Global Studies

Global Studies Minor

The global studies minor at Saint Mary’s focuses on global and cross-cultural issues, trends, and relations by applying the approaches of a variety of academic disciplines from the social sciences and humanities.

Global Studies Minor

Global studies minors find it supplements most any major in the liberal arts. A minor in global studies provides an essential foundation for understanding in our increasingly connected world.

Degree Requirements

A. All of the following:

AN300 Introduction to Anthropology (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of human culture. Topics: anthropology as an academic discipline, nature of human language, human culture, history of anthropological thought, and human social organizations.

GE305 Introduction to Geography (3 cr.)

A general introduction to the study of geography, with special emphasis on linking geography's basic concepts to the realms and major regions of the world.

H112 Global History since 1500 (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to global history since 1500. It focuses on the development of the major societies of Europe, the Americas, Africa and Asia and also on the interactions between these societies, including trade, colonization, biological exchange, migration, the spread of technology, world war and genocide. The course also is an introduction to the discipline of history and to the skills of critical reading, critical analysis, and effective communication.

PS317 International Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines the basic structures of the international system including: 1) states, nations, transnationals, international organizations, diplomacy, etc.; 2) global issues including: war/peace, deterrence, arms control, political economy, trade, human rights, peacekeeping, etc.; and, 3) global ideas: sovereignty, nationalism, modernization, etc. This course deals extensively with the contemporary international system and the issues arising from the limitations of power in international affairs. Students apply this knowledge in a United Nations simulation.

PS320 Comparative Politics (3 cr.)

This course examines how different types of countries, i.e., established democracies, transitioning nations, and nondemocracies, are governed. The course examines first the broader trends and concepts about political systems and then engages in more in-depth case studies on a number of countries representing different regions, colonial and postcolonial experiences, levels of economic development, and government types.

B. One of the following:

BU215 Business Statistics (3 cr.)

Statistical techniques which are commonly used in all areas of business are studied. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression, and non-parametric statistics. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of each procedure and on communicating the results of statistical techniques to others.

ST132 Reasoning with Statistics (3 cr.)

This course is designed to develop student facility in the use of statistical methods and the understanding of statistical concepts. The course takes a practical approach based on statistical examples taken from everyday life. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. Appropriate technology is used to perform the calculations for many applications, and correspondingly an emphasis is placed on interpreting the results of statistical procedures.

Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215 Business Statistics, B392 Biostatistics, or ST232 Introduction to Statistics.

ST232 Introduction to Statistics (2 cr.)

This course is designed to provide the basic ideas and techniques of statistics. Topics include: descriptive and inferential statistics, an intuitive introduction to probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square tests, regression and correlation. This course makes significant use of appropriate technology. Topics in this course are treated at a higher mathematical level than they are treated in ST132 Reasoning with Statistics.

Credit is not granted for this course and any of the following: BU215 Business Statistics, B392 Biostatistics, or ST132 Reasoning with Statistics.

C. Language Requirement:

One year or equivalent of college-level modern language.