture, member of a particular tradition or movement, and arbiter of the text's meaning.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the import of an author's biography to the meaning of a text.
  2. Analyze examples of authorial self-construction (narrative voice, intrusion of the author as a character, the author as "divine" architect, the incorporation of author figures or other artists within a text, etc.).
  3. Draw connections between an author's work and traditions or movements with which the author is identified.
  4. Consider how an author's larger body of work affects the meaning of an individual text.

E615 Literature in English from Around the Globe (3 cr.)

In this course students explore texts that attest to the richness and variety of literature composed in English.  Texts from within and beyond the British Isles are examined individually and in relation to each other, especially with regard to Britain's colonial history and the globalization of the English language.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze important elements of literary texts written in English, especially within their broader social, political, and cultural histories.
  2. Evaluate the possibilities and implications of the English language as a vehicle for literary expression.
  3. Employ effective literary discourse in original, organized, and sophisticated essays that defend a literary thesis with textual evidence.
  4. Consult and incorporate appropriate secondary sources in support of literary claims.
  5. Evaluate the suitability of various literary works for different pedagogical purposes.

E620 Literatures of the United States (3 cr.)

In this course students explore various voices and literary practices that have contributed to narratives of American culture and identity. With particular attention paid to the perspectives of neglected or marginalized groups, canonical and non-canonical texts are put in conversation with each other.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze important elements of literary practices and traditions in the United States, especially within a broader social, political, and cultural history.
  2. Employ effective literary discourse in original, organized, and sophisticated essays that defend a literary thesis with textual evidence.
  3. Consult and incorporate appropriate secondary sources in support of literary claims.
  4. Evaluate the suitability of various literary works for different pedagogical purposes.

E625 Ways of Writing (3 cr.)

In this course students explore various writing genres through examination of representative primary texts and through practice in composing original works.  Elements such as audience, rhetorical situation, and voice are highlighted.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze the rhetorical techniques of professional/creative genres through close critical reading.
  2. Write original works that demonstrate competent use of professional discourse and/or creative conventions.
  3. Articulate rhetorical/stylistic insights in class discussions or workshops.
  4. Consult and incorporate appropriate sources in the service of original composition.
  5. Evaluate the suitability of various genres and forms for different rhetorical purposes.

Math Specialization: 18 cr.

M600 Advanced Calculus (3 cr.)

This course provides a formal exploration of elementary topology of both R and Rn, differentiability and Riemann integrability of functions in R and Rn, infinite series of real numbers, sequences of functions, and uniform convergence.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define convergence, continuity, differentiability, and Riemann integrability in R and Rn, and uniform convergence of sequences, series, and functions. (1.c)
  2. Determine and prove convergence or divergence of sequences in R and Rn, series in R, and sequences and series of functions. (2.d)
  3. Evaluate derivatives and Riemann integrals in R and Rn. (4.a)
  4. Prove theorems about differentiability and Riemann integrability in R and Rn. (2.c)

M605 Matrix Theory (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to abstract vector spaces and linear transformations, including basis and dimension, inner product spaces, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, matrices, and canonical forms.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compute basis and dimension of vector spaces, and determinants of matrices. (3.c)
  2. Apply theory and techniques to answer questions about eigenvalues and eigenvectors. (3.a)
  3. Determine canonical forms and factorizations of matrices. (1.b)
  4. Prove theorems about eigenvalues, eigenvectors, canonical forms, factorizations, and inner products. (4.c)

M610 Complex Analysis (3 cr.)

This course provides a formal exploration of functions of a complex variable, including analytic functions, contour integrals, residues, and power series.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Define analytic functions, contour integrals, residues, and power series. (1.c)
  2. Evaluate complex functions, derivatives, integrals, and series. (1.a)
  3. Derive series expansions for complex-valued functions. (2.d)
  4. Prove theorems about limits, derivatives, integrals, series, residues, and poles. (4.c)

M615 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to combinatorics and graph theory, including the Pigeonhole Principle, generating functions, permutations, combinations, principle of inclusion-exclusion, recurrence relations, Ramsey theory, graphs and directed graphs, paths, trees, and  graph coloring.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply counting techniques including permutations, combinations, the Pigeonhole Principle, and the principle of inclusion-exclusion to solve a variety of problems. (3.c)
  2. Construct and use generating functions to solve problems, including recurrence relations. (3.b)
  3. Use graphs and directed graphs to model given situations. (3.d)
  4. Prove and present theorems using combinatorial and graph theoretic techniques. (4.b)

M620 Geometry (3 cr.)

This course provides a formal comparison of non-Euclidean geometry with Euclidean geometry, including results in advanced Euclidean, hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometry.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe axiom sets for geometry. (2.a)
  2. Compare and contrast neutral, Euclidean, hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometries. (1.b)
  3. Analyze and critique proofs regarding advanced Euclidean results. (2.b)
  4. Prove and present theorems from hyperbolic, elliptic, and projective geometries. (4.d)

M625 Probability (3 cr.)

This course provides a formal exploration of the modern theory of probability, including Markov chains, generating functions, discrete/continuous probability distributions, expectation, random variables, conditional probability, independence, and joint distributions.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify appropriate probability distributions, including joint distributions, to model given situations. (3.d)
  2. Find and use moment generating functions to answer questions about random variables. (3.b)
  3. Calculate conditional probability and conditional expectation. (3.a)
  4. Define and use Markov chains to answer questions about expectations and probability. (3.e)

Culturally Responsive Teaching Specialization: 15 cr.

GCRT5205 Understanding Race and Culture (3 cr.)

Course participants explore their beliefs and educational experts' perspectives on culture and race and their impact on teaching and learning. Emphasis is also placed on the systemic nature of the role of race in educational environments.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the varying perspectives, systemic nature, and challenges connected to race and culture, including their own.
  2. Understand the implications of culture as a fluid and dynamic social construct in relation to K-12 settings.
  3. Compare and contrast the culture of school environments to the culture of students.
  4. Research and evaluate strategies that demonstrate an understanding of culture and race.
  5. Demonstrate self-reflection in a collaborative environment where participants learn from and with one another.

GCRT5206 Principles of Culturally Responsive Classrooms and Teaching (3 cr.)

This course examines strategies to create an inclusive classroom environment that is responsive and relevant to students and their families and the ways in which all students learn. The course focuses on the linguistic, social, emotional, and academic systems in school communities for creating a community of learners.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify principles and strategies essential for creating a culturally responsive classroom.
  2. Analyze the relationship among the lived experiences of learners in school, home, and community that impact student engagement and achievement.
  3. Articulate the concepts related to a learner-centered approach to teaching and learning that incorporates cultural, linguistic, and community values.
  4. Identify individual perspectives, biases, and strengths to facilitate more effective teaching.
     

GCRT5208 Designing Culturally Responsive Teaching (3 cr.)

In this course, the principles of culturally responsive teaching are applied to instructional planning and assessment. Topics include determining instructional objectives, aligning principles of culturally responsive teaching to district/local standards and frameworks, and designing and/or differentiating culturally responsive assessments.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify the principles and concepts essential for rigorous and relevant instructional planning.
  2. Employ strategies to develop rigorous and relevant curriculum, assessments, and learning environments that meet the needs of racially, ethnically and linguistically diverse learners.
  3. Create integrated, standards-based instructional plans and assessments that document the principles of effective instructional design and culturally responsive teaching.
     

GCRT5209 Eliminating Racial Disparities in Student Achievement (3 cr.)

This course addresses the specific issues that contribute to the disparities in student achievement that exist among K-12 student groups. Concepts, professional knowledge, and research-based strategies designed to address these disparities are discussed, analyzed, and applied through a case study approach.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Use data to define what disparities in student achievement are and how norming influences misconceptions.
  2. Analyze situations to identify challenges and systemic conditions that lead to and/or contribute to the disparities in student achievement on standardized tests.
  3. Research and evaluate solutions that eliminate disparities in student achievement.
  4. Develop and modify instructional plans that integrate the essential skills, knowledge, and strategies to reduce the achievement gap.
  5. Identify individual practices, biases, and strengths that perpetuate or eliminate disparities in student achievement to facilitate more effective teaching.
     

GCRT5210 Comprehensive Application of Principles (3 cr.)

In this course, students complete a comprehensive performance assessment that documents and presents their individual growth, understanding, and application of the program outcomes.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Comprehensively integrate essential concepts from the program to demonstrate their cultural competence.
  2. Articulate the change in one's own perceptions and approaches since the initial program assessment.
  3. Evaluate the design and implementation of a culturally responsive instructional plan and the data on change in student achievement.
  4. Evaluate relevant research utilized to shape professional practice.
     

Curriculum and Instruction Specialization: 15 cr.

EDMA612 Engaging Learning Environment (3 cr.)

Effective classroom management methods which establish positive environments focused on learning are studied.Dispositions of mindset, brain compatible learning, and culturally responsive teaching are applied as well as exploring personal assumptions and biases to create an equitable, student-centered environment.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze various methods to better understand all students in your classroom.
  2. Identify and explain classroom management models that establish a positive learning environment.
  3. Develop awareness of cultural competence through self-assessment of assumptions and biases.
  4. Understand and apply principles of cultural competence to create a classroom environment of respect and rapport.
  5. Plan and create a learning environment that supports the academic achievement and personal development of each learner.
     

EDMA614 Communication and Collaboration (3 cr.)

In this course, students review and practice skills of written and oral communication for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students develop effective collaboration skills to facilitate consensus and promote conflict resolution.  Students learn and apply processes of academic writing using the APA style.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate competent writing skills including proper grammar, structure, form and tone appropriate to the audience.
  2. Use the APA style when writing papers and referencing research.
  3. Develop a coherent summary and analysis of literature on a selected topic.
  4. Demonstrate public speaking skills, including adapting one's speaking style to the audience and using appropriate technology.
  5. Demonstrate ability to facilitate collaboration and resolve conflicts.

EDMA620 Curriculum Design (3 cr.)

National and state standards, selected curriculum design models, knowledge of content, and child development are used as tools to develop curriculum with considerations for diversity in culture, gender, and aptitude/achievement. Course and unit plans are developed/refined, focusing on Stage 1 of UbD within a student's specific academic area.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of standards-based national, state and district level curriculum development and education concepts and processes.
  2. Plan curriculum to meet educational standards.
  3. Create a standard based unit of study incorporating Stage 1 of UbD components.
  4. Analyze curriculum documents to determine their theoretical basis, their alignment with state standards, and their effectiveness in directing instruction.
  5. Apply culturally responsive teaching components and materials as they evaluate their and choose curriculum to address the needs of a diverse student population.
  6. Plan for incorporation of 21st century skills and other higher level thinking skills into Stage 1 of UbD or unit design.

EDMA622 Assessment and Evaluation (3 cr.)

Methods and tools for diagnosis, evaluation, and grading of student learning are studied. Strengths and limitations of various types of assessments are examined. Classroom assessments that are aligned to standards, curriculum, and instruction are planned, created, and used. Assessment data to monitor student progress, inform continuing instruction, and assign grades are analyzed and interpreted.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Interpret assessment data, recognizing strengths and limitations of various types of assessments.
  2. Use assessment data to identify student needs and establish flexible, differentiated instructional groups.
  3. Understand basic concepts of statistics to interpret test results.
  4. Plan assessment and grading procedures that align with student objectives, state standards and course/grade level content.
  5. Apply principles of test construction to create classroom tests aligned with instructional objectives.
  6. Develop performance tasks and scoring procedures to determine students' ability to apply, analyze and synthesize information.
  7. Understand issues of equity, validity and reliability associated with various methods of grading.
  8. Understand the statutes for the teach evaluation and the implications for the profession.

EDMA624 Effective Instruction (3 cr.)

This course focuses on researched-based "best practice" principles for meeting the needs of diverse learners. Methods of planning and designing differentiated instruction based on pre-assessment and achievement indicators are applied. Stage 3 of UbD is applied using information on student readiness, interest, and ability to be appropriate to the outcomes of content and a variety of best practices techniques.  Methods to foster 21st century and higher level thinking skills among all students are explored and applied.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine current theories and research-based literature to understand multiple components of effective instructional practice.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to plan instruction, utilizing a lesson design model.
  3. Create an instructional plan that addresses a curricular objective by using multiple instructional strategies.
  4. Plan instruction using 21st century and higher level thinking skills and processes that deepen learning and increase rigor.
  5. Adapt lessons to differentiate instruction for groups of students with differing abilities as determined by assessment data.
  6. Demonstrate ability to monitor student learning during a lesson and adjust instruction accordingly.
     

Core Courses: 18 cr.

EDMA600 Orientation Session (0 cr.)

This orientation session provides an introduction to the outcomes for the Master of Arts in Education program. As reflected in the Lasallian philosophy, self-evaluation leads to setting personal goals and the establishment of a plan for life long learning. The initial expectations for academic writing, APA style, and portfolio development are presented.

EDMA604 Reflection and Resiliency (3 cr.)

In this seminar, processes for critical thinking and reflection are applied to significant changes in professional practice. Strategies for maintaining personal resiliency in a field of rapidly continuing change are explored. The purpose, criteria, and methods of reflection are introduced and applied.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and apply frameworks for change and resiliency; analyzing and evaluating the practical application and continued use of these frameworks in professional practice.
  2. Apply critical thinking skills and reflective processes related to significant changes in professional practice.
  3. Examine personal and professional goals identifying specific actions, anticipated challenges, use of resiliency strategies and plan for continued growth.
  4. Understand the purpose, methodology and application of reflective practice showing evidence of personal growth and competency related to program outcomes.
     

EDMA610 Child Growth and Development (3 cr.)

The educational theories, including those of Maslow, Piaget, Kohlberg, Jensen, Erikson, and Vygotsky, Bronfenbrenner and others are studied to describe the typical and abnormal development patterns of children from birth to adolescence. These theories are used to describe students in the current work environment. Early warning signs of mental health disorders, abuse, and/or addiction are identified.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1.  Identify and explain the major educational theories of Maslow, Piaget, Kohlberg, Jensen, Erikson, Vygotsky and Bronfenbrenner.
  2.  Apply theories of child development to identify typical and abnormal growth and behavioral theories to identify possible causes for the behavior of selected students in the work environment.
  3. Use multiple behavioral theories to identify possible causes for the behavior of selected students in the work environment.
  4. Explain the responsibility of the teacher in recognizing and reporting the early warning signs of mental health disorders, abuse, and/or addiction.
     

EDMA630 Educational Research (3 cr.)

This course focuses on recognizing, designing, and conducting valid, reliable, and ethical educational research for improving teaching and learning. Published studies are critiqued by identifying strengths and limitations of the methodology and evaluating potential impact on educational practice. Action research design, evaluation of literature and published studies, decision analysis, and methods for communicating and implementing results are practiced through several experiences.  Much of this course requires online, independent research, writing, and revision based on electronic correspondence with instructor and peers.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Recognize and differentiate between the appropriate use of and the processes involved in conducting descriptive/experimental research and conducting quantitative/qualitative research.
  2. Develop skills to generate research questions, review relevant literature and devise a plan for research.
  3. Critique published educational research by identifying limitations, assumptions, and biases of the studies.
  4. Determine appropriate sources of data and data analysis for action research.
  5. Design basic action research incorporating accepted design and reporting methods.
  6. Design a plan for communicating and implementing action research findings within an educational organizational setting.

EDMA632 Ethics and Law (3 cr.)

The focus of this course is on the laws and ethics that govern school districts and their employees. Key federal and state laws and case law are studied in relation to current educational issues. Distinctions are made among personal beliefs, cultural norms, ethical codes, and legal standards in the educational environment. The role of an ethical educational leader in a school community is explored.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand how personal beliefs, cultural norms, ethical codes and legal standards affect expectations for professional behavior in an educational setting.
  2. Review, analyze and interpret federal and Minnesota statutory law related to education.
  3. Examine landmark court cases to understand, analyze and apply legal precedent to K-12 education.
  4. Apply legal requirements and ethical considerations to educational decision making.
  5. Explore responsibilities of teachers in situations where personal beliefs and organizational/professional expectations conflict.

EDMA634 Action Research Project (3 cr.)

In this summative course students apply research skills relevant to professional settings.  Published studies are critiqued by identifying strengths and limitations of the methodology and evaluating potential impact on educational practice.  The action research project results in a written paper, which includes an introduction, a review of current literature, research questions, a description of the methodology and means of evaluation, the findings and interpretation of results, and possible questions for further study. Research designs, evaluation of published studies, decision analysis, and methods for communicating and implementing results are practiced through several experiences.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Compare and contrast descriptive/experimental research and quantitative/qualitative research identifying their application to educational practice.
  2. Critique published educational research by identifying limitations, assumptions, and biases of the studies.
  3. Apply skills to create and implement a research plan.
  4. Use academic writing skills and APA style in the development of an action research project.
  5. Demonstrate public speaking skills including adapting one's speaking style to the audience and using appropriate technology.
     

EDMA637 Integrating Technology in the Curriculum (3 cr.)

Instructional technology models are analyzed. A variety of technology tools for enhancing productivity, teaching, and learning and their professional and ethical implications are explored. Projects, lessons, and teaching materials to integrate technology into the curriculum are examined and created.

Upon completion of the course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Use desktop publishing, database applications, spreadsheet applications, word processor applications, multimedia applications, online resources, and Internet web page applications.
  2. Explain the ethical and professional implications and their personal philosophy regarding the use of technology in the classroom and curriculum.
  3. Using technology, design and/or integrate lessons and assessments into the curriculum.
  4. Research and critically analyze technological tools and their impact on the learning environment.

Connect With Us

Michelle Dougherty, M.A.

SGPP Admission - Assistant Director of Admission

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH112

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5122

mdougher@smumn.edu

Faculty

Lynn Albee, Ed.D.

School of Education - Assistant Dean and Program Director of M.A. in Education

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH170

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5128

lalbee@smumn.edu

Lynn Albee Ed.D.
Craig Jensen, M.S.

MA in Education Program - Associate Director

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH104

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5157

cjensen@smumn.edu

Craig Jensen M.S.
Julie Kirsch

Program Coordinator, Master of Arts in Education

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 728-5181

jkirsch@smumn.edu

John Braun, Ed.D.

Educational Administration Licensure - Adjunct Professor

David Eisenmann, M.A.

Education - Adjunct Assistant Professor

Willie Johnson, Ph.D.

Education - Adjunct Program Professor

(952) 487-8363

wjohnson@smumn.edu

Willie Johnson Ph.D.
Claudia Kittock, Ph.D.

Education and Education Administration - Adjunct School Professor

(763) 433-1815

ckittock@smumn.edu

Theodore May, Ed.S.

Education - Adjunct Program Instructor

Theodore May Ed.S.
Judith McKay, M.A.

MA in Education - Adjunct Instructor

(612) 723-7993

jmckay@smumn.edu

Daniel Sadowski, J.D.

Education and Educational Administration - Adjunct Associate Professor

Hugh Skaja, Ed.D.

Education - Adjunct Professor

Campus Box: # 28

hskaja@smumn.edu

Hugh Skaja Ed.D.
Nicole Trujillo, M.A.

MA in Education - Adjunct Instructor

Nicole Trujillo M.A.
Professor smiling with students

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