Elementary Education Major

Elementary education forms the foundation on which children build their future. It is the essential basis for developing learners who possess the skills to explore the boundless opportunities life has to offer.

Saint Mary’s School of Education is committed to preparing elementary education majors to build relationships with young learners, equipping them with the tools they need to build a positive future.

Elementary education majors benefit from Saint Mary’s commitment to small class sizes, one-on-one attention from professors, faculty with years of classroom experience, and field experiences that begin in the sophomore year. Strong emphasis is placed on gaining extensive field experience in a variety of settings prior to graduation, and faculty connect these field experiences to coursework, combining theory and practice, modeling effective instruction, providing relevant context, and building confidence to address the variety of situations future teachers will encounter.

Career Options

A majority of graduates pursue classroom teaching in public or private K-6/8 schools. Others go on to seek advanced degrees from Saint Mary's in special education, literacy, ELL/bilingual education, educational administration, curriculum and instruction, school counseling, or school psychology. Education majors also have career opportunities in other fields such as business and management.

High School Preparation

English Literature and Writing; Mathematics; Biology; Physics; History; Psychology; World Language; Speech

Enhance Your Experience

Elementary education majors often pursue additional courses in psychology and sociology.

Subject Area Specialization Options

Students choosing to be certified in Elementary Education take courses leading to licensure in grades K–6. In addition to an elementary license, majors may choose to complete a subject area specialization (also referred to as an endorsement) in Communication Arts and Literature, Mathematics, Social Studies, Science, or Spanish.

Degree Requirements

A. All of the following:

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B121 Botany and Zoology II Laboratory (1 cr.)

Laboratory studies complementing B120 include plant and animal hormones and reproduction, bacterial techniques, and phylogenetic investigations.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

M108 Mathematical Concepts I: Systems (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, operations, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

Elementary Education Major

(grades K–6 with optional 5–8 or K–8 endorsement):

Students seeking elementary certification may also complete an endorsement (5–8) in one of the following disciplines: communication arts and literature, general science, mathematics, social studies, or world language and culture: Spanish (K–8). Advising note to students taking a general science endorsement: please see substitution courses for physics.

A. All of the following:

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B121 Botany and Zoology II Laboratory (1 cr.)

Laboratory studies complementing B120 include plant and animal hormones and reproduction, bacterial techniques, and phylogenetic investigations.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

M108 Mathematical Concepts I: Systems (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, operations, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

Elementary Education Major

(grades K–6 with optional 5–8 or K–8 endorsement):

Students seeking elementary certification may also complete an endorsement (5–8) in one of the following disciplines: communication arts and literature, general science, mathematics, social studies, or world language and culture: Spanish (K–8). Advising note to students taking a general science endorsement: please see substitution courses for physics.

Please Note:

One additional literature course numbered above E302

F. The following courses:

COM111 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 cr.)

A study of the history, production methods, and social and economic factors of the mass media. This course gives students an understanding of print media, broadcast media and public relations by analyzing the technical development and social impact of media.

E220 Argumentative and Research Writing (3 cr.)

In this intermediate writing course, students learn how to read and produce informative and persuasive essays. Students write essays and a research paper incorporating outside source material. Review of MLA citation and documentation style is included, along with practice in doing library and web-based research.

E250 Literary Imagination (3 cr.)

This course for potential English majors and minors introduces students to various critical reading strategies, provides practice in close reading and the development and defense of a thesis appropriate for literary analysis, and offers multiple writing opportunities. The course aims to convey a sense of literary history by exposing students to intensive study of the representation of a particular theme or strain (e.g., ambition, desire) in different genres over time.

E295 Practical Grammar (2 cr.)

The purpose of this course is to teach students to identify basic and advanced grammatical structures. Students are asked to apply this grammatical knowledge to exercises that require them to edit for grammar and punctuation.

E302 An American Conflict: The Individual vs. Society (3 cr.)

Especially because of its strong historical emphasis on the individual and individualism, there has always existed in American culture a dynamic tension between the individual and society. This course explores how major American authors have chosen to present and interpret this theme by tracing it from its roots in early American literature to its most sophisticated expression in works written during the latter half of the 19th and first part of the 20th century.

E325 The Art of the Essay (3 cr.)

In this course, students produce a variety of essays that cover a range of rhetorical situations. Emphasis is placed on strategies for developing and organizing essays as well as on rhetorical concerns, such as audience, purpose, voice, and style. Attention is also paid to integrating research, both formal and informal, into students' work.

ED385 Adolescent Literature (1 cr.)

This course surveys literature appropriate to the needs, interests and abilities of middle and secondary school students. It also focuses on the selection, effective presentation and the developmental value of currently available reading material based on specific developmental tasks, and identifiable characteristics, traits, special problems and reading interests of adolescents. This course is required for English majors seeking certification in Minnesota.

Communication Arts and Literature Endorsement for Grades 5–8:

A. All of the following:

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B121 Botany and Zoology II Laboratory (1 cr.)

Laboratory studies complementing B120 include plant and animal hormones and reproduction, bacterial techniques, and phylogenetic investigations.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

M108 Mathematical Concepts I: Systems (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, operations, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

Elementary Education Major

(grades K–6 with optional 5–8 or K–8 endorsement):

Students seeking elementary certification may also complete an endorsement (5–8) in one of the following disciplines: communication arts and literature, general science, mathematics, social studies, or world language and culture: Spanish (K–8). Advising note to students taking a general science endorsement: please see substitution courses for physics.

G. The following substitutions should be made

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

P201 Introductory Physics I (3 cr.)

This course is the first half of a two-semester introductory, calculus-based, physics course for all students planning to enter one of the scientific professions. It covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, oscillations, and fluid mechanics.

P202 Introductory Physics I Laboratory (1 cr.)

One three-hour laboratory is held each week covering topics studied in the lectures.

H. The following courses:

(either M148 and M149 or M151):

B110 Botany and Zoology I (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed upon photosynthesis and respiration,and physiological processes including nutrition, gas exchange, transportation and regulation of body fluids. It is an investigation of the structure and function of both plants and animals and intended as an introductory overview.

B111 Botany and Zoology I Laboratory (1 cr.)

These laboratory studies complement the concepts presented in B110. Investigations including physiological and molecular relationships and interactions are the basis for the course.

C131 General Chemistry I (3 cr.)

This course covers the fundamental principles upon which the study of chemistry is based. Stoichiometry, atomic structure, molecular structure, chemical bonding, behavior of gases, kinetic molecular theory, properties of solutions, chemical reactivity and thermochemistry are included.

C133 General Chemistry I Laboratory (1 cr.)

This laboratory is an inquiry-based approach to understanding the process of doing chemistry. Each week, as a team member with a specific role working for a consulting company, the student receives a letter from a "chemical client" requesting the solution to a chemical problem. It is the responsibility of the team to design a solution, collect data, and report the results to the client in report form.

C142 General Chemistry II (3 cr.)

This course includes the study of the chemistry of molecular forces, redox reactions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium theory, electrochemistry, chemical dynamics, organic chemistry, phase behavior and solution chemistry.

C144 General Chemistry II Laboratory (1 cr.)

This laboratory is an inquiry-based approach to understanding the process of doing chemistry. Each week, as a team member with a specific role working for a consulting company, the student receives a letter from a "chemical client" requesting the solution to a chemical problem. It is the responsibility of the team to design a solution, collect data, and report the results to the client in report form.

M148 Calculus I with Precalculus (part 1) (4 cr.)

This course, followed by M149, provides a two-semester sequence that covers the material of M151 along with built-in coverage of precalculus topics. Topics in M148 include: solving equations, functions, classes of functions (polynomial, rational, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic), right triangle trigonometry, angle measure, limits and continuity, derivatives, rules for derivatives. Credit is not granted for this course and M151 or courses equivalent to college algebra and college trigonometry.

M149 Calculus I with Precalculus (part 2) (4 cr.)

This course completes the two-semester sequence that begins with M148, and together with M148 provides a two-semester sequence that covers the material of M151 along with built-in coverage of precalculus topics. Topics in M149 include: trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, rules for derivatives, applications of derivatives, and definite and indefinite integrals. Credit is not granted for this course and M151.

M151 Calculus I (4 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the differential and integral calculus. Topics include: the concepts of function, limit, continuity, derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, and an introduction to transcendental functions. Credit is not granted for this course and M148 and M149.

P211 Introductory Physics II (3 cr.)

This course is the second half of a two-semester introductory, calculus-based, physics course for all students planning to enter one of the scientific professions. It covers the fundamental principles of waves, physical and geometrical optics, and electricity and magnetism.

P212 Introductory Physics II Laboratory (1 cr.)

One three-hour laboratory is held each week covering topics studied in the lectures.

General Science Endorsement for Grades 5–8:

A. All of the following:

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B121 Botany and Zoology II Laboratory (1 cr.)

Laboratory studies complementing B120 include plant and animal hormones and reproduction, bacterial techniques, and phylogenetic investigations.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

M108 Mathematical Concepts I: Systems (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, operations, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

Elementary Education Major

(grades K–6 with optional 5–8 or K–8 endorsement):

Students seeking elementary certification may also complete an endorsement (5–8) in one of the following disciplines: communication arts and literature, general science, mathematics, social studies, or world language and culture: Spanish (K–8). Advising note to students taking a general science endorsement: please see substitution courses for physics.

I. The following courses

(either M148/M149, or M151 - endorsement also includes M108 and M109 from section A above):

M148 Calculus I with Precalculus (part 1) (4 cr.)

This course, followed by M149, provides a two-semester sequence that covers the material of M151 along with built-in coverage of precalculus topics. Topics in M148 include: solving equations, functions, classes of functions (polynomial, rational, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic), right triangle trigonometry, angle measure, limits and continuity, derivatives, rules for derivatives. Credit is not granted for this course and M151 or courses equivalent to college algebra and college trigonometry.

M149 Calculus I with Precalculus (part 2) (4 cr.)

This course completes the two-semester sequence that begins with M148, and together with M148 provides a two-semester sequence that covers the material of M151 along with built-in coverage of precalculus topics. Topics in M149 include: trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, rules for derivatives, applications of derivatives, and definite and indefinite integrals. Credit is not granted for this course and M151.

M151 Calculus I (4 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the differential and integral calculus. Topics include: the concepts of function, limit, continuity, derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, and an introduction to transcendental functions. Credit is not granted for this course and M148 and M149.

M408 Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to strengthen the mathematical background of students in elementary education. It is required for the endorsement in mathematics for elementary education. The course consists of a selection of mathematical topics of wide interest and applicability. Topics include: graph models, linear programming, scheduling and packing problems, allocation problems, and social decision problems. This course may not be used as an upper-division elective for the mathematics major or minor or the mathematics education major.

ST132 Reasoning with Statistics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to develop student facility in the use of statistical methods and the understanding of statistical concepts. The course takes a practical approach based on statistical examples taken from everyday life. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. Appropriate technology is used to perform the calculations for many applications, and correspondingly an emphasis is placed on interpreting the results of statistical procedures. Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215, B392 or ST232.

Mathematics Endorsement for Grades 5–8:

A. All of the following:

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B121 Botany and Zoology II Laboratory (1 cr.)

Laboratory studies complementing B120 include plant and animal hormones and reproduction, bacterial techniques, and phylogenetic investigations.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

M108 Mathematical Concepts I: Systems (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, operations, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

Elementary Education Major

(grades K–6 with optional 5–8 or K–8 endorsement):

Students seeking elementary certification may also complete an endorsement (5–8) in one of the following disciplines: communication arts and literature, general science, mathematics, social studies, or world language and culture: Spanish (K–8). Advising note to students taking a general science endorsement: please see substitution courses for physics.

J. The following courses:

AN300 Introduction to Anthropology (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of human culture. Topics: anthropology as an academic discipline, nature of human language, human culture, history of anthropological thought, and human social organizations.

EC261 Principles of Microeconomics (3 cr.)

A traditional introduction to the principles of microeconomics, concentrating on behavior of the household and the firm. The course analyzes factors determining prices, production and allocation of economic resources. Current issues are emphasized.

GE305 Introduction to Geography (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of geography, with special emphasis on linking geography's basic concepts to the realms and major regions of the world.

H111 Global History to 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to world history from the origins of civilization to 1500. The course focuses on the societies and cultures of Eurasia: Southwest Asia (the Middle East), India, Persia, China, Greece and Rome, Europe, and Africa, and the Americas. Major themes include the founding and development of the world's great religions; political ideas, institutions and practices; law and legal institutions; society and economy; war, conquest and empire; the encounters between cultures; and the richness and diversity of human experience and aspiration in the foundational eras of the world's civilizations. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

PY211 Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)

This course explores the study of growth and development across the life span. Students are introduced to the reciprocal nature of biological, cognitive, social and cultural factors on the developing person. This is a research based introduction to understanding the expression of development in everyday life as it extends to family, friendship, youth ministry, school, neighborhood, sports, health care, and social services.

Social Studies Endorsement for Grades 5–8:

A. All of the following:

B120 Botany and Zoology II (3 cr.)

Emphasis is placed on plant and animal phyla, organs and organ systems of both plants and animals.

B121 Botany and Zoology II Laboratory (1 cr.)

Laboratory studies complementing B120 include plant and animal hormones and reproduction, bacterial techniques, and phylogenetic investigations.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

M108 Mathematical Concepts I: Systems (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: set theory, numbers and numeration, operations, number theory, rational numbers, and problem solving. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

M109 Mathematical Concepts II: Geometry (3 cr.)

This course includes concepts essential to mathematics and is required for elementary education majors. Topics include: informal geometry, measurement, problem solving, descriptive statistics, and elementary probability. This course is open only to elementary education majors.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P155 Foundations of Physics (3 cr.)

This course is intended for elementary education majors as well as other non-science majors. It examines the conceptual frameworks that underlie physics, including mechanics, heat, electricity and magnetism, and light.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

Elementary Education Major

(grades K–6 with optional 5–8 or K–8 endorsement):

Students seeking elementary certification may also complete an endorsement (5–8) in one of the following disciplines: communication arts and literature, general science, mathematics, social studies, or world language and culture: Spanish (K–8). Advising note to students taking a general science endorsement: please see substitution courses for physics.

One additional Spanish literature course from:

SP401 Medieval/Renaissance Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to major authors and literary works of Spain from the medieval period through the end of the 17th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP402 18th–20th Century Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Spain from the 18th through the 20th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP403 Latin American Literature through the 18th Century (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Latin America from the colonial period through the 18th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP404 19th–20th Century Latin American Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of modern Latin America. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are studied in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

Please Note:

Study abroad or significant domestic experience in a Spanish language environment is required.

World Language and Culture: Spanish Endorsement for Grades K–8:

Students who wish to pursue a minor in Spanish for teaching purposes must take at least 21 credits in Spanish plus the prescribed education courses.  All students seeking K–8 licensure in world language and culture must demonstrate an intermediate-high proficiency level in all four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) as outlined in the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines and successfully complete the following language courses plus two or three additional courses:

ED393 World Languages & Cultural Methods: Grades K–12 (2 cr.)

The purpose of this course is to prepare pre-service teachers with methods for teaching successfully in the area of world languages in grades K through 12. Topics covered in the course include lesson and unit planning, national standards, and questioning skills. Classroom management, effective teaching strategies, and utilization of technology to enhance instruction are stressed.

SP101 Beginning Conversational Spanish I (4 cr.)

Through the use of proficiency-based methodologies and multimedia this course helps students get acquainted with Hispanic cultures, discover similarities and differences between the target culture and their own, develop basic communication skills necessary to function in a Spanish-speaking country, and acquire basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Enrollment is limited to students who have not previously studied Spanish or who place into the course following the placement interview.

SP102 Beginning Conversational Spanish II (4 cr.)

A continuation of SP101.

SP201 Intermediate Conversational Spanish I (4 cr.)

This course uses an intensified conversational approach to build vocabulary, to review grammar, and to introduce the student to selected readings dealing with Hispanic literature, culture, and civilization.

SP202 Intermediate Conversational Spanish II (4 cr.)

A continuation of SP201.

SP301 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 cr.)

This course provides the oral practice and vocabulary necessary to move from simply describing the physical world toward a broader and more sophisticated use of the language. The students develop analysis, synthesis and evaluation skills; compare and contrast their own and the target culture; and hypothesize about links between the Spanish language and contemporary culture.

SP302 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 cr.)

This course offers intensive practice in the refinement of writing skills and vocabulary building through a variety of readings, exercises, and numerous writing activities. The students work toward a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language.

SP331 Civilization/Culture Spain (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the civilizations and cultures which have existed on the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. The students study the political, social, artistic, and intellectual evolution of Spain through a series of texts, images, and videos.

SP332 Civilization/Culture Latin America (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the diversity of the Hispanic world. Through a series of texts and videos the students address several important social, political, and cultural themes.