Integrated General Education

Do you want to make a difference? We believe that with a strong knowledge base, applied skills, passion, and ingenuity — you can be the change you want to see in the world.

Saint Mary’s is launching a new, Integrated General Education Program that will set you apart from other graduates. Today’s employers are looking for leaders who can view problems from varied lenses.

While every student will gain a valuable perspective through our Integrated General Education Program, each path is as unique as the student taking it. We know you each have different interests, dreams, and goals.

Our first-year students starting in fall 2018 will be enrolled. This distinctive new program offers you:

  • An interdisciplinary minor
    Choose from Environmental Sustainability; Creativity and Inquiry; Global Diversity and Social Justice; and Self, Society, and the Sacred — and then chart your own path through courses that interest you. (You will also have the time and opportunity to choose a second minor in a discipline of your choice.)
  • A senior-year capstone project where you will address real-world issues through a local, community project
  • Exemplary skills in oral communication and writing, which are at the very top of potential employers' wish lists
  • An e-portfolio that showcases your experiences and accomplishments

The Program

The program — rooted in Saint Mary’s Lasallian Catholic identity and mission — has three main components: the First-Year Experience, the Interdisciplinary Minor, and the Capstone.

Your First-Year Experience focuses around themes of place, purpose, and well-being. During your first year at Saint Mary’s, your Integrated General Education experience begins with:

  • An Anchor Course, 4 credits to be taken in fall. This course will expose you to an interesting topic in a field of choice outside of your major. 
    [The Lasallian Honors Program has its own Anchor Course.] 
  • First-Year Writing, 4 credits, taken in either semester. This course will include work in reflective writing, which will prepare you for the portfolio.
    [Honors students will not need to take this course.]
  • Quantitative Reasoning: 3 credits, taken in either semester.
  • Theology: 3 credits, taken in either semester.

Your faculty adviser will help you chart your own path through the interdisciplinary minors. 

Students will choose among four minors, or they will move directly into the Lasallian Honors sequence, which functions as its own “Great Books” minor.

Environmental Sustainability
We understand “environment” as the biological, economic, and cultural surroundings on which we depend and with which we interact. What resources are available to us, and how do we exercise wise stewardship of them?

Creativity and Inquiry
How do you see? How do you know? How do you create? This integrated minor examines the role of inquiry, intelligence, creativity, and innovation in human endeavors.

Global Diversity and Social Justice
This minor will focus on diversity of populations, the distribution of resources, and issues of global and social justice.

Self, Society, and the Sacred
What is our responsibility to ourselves, our society, the natural world, and the sacred? In this minor, you will examine how people from a variety of times and cultures have explored these questions and begin to develop answers of your own.

Students within the same minor can have a different general education experience, based upon the courses you choose. All minors will include courses representing these disciplinary areas:

  • Theology, 3 credits
  • Philosophy, 3 credits
  • History, 3 credits
  • Literature (English and Spanish), 3 credits
  • Math, Computer Science, and Natural Sciences (including a lab), 6-8 credits
  • Social Sciences (Psychology, Sociology, Criminal Justice, Political Science, Human Services), 3 credits
  • Arts (Theatre and Dance, Music, Art and Design) and Communication, 3 credits

A Capstone project at the end of your four years will bring together students from different disciplines to work on a complex community project. Through this project, you will learn how having a broad perspective can help to build innovative connections and solutions. 

For Transfer Students

  • Transfer credits can apply to any of the minors if they fit the theme and disciplinary areas of the minor.
  • We will work with you on an individual basis to apply your credits in an appropriate way.
  • If you can demonstrate that you meet the disciplinary area requirements (but not in a way that suggests any of the four existing minors), you may work with an adviser to propose an independent interdisciplinary minor.

Degree Requirements

Overview

This interdisciplinary minor examines the processes through which humans ask questions, formulate ideas, imagine possibilities, construct knowledge, experiment, design, create, discover, and innovate. Through study of ground-breaking inventions and paradigm-shifting discoveries in the sciences; of historical and cultural shifts in our attitudes toward technology, industry, artistry, and authority; and of the artistic expressions and performances that both reflect and contest our cultures, students will consider what motivates us to learn, to explore, and to create; what we consider knowledge and why; what tools we use to problem-solve; and what processes we engage as we reflect on the implications of our inventions. The combination of courses included in this minor thus allows students to explore, from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, both the theory and practice behind human inquiry and creative endeavors.

Of the disciplinary distribution required for graduation, at least 18 credits must be taken from the following list of courses to complete this Minor. No more than 9 credits from lower-division courses can contribute to the minor.

The following courses contribute to the Creativity and Inquiry Minor:

A. Theology (3 credits)

TH260 Foundations in Catholic Theology (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Catholic theology that explores fundamental tenets, e.g., the Triune God, the creation of the cosmos and humanity, sin, grace, salvation, revelation, sanctification, and sacramental imagination. Students attend to the development of these creedal doctrines building on their biblical understanding of how these doctrines frame the human experience through a coherent system of thought, which addresses the challenges that modernity and post-modernity pose to the Christian world view. Students who have taken TH209 Methods in Catholic Theology should not take this course.

B. Philosophy (3 credits)

One of the following:

PH362 Business Ethics (3 cr.)

The course examines critically the major ethical or moral theories that are at the basis of decision making in the complex area of contemporary behavior we know as "the business world." It is recommended for business majors.

PH370 Philosophy of Art (3 cr.)

This interdisciplinary course explores the relationship between philosophy of art or aesthetics and developments in art history. The course involves a study of traditional and contemporary theories of art, an examination of selected figures and movements in art history, and an analysis of the vital interrelationship between the two disciplines of philosophy and art.

C. History (3 credits)

One of the following:

H114 U.S. History since 1865 (3 cr.)

This course offers an overview of the history of the United States between the end of the Civil War and the present day.  It emphasizes broad developments that transformed American life:  the transformation of a rural-agrarian into an urban-industrial society; the shift from "isolationism" to internationalism; the rise of liberalism, the growth of the federal government, and the development of the military-industrial complex; the rise of a conservative movement and the subsequent polarization of American politics and life, especially as seen in the Cultural Wars; and the ubiquitous role technology played in these developments.  In addition, the course looks at these transformations through the lenses of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, and class, in order to investigate how these broad developments affected people in an increasingly diverse nation.

H357 The History of Rock and Roll (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the rise, development, and sociocultural impact of rock and roll, broadly defined to include soul, rhythm and blues, punk, reggae, country, hip hop, heavy metal, and other genres that have become essential parts of American popular culture. Through critical analysis of the texts, images, sounds, business practices, and media machinery of rock culture, as well as of rock and roll's profound impact on television, fashion, race relations, gender relations, advertising, and politics students gain an understanding of the functions of popular art and culture in the political, social, and economic life of the United States. The course challenges students to critically examine primary source materials and secondary readings about topics such as the southern roots of rock music, postwar youth culture, race and racism, class, gender and sexuality, technology and mass media, the culture wars, and rock music as an American export, and thereby come to a greater understanding of the development and interaction of modern and postmodern culture.

H366 Industrialization and Its Discontents: Europe, 1750-1914 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the history of Europe during its explosive period of modernization, beginning with two concurrent world-changing events — the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Using a variety of sources, including works by historians but also primary sources ranging from manifestos and letters to plays and novels, students investigate the ideas and movements which emerged from this "dual revolution" to change the world, including imperialism, liberalism, socialism, feminism, and nationalism.

H367 Europe in the Era of World War 1914–1945 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Europe's "thirty year crisis," from the outbreak of World War I in 1914 to the end of World War II in 1945. Europe's period of progress and optimism was shattered by the "Great War" in 1914. Four years of violence created the crucible out of which the monster of fascism arose. This led to an even larger war only twenty years later. During WWII, mass slaughter became commonplace, from the Nazi Holocaust to the Allies' strategic bombing campaigns, which targeted civilian populations. Using a variety of sources, the course examines the big picture of great power confrontations, but also how the wars were experienced by individuals.

D. Literature (3 credits)

One of the following:

E172 Readers and Writers (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with works of "self-referential" literature, i.e., literary works that reflect upon their own status as literature while also performing their other functions as a story, poem, or play.  For example, we read a novel that not only tells a story but that also reflects on the act of storytelling and how storytelling shapes meaning in our lives and in our culture.  Studying such literary works allows students not only to practice traditional conventions of reading, such as textual analysis, interpretation and critical thinking, but also encourages a deeper reflection on the act of reading itself and its role in shaping who we are.  The literature in the class thus becomes not only the source of the answers to literary questions (what does this poem mean?) but also the source of important questions about literature and culture (how does literature make meaning?  Why should one read?  What is the effect of reading?).

E179 Fantasy Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with popular and influential works of fantasy fiction and to increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. With a particular focus on the ways in which fantasy authors build fictive worlds that challenge us to reevaluate the familiar and the magical, reinterpret ourselves and others, and reimagine the world around us, students will identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E326 Short Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Through the reading of short stories, guided instruction and writing workshops, students in Short Fiction Writing study the genre of the short story and produce several examples of their own literary short fiction for an audience. In addition to composing original works that reveal their own artistic vision, students are expected to become informed of the literary tradition of the short story and provide critical and theoretical reflections on their work as well as the writing of other students and of published authors.

E333 Shakespeare (3 cr.)

This course focuses on a representative group of Shakespeare's sonnets, comedies, histories, and tragedies. Emphasis is placed on close reading of the plays, with the intention of exploring some of Shakespeare's most pressing issues, including love, nature, death, dreams, relationships between parents and children, gender roles, freedom of the will, and reality itself. The course also address the cultural milieu out of which the texts were generated; the meaning of the terms "comedy", "history", and "tragedy"; and the relationship of the written plays to modern adaptations.

LOND431 Modern British Literature (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to a representative selection of writers from the British Isles who have been active in the last 20 years. Lectures are given on their work as well as their literary and social background, and include selections of poetry, prose and drama.

E. Mathematics, Computer Science, and Natural Sciences (6-8 credits)

A laboratory experience must be completed.  The laboratory experience can be fulfilled either by taking a course with an attached laboratory, or by taking the laboratory experience separately.

Two of the following:

B300 Current Scientific Issues (3 cr.)

This course addresses current scientific issues of interest to the general public, ranging from modern medical advances to those affecting the environment. Stress is placed not only on the concepts involved, but also on the social, ethical, political, and economic aspects of these issues. The course is intended for non-science majors.

B350 Heredity and Society (3 cr.)

This course includes in-depth coverage and discussion emphasizing how the main principles of genetics and heredity relate to contemporary social issues. The biology behind these main principles of genetics and heredity are examined. Topics may include genetic inheritance, human reproduction, chromosomal abnormalities, genetic disorders, the genetic basis of behavior, genetic engineering, genetic screening, genetic counseling, and modern genetic techniques. The course meets for three one-hour lectures weekly and is open only to junior or senior students, or with consent of the instructor.

P113 Physics of Sound and Music (3 cr.)

This course is an exploration of the fundamental physical concepts relating to sound (vibrations and waves, overtones, Fourier synthesis and analysis) and its perception (physiology, physics, and psychophysics of hearing) and measurement (transducers and the decibel scale); sound recording and reproduction (analog and digital); musical acoustics (temperament and pitch; families of musical instruments; speech and the human vocal tract); and the acoustics of enclosures.

P123 Investigating the Universe (3 cr.)

This general education level course covers topics similar in nature to P121 Astronomy: The Stars and Beyond but in somewhat more depth and without the observational laboratory component. It focuses on three broad areas in astronomy and cosmology: gathering information about the universe (science and its methods; models of motion of celestial objects [including distance scales and gravitation]; light, spectra, and atomic structure); the nature of stars and galaxies (stellar formation, evolution, and death; the expanding universe); and cosmology (the Big Bang theories of the early universe).

P201 Introductory Physics I (3 cr.)

This course is the first half of a two-semester introductory, calculus-based, physics course for all students planning to enter one of the scientific professions. It covers the fundamental principles of mechanics, oscillations, and fluid mechanics.

P202 Introductory Physics I Laboratory (1 cr.)

One three-hour laboratory is held each week covering topics studied in the lectures. Taken concurrently with P201 Introductory Physics

F. Social Sciences (3 credits)

One of the following:

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

PY305 Learning and Cognition (4 cr.)

Learning and cognition engages students in learning principles and cognitive psychology. Using a historical perspective in psychology, students first examine classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning, including the ideas of Pavlov, Watson, Skinner, and Bandura. In the second half, the course focuses on the roles of perception, attention, and memory in the process of cognition.  Emphasis is placed on the students' abilities to critically analyze readings, research methodology, and research data, as well as to effectively communicate their ideas in writing.

S110 Sociological Imagination (3 cr.)

The nature and foundations of society and the individual, the main forces that strengthen and weaken social groups and the conditions that transform social life are examined in this course.

G. Arts and Communication (3 credits)

One of the following:

AR101 Art Appreciation (3 cr.)

Art Appreciation is intended for non-majors who want a better understanding of the role of visual art in our culture. A combination of lectures, slides, films and discussion are used to enable students to appreciate works of art. Topics include a study of the elements of art and the principles of design, two-dimensional and three-dimensional media, and an overview of the history of western art.

AR103 Art Foundations I (3 cr.)

Art Foundations I is a study of the principles and elements of two- and three-dimensional design. It is also an introduction to drawing, color theory, and painting for the professional. The course is conducted in a studio-lecture format.

AR122 Drawing I (3 cr.)

Drawing I requires no art background. Studio assignments include a variety of subject matter, media and techniques with emphasis on visual perception and awareness.

AR211 Ceramics I (3 cr.)

Ceramics I is an introductory course that combines instruction in hand building and the potter's wheel. The emphasis is placed on methods of construction, surface decoration, glazing, and firing techniques.

COM350 Multimedia Production (3 cr.)

Digital media - including podcasting, multimedia storytelling and editing, and other collaborative content creation platforms - are changing the fields of public relations and journalism.  Hiring managers in communications-related fields expect new college graduates to be "experts" in all multimedia platforms.  Those who can demonstrate true expertise, however, are rare due to lack of formal instruction and training.  This course narrows the focus from the broad field of digital media to cover the specific tools and best practices needed to conquer current and future use of multimedia production in public relations, journalism, electronic publishing, and related fields.

LOND301 Art in London (3 cr.)

(required for all London students) This course, required for all students participating in the London program, introduces students to the history of Western art. Lectures are supplemented by visits to the British Museum, the National Gallery, and the Tate. The primary course objective is to familiarize students with major periods of art (Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Modern), artists, historical eras and basic artistic technical terms.

MU150 Experiencing Music (3 cr.)

This course is designed to stimulate interest in and enjoyment of music from its beginnings through medieval, renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and 20th century styles, including various styles of non-Western music. This course is required for music majors and minors and is also a general education aesthetics content area course open to all students with an interest in music.

TA110 Introduction to Visual Communication for Theatre (3 cr.)

This course will provide the foundation for additional theatrical design courses. It is intended to introduce the student to the basic theories, practices, and functions of theatrical design and the roles of theatrical scenic, lighting, costume, and sound designers. The course will examine the elements of design, the principles of composition, and the design process from initial concept through finished design. In this class, students will create and analyze compositions in order to learn the processes and tools the designer uses to solve design problems and communicate these solutions to others visually. These tools are both conceptual (manipulating elements and principles of design) and physical (freehand drawing, figure drawing, model making, and painting).

TA160 Theatre Appreciation (3 cr.)

An introductory study of drama and theatre of the past and present, the course is designed for the student who has no previous background in theatre. The course is directed toward a greater appreciation and understanding of the theatre in our culture. (Not open to majors.)

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 Art in London satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA302 Modern Movies (3 cr.)

An introductory study of important contemporary films for students who wish to learn how to understand and evaluate popular cinema. Students are introduced to the history of film-making as well as basic film techniques. Movies are screened, discussed and evaluated in terms of content, style and intent. Students have the opportunity to react and formulate their own aesthetic preferences through a series of written and oral responses to the films. This course satisfies an Aesthetic general education requirement.

TA360 London Page to the Stage (3 cr.)

This course explores the transfer of dramatic literature from the page to the stage. Prior to attending a London production, students analyze and interpret a given text and discuss its possible production requirements. After viewing the production students assess it based on their pre-production analysis and interpretation.

Overview

This interdisciplinary minor helps students explore the various meanings of "environment", "sustainability", and "environmental sustainability" from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.  It thereby fosters an understanding of the interconnectedness between living things and the environments they inhabit; between human endeavors and changes in the non-human world; and between different ways of knowing, describing, and experiencing the world around us.  It ask students to consider the values that inform both humans' interaction with, and appreciation of, the environment, and their desire to preserve certain aspects of it, exploit others, and sustain complex relationships with it.  Different courses encourage them to consider and articulate their own position and commitments when considering environmental sustainability, as well as to consider possible actions in response to a commitment to environmental sustainability.

Of the disciplinary distribution required for graduation, at least 18 credits must be taken from the following list of courses to complete this Minor.  No more than 9 credits from lower-division courses can contribute to the minor.

The following courses contribute to the Environmental Sustainability Minor:

A. Theology (3 credits)

TH260 Foundations in Catholic Theology (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Catholic theology that explores fundamental tenets, e.g., the Triune God, the creation of the cosmos and humanity, sin, grace, salvation, revelation, sanctification, and sacramental imagination. Students attend to the development of these creedal doctrines building on their biblical understanding of how these doctrines frame the human experience through a coherent system of thought, which addresses the challenges that modernity and post-modernity pose to the Christian world view. Students who have taken TH209 Methods in Catholic Theology should not take this course.

B. Philosophy (3 credits)

One of the following:

PH346 Ethical Issues in the Sciences (3 cr.)

This course provides non-science as well as science majors the opportunity to examine key issues in the sciences in the light of major ethical theories. Among the issues to be examined are: abuses and uses of nuclear energy, behavior control and psychosurgery, chemical wastes and the environment, computerized files of personal information, computerization and depersonalization, experimentation with human subjects and animals, genetic engineering and screening, reproductive techniques, organ transplants, physician-patient relationships, and euthanasia.

PH362 Business Ethics (3 cr.)

The course examines critically the major ethical or moral theories that are at the basis of decision making in the complex area of contemporary behavior we know as "the business world." It is recommended for business majors.

C. History (3 credits)

One of the following:

H111 Global History to 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to world history from the origins of civilization to 1500. The course focuses on the societies and cultures of Eurasia: Southwest Asia (the Middle East), India, Persia, China, Greece and Rome, Europe, and Africa, and the Americas. Major themes include the founding and development of the world's great religions; political ideas, institutions and practices; law and legal institutions; society and economy; war, conquest and empire; the encounters between cultures; and the richness and diversity of human experience and aspiration in the foundational eras of the world's civilizations. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H113 U.S. History to 1865 (3 cr.)

This course offers an introductory survey of the multicultural history of the United States from the earliest human settlement around 13,000 B.C. to the end of the Civil War in 1865. It introduces students to the diversity of peoples that came to inhabit North America, such as Native Americans, early colonizers from a variety of European nations, slaves from Africa, and the various waves of immigrants that enriched the American population prior to the Civil War. It introduces students to the various historical periods historians recognize, such as the pre-Columbian era, the Colonial period, the era of the American Revolution, the Early Republic, antebellum America, and the era of sectional conflict and the Civil War. The course also introduces students to many of the people, voices, ideas, beliefs, events, and larger historical developments that shaped American history. And it emphasizes the tension that has existed throughout American history between, on the one hand, the forces that work to create a single, unified country out of this multiplicity of cultures, and, on the other hand, the forces that threaten to undermine and tear apart the great republican experiment that is the United States.

H317 History of Latin America (3 cr.)

The History of Latin America provides a historical overview of Latin America—broadly defined to include relevant parts of the Caribbean and French America—from the Spanish, Portuguese, and French conquests to the present day. The course pays attention to the following: the role of Indians and Africans in shaping Latin American societies; the conquest of Latin America; sugar and slavery; the role of the Catholic Church and other religions in Latin American cultures; Spanish and Portuguese administration; the independence movements of the nineteenth century; the revolutionary movements and military dictatorships of the twentieth century; Latin America's relationship with the United States and other world powers; liberation theology; and soccer, music, literature, and other expressions of Latin American culture.

H335 American Environmental History (3 cr.)

The course introduces students to environmental history as an academic discipline and teaches American history through the lens of that discipline. It emphasizes the reciprocal and symbiotic relationship between human beings that historically have occupied North America and their surroundings—the natural environment as these human beings encountered and transformed them. As such, the course introduces students to the various strands in environmental thought, environmental science, environmental practices, religious belief as it pertains to the relationship between human beings and the environment, and environmental politics that have shaped the history of North America and the United States. The course also familiarizes students with the practices of historiography and the specific historiography of environmental history.

H366 Industrialization and Its Discontents: Europe, 1750-1914 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the history of Europe during its explosive period of modernization, beginning with two concurrent world-changing events — the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Using a variety of sources, including works by historians but also primary sources ranging from manifestos and letters to plays and novels, students investigate the ideas and movements which emerged from this "dual revolution" to change the world, including imperialism, liberalism, socialism, feminism, and nationalism.

D. Literature (3 credits)

One of the following:

E170 Romance Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with popular works of romance literature and to increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. Through study of early romance tales but especially recent variations on the romance in books and film, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes (such as journey, adventure, the psychological development of the hero, and encounters with the supernatural), read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E303 Imagining Nature in Early American Literature (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the relationship between the American literary imagination and nature. It examines how early American romantic, naturalistic, and modernist authors have imaginatively perceived the relationship between nature and humanity. Students read and discuss American literary texts that embody a variety of perspectives on this relationship, leading to a deeper understanding of this pervasive cultural theme.

E383 Geographies of Identity (3 cr.)

A study of selected works from non-Anglo- American cultural traditions. Students in this course explore literature from around the world with a focus on how identities, perspectives, and values are shaped by geographical and cultural circumstances. We look particularly at literary dialogues and confrontations between the Western European tradition and writers from other cultures, especially Russian and African, from the 19th century to today.

SP332 Civilization/Culture Latin America (3 cr.)

This course is an initiation to the diversity of the Hispanic world. Through a series of texts and videos the students address several important social, political, and cultural themes.

SP414 Themes in Latin American Cinema (3 cr.)

This course offers an introduction to the academic study of film as a form of art.  Through a study of the film viewing and writing process, students learn how to express themselves clearly and creatively using a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language. 

E. Mathematics, Computer Science, and Natural Sciences (6 credits)

A laboratory experience must be completed.  The laboratory experience can be fulfilled either by taking a course with an attached laboratory, or by taking the laboratory experience separately.

Two of the following:

B105 Environmental Biology with Laboratory (3 cr.)

The human position in the biological world and responsibility for living in reasonable harmony with the environs is the focus of this course. Beginning with an overview of major ecological principles governing all ecosystems, consideration is then given to such problems as population expansion, natural resources, pollution, conservation and environmental health.

B320 Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

This course introduces key concepts in conservation biology with an emphasis on biodiversity.  Both theory and practical applications in conservation biology will be explored.  Concepts explored include definitions and locations of biodiversity, the valuation of biodiversity, threats to biodiversity, conservation at the species and population levels, and how conservation biology intersects with current issues facing human societies.  This course will take a global perspective on issues current in the field of conservation biology.  Additionally, the development of scientific literacy skills will be heavily emphasized.

C142 General Chemistry II (3 cr.)

This course includes the study of the chemistry of molecular forces, redox reactions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium theory, electrochemistry, chemical dynamics, organic chemistry, phase behavior and solution chemistry.

C144 General Chemistry II Laboratory (1 cr.)

This laboratory is an inquiry-based approach to understanding the process of doing chemistry. Each week, as a team member with a specific role working for a consulting company, the student receives a letter from a "chemical client" requesting the solution to a chemical problem. It is the responsibility of the team to design a solution, collect data, and report the results to the client in report form.

C341 Quantitative Chemical Analysis with Laboratory (4 cr.)

This course introduces the student to the methods of quantitative analysis. Topics include: measurement uncertainty, statistical analysis of data, aqueous solution equilibria, titrimetry, electrochemistry, molecular spectroscopy (UV-visible and fluorescence), and chromatography.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

P221 Global Climate Change (3 cr.)

This course first examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in the global climate change debate. We will ask ourselves what is the current data, make predictions on local areas in which we live, and propose possible solutions. The course design is problem-based. That is, students will actively participate in discovering relevant questions, data, underlying scientific principles, and solutions. As a result details of possible topics can be a little bit fluid, but possible topics include: Current climate data and controversies; Basic climate science; Data and predictions on local area; Biological, sociological and economic impact; Possible solutions. We hope to bring to the foreground the processes scientists use to draw conclusions about the physical nature of climate, building an understanding of the nature of explanation in science, and investigating how science interacts with society in general.

F. Social Sciences (3 credits)

One of the following:

GE305 Introduction to Geography (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of geography, with special emphasis on linking geography's basic concepts to the realms and major regions of the world.

PY310 Social Psychology (3 cr.)

Social psychology is the scientific study of how we perceive people and social events as well as how we influence and relate to one another. Areas covered include social cognition; prejudice, discrimination and stereotyping; the self; interpersonal attraction and close relationships; helping; aggression; attitudes and persuasion; conformity, compliance and obedience. Applications of social psychology to academics, the workplace, the media, and social relations are examined.

S406 Environmental Sociology (3 cr.)

This seminar course examines the enduring conflict that exists between the biophysical realm and humanly produced environments. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the social construction of environmental problems, the treadmill of production and nature, rationalization and environmental problems, and environmental justice.

G. Arts and Communication (3 credits)

One of the following:

AR211 Ceramics I (3 cr.)

Ceramics I is an introductory course that combines instruction in hand building and the potter's wheel. The emphasis is placed on methods of construction, surface decoration, glazing, and firing techniques.

COM270 Persuasion and Advocacy (3 cr.)

This course investigates seminal and current persuasive theories as a means to create change within a workplace, community, or world.  It puts into practice being a "voice for the voiceless".  Students will apply theories to create a strategic communication plan with the use of interpersonal, public, organizational, and social media tactics to be an advocate for social justice.  Students will also learn to recognize strategies used to influence their own thought processes and actions.

Overview

This interdisciplinary minor examines the diversity of human and other life systems across a variety of cultural and intercultural contexts, including political, social, economic, and scientific ways of knowing that determine and apply definitions of justice.  Students will explore biodiversity and human systems of classifying scientific constructs and investigate the development and maintenance of systems of political and economic power that govern communities.  Other disciplinary courses will interrogate narratives that reflect how communities express the intersections of power and identity, and examine communications within and across cultural and interpersonal relationships.  The minor invites students to pose and answer questions of social justice that emerge from studies of these systems.

Of the disciplinary distribution required for graduation, at least 18 credits must be taken from the following list of courses to complete this Minor.  No more than 9 credits from lower-division courses can contribute to the minor.

The following courses contribute to the Global Diversity and Social Justice Minor:

A. Theology (3 credits)

TH250 Christian View of the Human Person (3 cr.)

This course explores the set of Catholic Christian doctrines and interpretation surrounding the question "what does it mean to be a human person?" for example, the creation to the image of God, sin, redemption, sacramentality, and vocation. There is a focus on modern questions of the mind, conscience, embodiment, gender, and sexuality.

B. Philosophy (3 credits)

One of the following:

PH362 Business Ethics (3 cr.)

The course examines critically the major ethical or moral theories that are at the basis of decision making in the complex area of contemporary behavior we know as "the business world." It is recommended for business majors.

PH385 Political Philosophy (3 cr.)

This course examines some of the core concepts and presuppositions involved in decisions to be made by citizens and governments, especially in relation to issues of equity and justice.

C. History (3 credits)

One of the following:

H114 U.S. History since 1865 (3 cr.)

This course offers an overview of the history of the United States between the end of the Civil War and the present day.  It emphasizes broad developments that transformed American life:  the transformation of a rural-agrarian into an urban-industrial society; the shift from "isolationism" to internationalism; the rise of liberalism, the growth of the federal government, and the development of the military-industrial complex; the rise of a conservative movement and the subsequent polarization of American politics and life, especially as seen in the Cultural Wars; and the ubiquitous role technology played in these developments.  In addition, the course looks at these transformations through the lenses of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, and class, in order to investigate how these broad developments affected people in an increasingly diverse nation.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

H305 Race, Slavery, and Revolution in the Atlantic World (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the exchange of goods, people, and ideas between Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1900, with special emphasis on ideas about race and the social structures they engendered, the triangular trade in the Atlantic basin, the transatlantic slave trade, slave rebellions, and the political revolutions and religious upheavals that transformed many slave societies and ultimately ended plantation slavery in the Atlantic World. The course also pays attention to race and slavery prior to the transatlantic slave trade, the racial dimensions of national independence movements, the trans-Saharan slave trade to northern Africa, abolitionist movements, and the diverse cultures of the black diaspora.

H317 History of Latin America (3 cr.)

The History of Latin America provides a historical overview of Latin America—broadly defined to include relevant parts of the Caribbean and French America—from the Spanish, Portuguese, and French conquests to the present day. The course pays attention to the following: the role of Indians and Africans in shaping Latin American societies; the conquest of Latin America; sugar and slavery; the role of the Catholic Church and other religions in Latin American cultures; Spanish and Portuguese administration; the independence movements of the nineteenth century; the revolutionary movements and military dictatorships of the twentieth century; Latin America's relationship with the United States and other world powers; liberation theology; and soccer, music, literature, and other expressions of Latin American culture.

H319 The History of the Palestinian- Israeli Conflict (3 cr.)

This course begins with a brief historical examination of the period from Abraham, whose "many sons" include both the Jews and the Arabs, through the Ottoman collapse and Mandatory Period to World War II.  The chronology then slows and focuses primarily on the developments in the Middle East that have led to the current Palestinian-Israeli conflict.  Underlying this chronological structure, specific themes will be emphasized in each class, along with overarching themes like the roles of nationalism, religion, and victimhood narratives.

H357 The History of Rock and Roll (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the rise, development, and sociocultural impact of rock and roll, broadly defined to include soul, rhythm and blues, punk, reggae, country, hip hop, heavy metal, and other genres that have become essential parts of American popular culture. Through critical analysis of the texts, images, sounds, business practices, and media machinery of rock culture, as well as of rock and roll's profound impact on television, fashion, race relations, gender relations, advertising, and politics students gain an understanding of the functions of popular art and culture in the political, social, and economic life of the United States. The course challenges students to critically examine primary source materials and secondary readings about topics such as the southern roots of rock music, postwar youth culture, race and racism, class, gender and sexuality, technology and mass media, the culture wars, and rock music as an American export, and thereby come to a greater understanding of the development and interaction of modern and postmodern culture.

H367 Europe in the Era of World War 1914–1945 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Europe's "thirty year crisis," from the outbreak of World War I in 1914 to the end of World War II in 1945. Europe's period of progress and optimism was shattered by the "Great War" in 1914. Four years of violence created the crucible out of which the monster of fascism arose. This led to an even larger war only twenty years later. During WWII, mass slaughter became commonplace, from the Nazi Holocaust to the Allies' strategic bombing campaigns, which targeted civilian populations. Using a variety of sources, the course examines the big picture of great power confrontations, but also how the wars were experienced by individuals.

D. Literature (3 credits)

One of the following:

E176 The Graphic Novel (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to fiction within the graphic novel genre and increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. With a close, critical focus on the relationship between text and image, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes in fiction, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E177 Holocaust Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to popular works of Holocaust fiction and increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. By evaluating Holocaust fiction closely and critically, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E373 Post-Colonial Fictions (3 cr.)

This course focuses on literature in English that addresses colonization and decolonization. The course considers how postcolonial texts present the legacy of imperialism; how postcolonial writers inscribe their perspectives, politics, and lived experiences in literature; and how various fictional accounts (of origin, of colonization, of identity, of nationality) contribute to a contemporary understanding of community, history, and narrative.

E391 African American Perspectives (3 cr.)

African American Literature studies the literary works of major authors of African American heritage. Students examine poetry, fiction, and autobiographical narrative, as well as engage critical race theory that seeks to situate writers of color and their relationship to the American literary tradition. This course considers African American literature as integral to the American literary canon, and readings allow students to see the ways in which African American writers have contributed to, been influenced by, and transformed American culture.

SP403 Latin American Literature through the 18th Century (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of Latin America from the colonial period through the 18th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP404 19th–20th Century Latin American Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the major authors and literary works of modern Latin America. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are studied in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP414 Themes in Latin American Cinema (3 cr.)

This course offers an introduction to the academic study of film as a form of art.  Through a study of the film viewing and writing process, students learn how to express themselves clearly and creatively using a more sophisticated and idiomatic use of the Spanish language. 

E. Mathematics, Computer Science, and Natural Sciences (6 credits)

A laboratory experience must be completed.  The laboratory experience can be fulfilled either by taking a course with an attached laboratory, or by taking the laboratory experience separately.

Two of the following:

B300 Current Scientific Issues (3 cr.)

This course addresses current scientific issues of interest to the general public, ranging from modern medical advances to those affecting the environment. Stress is placed not only on the concepts involved, but also on the social, ethical, political, and economic aspects of these issues. The course is intended for non-science majors.

B320 Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

This course introduces key concepts in conservation biology with an emphasis on biodiversity.  Both theory and practical applications in conservation biology will be explored.  Concepts explored include definitions and locations of biodiversity, the valuation of biodiversity, threats to biodiversity, conservation at the species and population levels, and how conservation biology intersects with current issues facing human societies.  This course will take a global perspective on issues current in the field of conservation biology.  Additionally, the development of scientific literacy skills will be heavily emphasized.

F. Social Sciences (3 credits)

One of the following:

CJ352 Drugs in American Society (3 cr.)

The primary objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive survey of the use and/or abuse of drugs in the United States and their impact on the criminal justice system. Special attention is given to the historical and sociological contexts in which drug laws have evolved and the implication of those laws on drug prevention policies.

HS111 Introduction to Human Services (3 cr.)

Students trace the development of human services as a profession, identify employment options for human services professionals, and examine the various social problems to which human services professionals respond, including but not limited to child abuse, domestic violence, homelessness, immigration, mental illness, needs of the frail elderly, and substance abuse.

LOND329 British Politics (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to British politics. Topics include British institutions: parties and politics; 1945 to the present day; power and personalities: MacMillan, on-going problems; and influence of the media.

PS102 American National Government (3 cr.)

A basic course on the nature and purpose of our U.S. political system; includes the Constitution, institutions, processes and persons that combine to form our federal government. The student is exposed to a variety of approaches to political study.

PS317 International Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines the basic structures of the international system including: 1) states, nations, transnationals, international organizations, diplomacy, etc.; 2) global issues including: war/peace, deterrence, arms control, political economy, trade, human rights, peacekeeping, etc.; and, 3) global ideas: sovereignty, nationalism, modernization, etc. This course deals extensively with the contemporary international system and the issues arising from the limitations of power in international affairs. Students apply this knowledge in a United Nations simulation.

PS320 Comparative Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines how different types of countries, i.e., established democracies, transitioning nations, and nondemocracies, are governed. The course examines first the broader trends and concepts about political systems and then engages in more in-depth case studies on a number of countries representing different regions, colonial and postcolonial experiences, levels of economic development, and government types.

PY270 Multicultural Psychology: Understanding our Diverse Communities (3 cr.)

This course examines culture's influence on human behavior with particular emphasis on multiculturism in a global Lasallian context. Primary significance is on bridging core values of Lasallian heritages and mission with traditional and contemporary theories in cross-cultural psychology. Particular attention is devoted to discovering how the contributions of Saint John Baptist de La Salle can be utilized to enhance our understanding of teaching and learning and the ways that culture impacts the dynamic interplay among family, friendship, emotions, language, education, spirituality and personality.

PY341 Health Psychology (3 cr.)

Health psychology examines theories pertaining to the relationship between health cognitions and behaviors, with special emphasis on the physiological impact of psychological processes such as stress.  It will explore both the biological and psychological components of health, focusing on classic theories and current research to foster an understanding of factors that contribute to physical and mental health and illness.

G. Arts and Communication (3 credits)

One of the following:

COM111 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 cr.)

A study of the history, production methods, and social and economic factors of the mass media. This course gives students an understanding of print media, broadcast media and public relations by analyzing the technical development and social impact of media.

COM250 Intercultural Communication (3 cr.)

The Intercultural Communication course is an introduction to approaching communication across cultural differences.  It is designed to explore the impact of culture on communication and to improve each student's ability to communicate with others, both formally and informally.  We live in an era of rapid globalization in which being able to communicate across cultures is imperative to our ability to function in a diverse workplace, city, and world.  In this class, culture is defined broadly to include race, ethnicity, gender, age, socio-economic class, and so on.  Students enrolled in this course are encouraged to examine their own lives and the influence of their backgrounds on their communication processes.  It involves both individual and group work.  Class time consists of lectures, group activities, simulations, written exercises, service learning, presentations, and discussions.  Students will gain theoretical and practical knowledge as they study and mindfully experience intercultural communication.

COM331 Public Affairs Journalism (3 cr.)

An examination of units of local and state government and their coverage in the news media; projects designed to familiarize students with the workings of governmental and quasi-governmental agencies.

LOND301 Art in London (3 cr.)

(required for all London students) This course, required for all students participating in the London program, introduces students to the history of Western art. Lectures are supplemented by visits to the British Museum, the National Gallery, and the Tate. The primary course objective is to familiarize students with major periods of art (Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque and Modern), artists, historical eras and basic artistic technical terms.

TA301 Theatre in London (3 cr.)

This course is offered during the London semester and is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of British theatre. The class attends at least eight performances throughout the semester, each one relating to some aspect of British theatre. This course taken with LOND301 Art in London satisfies Artscore and Aesthetic general education content areas.

TA302 Modern Movies (3 cr.)

An introductory study of important contemporary films for students who wish to learn how to understand and evaluate popular cinema. Students are introduced to the history of film-making as well as basic film techniques. Movies are screened, discussed and evaluated in terms of content, style and intent. Students have the opportunity to react and formulate their own aesthetic preferences through a series of written and oral responses to the films. This course satisfies an Aesthetic general education requirement.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages and European Renaissance.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries from the English Restoration through European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

Overview

The Lasallian Honors Program, for those students whose record of academic accomplishment earns them an invitation into the Program upon applying to the university, is designed around seven core interdisciplinary seminars that incorporate as their defining practice the exercise of shared inquiry, a mode of learning in which the students and teacher explore together the significance and implication of foundational texts throughout history.  The Program uses a cohort model of learning such that all students in the Program take the same series of classes together throughout their collegiate career.  By emphasizing foundational texts, shared inquiry, interdisciplinary study, and service learning, students in the cohort gain significant skills in speaking, writing, and critical thinking while preparing for successful careers and future lives engaged in servant leadership.

A. Lasallian Honors First Year Experience

All of the following:

LH110 Foundations (4 cr.)

As the first course in the Lasallian Honors Program at Saint Mary's University, Foundations introduces students, through the close reading of foundational texts, to the critical skills necessary for success at university and in the Honors Program, to the communities (both local and national) of which they will be a part, and to the origins of significant intellectual and cultural traditions throughout history.  It fosters inquiry into the cultural conditions, literary expressions or epistemological assumptions that inhere in texts and events from both the past and the present moment and asks students to reflect on how parallel conditions and assumptions might shape their own world and worldview.  As part of the introduction to the Saint Mary's community, students also participate in university first year experience activities and attend and reflect on campus artistic events.
 

QR101 Quantitative Reasoning (3 cr.)

This course contributes to the First Year Experience by helping students become more quantitatively literate through providing them opportunities for making decisions, reasoning from evidence and communicating results.  Quantitative Reasoning incorporates the common themes of Place, Purpose and Well Being through problem solving, introspection, civil discourse and environmental sustainability.

TH111 Thinking Theologically (3 cr.)

This course introduces first year college students to the methods and practices of thinking theologically through an examination of some of the major questions people have asked and found answer to within religious contexts, especially the Judeo-Christian narrative.  This course pays particular attention to the human experience of suffering, and how those different experiences shape our theological questions, both past and present.  The course also embeds how theology is examined at a university defined by multidisciplinary approaches to truth and knowledge.

B. Lasallian Honors Program Minor

All of the following:

LH160 Encounters (4 cr.)

After studying the foundational nature of particular moments or worldviews in the first course in the Honors Program, students in Encounters consider the challenges and promise of intellectual and cultural exchange.  The course will consider those narratives, texts and/or historical moments when one way of knowing confronts another, whether that be individually, collectively, or intellectually.  It will explore the promise and the threat that such collisions engender and ask students to reflect on their own identity as it relates to alternative cultures, beliefs or practices.

 

Honors Students must also complete a Theology course and a Quantitative Reasoning course in their freshmen year.

LH210 Community (4 cr.)

In the third course of the Honors Program, students will consider the concept of community and in particular the ethical considerations and obligations that arise in the creation of and participation in a given community.  How do communities form?  What defines them?  What are our obligations in each of them?  What is the relationship between the community and the individual or one community and another?  The course includes a service learning component as a way to raise questions about one's role in various communities, and in the process the course considers specifically Christian and Catholic conceptions of and responsibility towards the communities in which and with which we live.

LH260 Justice (4 cr.)

The fourth course in the Honors Program continues the consideration of ethical concepts and questions introduced in LH210 Community by interrogating the concept of justice.  What defines justice?  What does it mean for an individual?  What does it mean for a community?  What does it mean in a theological or religious context?  How do such definitions affect how one acts in the world?  A service learning component continued from the first semester serves as a context in which students can consider through lived experience the ethical challenges to achieving justice both locally and globally.

LH310 Ways of Seeing (4 cr.)

In this course students will consider various ways that artists have expressed their vision of the world.  Some questions the course will consider include: what are the nature, sources and purpose of that vision?  What forms have people adopted to share that vision?  What is the relationship between what is seen and how it is shared?  What is the relationship between the individual vision and the cultural condition in which it emerged?  What assumptions and problems come with a particular way of seeing or expressing that sight?  The central question might be phrased thus: how do we say what we see?

LH360 Ways of Knowing (4 cr.)

In this course students will pursue questions considering how one knows the world—in effect, questions of epistemology or truth.  Topics will include the history and philosophy of science, the concept of history and historical thinking, and the relationship of faith and reason and/or the concept of divine revelation.  Students will test and compare the assumptions and methodologies inherent in various ways of knowing and disciplinary practices.

LH410 The Modern Condition (4 cr.)

This course considers significant thinkers and texts from the later modern era to reflect on the condition we call modernity and its implications for the ethical challenges that confront us today.  As part of the class, the final course in the Program, students will construct a reflection piece considering their learning in the Honors Program as well as a project that addresses the ethical context of a contemporary situation, whether local or global.

C. Additional IGEP requirements

All of the following:

One Approved Science course with a lab, for non-science majors

Two Wellness Physical Education/Lifestyle courses 

Overview

This minor examines the ways in which human individuals and societies have negotiated and defined the boundaries of self, other, the natural world, and the sacred.  Courses within this minor focus on themes of identity, personhood, human dignity, and spirituality as well as the ways in which changing systems and worldviews force humanity to renegotiate its understandings of how these categories relate.  The combination of courses included in this minor also helps students develop their understanding of and relationship to various "others", defined in a variety of ways (e.g. gender, sexuality, belief, species, world, and divinity).  The minor's driving logic is to give students an opportunity to situate themselves in relation to that which may or may not be outside them.  This will provide students the skills, dispositions, and knowledge to "live where they are."

Of the disciplinary distribution required for graduation, at least 18 credits must be taken from the following list of courses to complete this Minor.  No more than 9 credits from lower-division courses can contribute to the minor.

The following courses contribute to the Self, Society, and the Sacred Minor:

A. Theology (3 credits)

TH250 Christian View of the Human Person (3 cr.)

This course explores the set of Catholic Christian doctrines and interpretation surrounding the question "what does it mean to be a human person?" for example, the creation to the image of God, sin, redemption, sacramentality, and vocation. There is a focus on modern questions of the mind, conscience, embodiment, gender, and sexuality.

B. Philosophy (3 credits)

One of the following:

PH345 Philosophy of the Person (3 cr.)

This course critically examines some of the most influential conceptions of the human person (e.g., the Platonic, the Aristotelian–Thomistic, the Judeo–Christian, the Hobbesian and that of other modern thinkers). It considers such fundamental issues as the existence and nature of the human soul; whether human beings are innately good, innately evil, both or neither; in what sense, if any, human beings are rational; and the nature and basis of human freedom.

PH489 Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.)

This course engages students in a dialogue regarding the nature of existence, social constructs vs. inherent human capacities in the context of the question of what it is to live well, and explore our spiritual nature.

C. History (3 credits)

One of the following:

H111 Global History to 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to world history from the origins of civilization to 1500. The course focuses on the societies and cultures of Eurasia: Southwest Asia (the Middle East), India, Persia, China, Greece and Rome, Europe, and Africa, and the Americas. Major themes include the founding and development of the world's great religions; political ideas, institutions and practices; law and legal institutions; society and economy; war, conquest and empire; the encounters between cultures; and the richness and diversity of human experience and aspiration in the foundational eras of the world's civilizations. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

H151 American History for Education Majors (3 cr.)

This course serves as an overview of American history for elementary education majors. It is organized around the social studies standard defined by the Minnesota Department of Education, and as such stresses, in the context of United States and Minnesota history, (1) concepts of the ways human beings view themselves in and over time, and (2) concepts of people, places, and environments. The course pays special attention to the various periods into which historians divide American history; the racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural diversity that has marked American society throughout its history; the creation and development of the United States' political and economic institutions; the role the United States has played in the world; and the ways in which changing interpretations of their own history has shaped Americans' understanding of their identity.

H308 From the Constitution to the Civil War (3 cr.)

The writing and ratification of the Constitution are among the United States' proudest historical achievements, while the American Civil War was the Constitution's greatest test. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the developments and debates that led to the writing and ratification of the Constitution, the developments of the early national and antebellum periods that fostered greater unity among Americans, and the divisive issues and developments of the 1850s and 1860s that tore the nation apart yet ultimately affirmed the national unity envisioned by the Constitution. The course covers a diversity of social, political, cultural, intellectual and economic topics from the period between 1783 and 1865, such as the development of state constitutions, the development and spread of slavery, the market revolution, the growth of democracy, westward expansion and the removal of Native Americans, early reform movements, growing sectional conflict, and the Civil War. In addition to a broad understanding of the major topics of this period, students gain insight into both the methods historians use to interpret the past and the historiography that surrounds this vital period.

D. Literature (3 credits)

One of the following:

E171 Sports Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to engage students with the popular genre of sports literature. Through examining representations of athletes, the myths that surround sports, and the ways sports narratives reveal and influence our culture, students will identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E178 Gothic Literature (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint students with popular works of gothic literature and to increase students' appreciation of the experience of reading. Through study of some seminal texts that helped establish the modern concept of Gothic, and attention especially to contemporary ghost, monster, and other eerie books and film, students will learn to identify common conventions and themes, read texts closely and critically, and consider how the interpretation of literature contributes to a deeper understanding of language and culture.

E315 Christianity and Its Others (3 cr.)

In this course, students explore the advent and establishment of Christianity as the dominant mode of discourse in the Medieval and Early Modern periods of British Literature. This investigation hinges upon exposure to countercurrents which Christianity operated against as it established its primacy (such as paganism, Judaism, Islam), as well as to tensions within Christianity itself (heresies, humanism, patriarchy v. feminism, and the division between Catholicism and Protestantism). While the course thus is historical and cultural in its overall theme, the emphasis is on close reading and discussion of literary texts.

E390 Women's Narrative (3 cr.)

This course focuses on narrative strategies that are distinctive in literature by and/or about women and examine themes and issues that are common to women from a variety of social, historical, and/or political situations. In particular, the course examines how literature by and/or about women differs from literature by and/or about men, and how women writers inscribe their perspectives, politics, and lived experiences in literature.

SP401 Medieval/Renaissance Spanish Literature (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to major authors and literary works of Spain from the medieval period through the end of the 17th century. Literary movements, history, culture, and other artistic works are examined in their relation to the literary output of these periods.

SP405 Don Quijote (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, considered by many to be the first modern novel. This literary masterpiece, its author, its historical and social context, and other related works of the Spanish Golden Age will be studied in this class.

E. Mathematics, Computer Science, and Natural Sciences (6 credits)

A laboratory experience must be completed.  The laboratory experience can be fulfilled either by taking a course with an attached laboratory, or by taking the laboratory experience separately.

Two of the following:

B150 Biological Connections (3 cr. cr.)

Connections between living organisms and their internal and external environments are a foundational concept in biology.  This is a general biology course that explores introductory concepts in biology, with an emphasis on biological connections.  Biological interactions can occur at small and large scales, including interactions among molecules in the body, the interactions among individuals within a species, ecosystem-level interactions, and many others.  This course explores topics in cell biology, inheritance and reproduction, evolution and ecology, biological diversity, and body systems.  An emphasis will be placed on the relevance of these topics to our everyday lives, making connections between the discipline of biology and our human societies.

B350 Heredity and Society (3 cr.)

This course includes in-depth coverage and discussion emphasizing how the main principles of genetics and heredity relate to contemporary social issues. The biology behind these main principles of genetics and heredity are examined. Topics may include genetic inheritance, human reproduction, chromosomal abnormalities, genetic disorders, the genetic basis of behavior, genetic engineering, genetic screening, genetic counseling, and modern genetic techniques. The course meets for three one-hour lectures weekly and is open only to junior or senior students, or with consent of the instructor.

P111 The Earth and the Solar System (3 cr.)

This course examines physical, geological, and astronomical processes involved in shaping the Earth and other planets. The geological processes acting on the Earth and the natural history of the Earth are studied first, and then used to examine the other bodies of the solar system, studying how the physical characteristics of the planets influence and are influenced by the same basic processes operating in different ways. Topics include: the properties of Earth materials, the evolution of the Earth and geological structures, matter and energy in the Earth system, the Earth in the solar system and the universe, fundamental issues of planetary science, and fundamentals of observational astronomy and objects in the sky (moon phases, properties of orbits, etc.).

F. Social Sciences (3 credits)

One of the following:

CJ452 Victimology (3 cr.)

This course examines the multifaceted problem of criminal victimization. The historical and emerging roles of victimology as a field of study are examined and special attention is paid to the theoretical and policy aspects of the field.

HS111 Introduction to Human Services (3 cr.)

Students trace the development of human services as a profession, identify employment options for human services professionals, and examine the various social problems to which human services professionals respond, including but not limited to child abuse, domestic violence, homelessness, immigration, mental illness, needs of the frail elderly, and substance abuse.

PY111 General Psychology (3 cr.)

General Psychology provides an overview of the methods, fundamental principles, and major perspectives which define the discipline of psychology. Intrapersonal and/ or interpersonal psychological processes involved in the biological basis of behavior, sleeping and dreaming, conditioning and learning, cognition, lifespan human development, abnormal psychology, and psychological treatment. Classical and contemporary research and perspectives including the biological, cognitive, behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, sociocultural and evolutionary perspectives are explored. Students are actively involved through application, interactive exercises, simulations, and projects.

PY370 Personality Psychology (4 cr.)

Personality psychology examines the question, "What does it mean to be a person?" This course includes historical ways in which we have tried to understand human persons. Classical personality theories including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, trait and humanistic/existential are studied and evaluated. Contemporary research in personality areas such as attachment, temperament, the big five traits, and psychological well-being is studied and integrated with historical and classical approaches.

G. Arts and Communication (3 credits)

One of the following:

COM360 Ethical Communication and Leadership (3 cr.)

This course is designed for all students interested in increasing the effectiveness of the groups/teams with which they work and improving their interpersonal relationships.  Leadership, at its core, is about developing relationships and maintaining integrity.  This course will investigate the impact of ethical interpersonal and small group communication within an organization.  Topics covered will be: conversations as organizational cornerstones; emotional intelligence; ethical philosophies; small group theory; group roles, norms, and networks; dysfunctional group dynamics; gender considerations; problem solving; and ethical decision making.  This course will enable students to effectively lead groups in ethical decision making and team building processes.

TA322 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature to 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Middle Ages and European Renaissance.

TA323 Theatre History and Dramatic Literature since 1700 (3 cr.)

This course examines theatre within its historical context as a socially constructed mode of artistic and cultural expression. It explores theatre history and dramatic literature from the 18th – 21st centuries from the English Restoration through European and American modern and contemporary theatre, as well as emerging world theatres.

TA475 Dramatic Theory, Criticism, and Research (3 cr.)

The course covers the major concepts of modern and post-modern dramatic and performance theory. The course culminates with a theoretically informed and faculty mentored research essay in theatre studies. This course satisfies upper division writing skills area.

For Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors

If you are a sophomore, junior, or senior, you will continue through the pre-existing general education programming, which will enable you to graduate with a broad base of skills and knowledge that will ensure you are well-prepared to be a successful, engaged citizen of the world.

Over the course of your four years, Saint Mary’s will provide you with advanced skills in oral communications, writing, critical thinking, and problem solving. These valuable intellectual and applied skills will prepare you to become engaged, contributing, and visionary leaders in today’s changing world.

General Education Programs