PsyD Graduates

Doctor of Psychology in Counseling Psychology

The Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) in Counseling Psychology program provides training for the professional practice of psychology. 

The Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota Psy.D. program is student-centered and is attentive to the needs of the adult learner, preparing students for careers as licensed professional psychologists. In addition to foundation courses, the curriculum allows students to focus their studies in areas consistent with their interests and professional goals. The program emphasizes and integrates ethical practice, service to diverse and underserved communities, and evidence-based practices. There is a strong emphasis on individualized mentoring throughout the program.

Accreditation

The Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology program at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). Accreditation information can be obtained from:

Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association
750 First Street NE
Washington, D.C. 20002-4242
Phone: 202-336-5979
TDD/TTY: 202-336-6123

Student Admissions, Outcomes and Other Data

From Start to Finish

  • You can earn your Doctor of Psychology in Counseling Psychology in five years.
  • The program includes four years of coursework and a practicum. It concludes with a year of a full-time pre-doctoral internship.

Apply Today

Applicants to the Psy.D. program are expected to submit the following standard application materials:

  • The online application
  • A $25 nonrefundable application fee
  • Official transcripts
  • Three letters of recommendation (the online application will request the name and contact information for three individuals; they will then be asked to submit a letter of recommendation on your behalf)
  • A current résumé and personal statement

Students seeking admission to the Doctorate in Counseling Psychology program must also:

  • Have a master's degree from a regionally accredited institution, for which the applicant maintained at least a 3.4 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. The master's degree must be in a mental health related area (i.e. psychology, marriage and family therapy, social work, counseling, nursing, or human development)
  • Have completed a clinical practicum of at least 300 hours
  • Demonstrate the language proficiency necessary for successful graduate coursework
  • Provide copies of professional licenses, certifications, and certificates of completion for any continuing education coursework used to fulfill admission requirements
  • Completed the following graduate courses within the last 10 years with a grade of "B" or better
    • Developmental psychology
    • Physiological psychology
    • Counseling skills
    • Statistics and/or quantitative research design
    • Psychological assessment
    • Psychopathology
    • Personality theory and/or theories of counseling
    • Techniques and skills in clinical interventions
    • Professional ethics

Coursework older than 10 years may be accepted if the applicant has maintained a professional license to practice in a related field (e.g. LPC, LMFT), which requires documentation of continuing education credits. Applicants may be required to complete missing coursework prior to enrolling in doctoral level coursework.

International Students

International applicants will also be required to submit to an English language proficiency exam (TOEFL, IELTS, or MELAB accepted) and a summary of course-by-course academic credential evaluation through World Education Services or Educational Credential Evaluators.

Admission Timeline

Applications are due by March 1 for students who wish to begin the program the following fall. Applications must be complete in order to be considered. After preliminary review of applications by the admission committee, selected applicants will be invited for an admission interview.

Applicants will be notified of an admission decision no later than April 15. Students admitted to the program will be asked to make a nonrefundable deposit to hold their place in the program. Selected applicants may be notified that they have been placed on a waiting list. Applications received after the March 1 deadline will be considered for the following fall only if there is still space available in the program.

Locations

This program is offered at our Twin Cities location.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

Scientific Foundations 20 cr.
Foundations of Professional Practice 35 cr.
Advanced Training for Professional Practice 12 cr.
Other Requirements 18 cr.
Total 85 cr.

Scientific Foundations: 20 cr.

PYD801 Historical Foundations of Psychology (2 cr.)

This course emphasizes understanding professional practice in historical and cultural context, and traces the development of collective understandings and assumptions about psychology since the 18th century. The development of major theories of personality and psychotherapy are considered in historical context. Historical developments in both theoretical and applied psychology are reviewed.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Develop a framework for understanding and integrating major theoretical perspectives on personality and psychotherapy.
  2. Organize information about major events and individuals in the history of all areas of psychology, showing relations between historical events and people.
  3. Evaluate the impact of historical and cultural context on the development of the theory and practice of psychotherapy.
  4. Describe the development of psychology as a profession, and to consider future trends and directions.
  5. Demonstrate critical analytic skills in reading psychological literature and in oral and written presentation on psychological topics.
     

PYD802 Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology (3 cr.)

This interdisciplinary course explores explanations of the human experience in terms of biological substrates. Topics covered include neural development over the lifespan, neural plasticity, genetic vulnerabilities, imbalance of neurotransmitters and hormones, and brain dysfunctions. This course also covers interactions of psychoactive drugs with the central nervous system and neurotransmitters to influence cognition, emotion, and behavioral processes. Emphasis is on psychiatric medication with the spectrum of psychiatric disorders and drugs of abuse. The biopsychosocial perspective is used to integrate and acknowledge the dynamic bidirectional relationships among the multiple causal factors that contribute to behavior and mental disorders.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Discuss with clients a proficient knowledge of neuroanatomy, neural plasticity, neuron, gilal, and synaptic physiology.
  2. Explain the neurobiology of normal behavior and how disruptions of these neurobiological substrates lead to pathological stress and mental disorders.
  3.  Demonstrate knowledge of biological (pathophysiologic) mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of mental disorders.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the pharmacology of therapeutic drugs (e.g., pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics of drugs) associated with the treatment of the spectrum of Axis I and Axis II disorders and drugs of abuse.
  5. Analyze major theoretical issues and controversies surrounding the use of psychoactive drugs.
  6. Discuss professionally with the client and/or significant support persons how a particular drug treats a mental disorder, the clinical efficacy relative to the side effect profile, and treatment alternatives and combinations.
     

PYD803 Social and Organizational Psychology (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the exploration and evaluation of current developments in social psychology theory and research. Both basic and applied research is included. Emphasis is placed on utilizing social psychological concepts and principles to understand and solve challenges found in mental health and professional practice within culturally diverse settings. An overview of organizational development and change is also presented.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to use theories and concepts to diagnose the problem and develop possible solutions for prescribed assessment, treatment issues, and professional practice issues with special attention to cultural diversity issues.
  2. Critically evaluate social constructs and theoretical perspectives of social psychology's explanation of social interactions and the individual's role therein.
  3. Synthesize the implications of theory and research in the social psychological basis of behavior into practice.
  4. Identify and assess the significance of social influences at work in a variety of interactions on self and client thinking and behavior.
  5. Evaluate the different methodologies social psychologists use to research social issues.
  6. Apply the research on organizational psychology to a variety of organizations, communities, and situations.
  7. Integrate ethical parameters with organizational assessments and change principles.

PYD804 Cognitive - Affective Bases of Behavior (3 cr.)

This course focuses on current research and theory in cognitive and affective psychology and neuroscience. Topics include perception, attention, memory, problem solving, reasoning, language, and emotion. The interaction of both cognitive and affective processes is emphasized throughout. Applications of these processes to clinical assessment and intervention are discussed.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and evaluate current research on the cognitive and affective bases of behavior.
  2. Apply the principles of cognitive and affective bases of behavior to emotional development and vulnerability to disorders.
  3. Synthesize and articulate the implications of theory and research in cognitive neuroscience for clinical practice.
  4. Utilize cognitive and affective theories of behavior to understand the therapeutic process and developmental changes.
     

PYD806 Psychometric Theory and Application (3 cr.)

This course focuses on techniques for measuring psychological variables with emphasis on standardization, reliability, validity, item analysis, scores, and reporting. The statistical underpinnings of psychometric research are reviewed, including properties of distributions, descriptive statistics, correlation, and factor analysis. Concepts, principles, and methods of modern measurement theory are addressed. The cultural validity of assessment techniques and instruments are examined. Procedures for constructing psychological scales, collecting data on the scales, and evaluating the psychometric properties of the scales are reviewed and practiced.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand and apply statistical concepts fundamental to psychometric research.
  2. Utilize psychometric principles in the selection of instruments to evaluate psychological functioning.
  3. Design and evaluate psychological measurement with consideration of cultural sensitivity and validity.
  4. Construct and analyze psychometrically supported assessment instruments.
  5. Evaluate psychometric features of tests to ascertain that instruments are reliable, valid, and adequately standardized for the anticipated clinical population.

PYD807 Quantitative Research and Statistical Analysis (2 cr.)

This course focuses on developing suitable research designs, selecting appropriate measures, and the appropriate analysis of data for conducting research in clinical practice. Development of the essential skills needed to comprehend, interpret, and critically evaluate published research in the field of counseling psychology and related fields is emphasized. Topics include theory and use of factorial ANOVA, factor analysis, correlation and regression analysis, theory and use of multiple regression, discriminant analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, structural equation models including path analysis, and selected nonparametric approaches.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Develop meaningful research questions and evaluate and select research methodologies which are appropriate to answer these questions.
  2. Analyze quantitative data using appropriate statistical procedures.
  3. Present and interpret the results of statistical analyses.
  4. Critically analyze research articles in professional psychology and related fields.
  5. Identify relevant ethical issues, and demonstrate competency in the application of the APA Code of Ethics with respect to research methods.

PYD808 Qualitative Research Methods (2 cr.)

This course familiarizes students with fundamental concepts, attitudes, and applied skills in the qualitative methodological approaches most applicable to the counseling psychology field. Students have the opportunity for "hands on" experience with qualitative research, including critical literature analysis, the formulation of research questions, proposal development, data collection, data analysis, and writing results in professional prose. Understanding of ethical issues and the development of ethical practice is emphasized throughout.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Describe the comparative strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative methods and how these approaches can be integrated.
  2. Evaluate published qualitative research with an emphasis on critique of design strength, rigor, and study limitations.
  3. Evaluate methodological and ethical considerations associated with employing qualitative methods.
  4. Develop appropriate research questions for qualitative methods of inquiry.
  5. Design a qualitative research study and develop a research proposal.
  6. Analyze qualitative data, interpreting and presenting results in professional prose.

PYD809 Outcome Research and Program Evaluation (2 cr.)

This course provides evidence-based practice training in the understanding of scientific research which supports the practice of psychology. Students gain skills in both the critical analysis of existing research and in the conduct of research to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. The course focuses on the practical implementation of outcome assessment and program evaluation strategies in applied clinical settings.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate professional practice in the context of the scientific evidence which supports it, and describe contemporary understandings of the relationship between science and practice in professional organizations and societies.
  2. Analyze the contribution various research designs and methodologies make to the evidence-based practice of psychology.
  3. Critically evaluate and apply published research studies to the practice of psychology.
  4. Conduct research to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological interventions in applied clinical settings.

Foundations of Professional Practice: 35 cr.

PYD811 Advanced Developmental Psychology (3 cr.)

This course provides an in-depth review of contemporary theory and research on normative lifespan development. The course is advanced in the sense that it assumes the student has knowledge of basic developmental processes and theories from previous coursework. Factors that impact development over the entire lifespan are explored, including biological, cultural, familial, educational, and social issues. Implications of developmental considerations in the understanding of clinical concerns are explored.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Review the process of normative human lifespan development from birth through adulthood and aging.
  2. Apply clinical objectivity, curiosity, open-mindedness, and ethical principles in the understanding of lifespan development in clinical settings.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of both differences and similarities in lifespan development across diverse cultures and minority groups.
  4. Evaluate the impact of developmental processes on the presentation of clinical symptoms and concerns.
  5. Demonstrate competence in the use of research on lifespan development to create strategies for the prevention of psychological distress and to increase the promotion of psychological well-being, including the development of resilience and positive growth models.
     

PYD812 Advanced Psychopathology (3 cr.)

This course examines current theory and research about abnormal development and psychopathology. The primary focus of the course is on the prevention, etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of mental illness. Biological, cultural, familial, educational and social factors that impact psychopathology are explored. The role of the initial clinical interview in assessment, diagnosis, and case formulation is addressed. The role of age-related changes in cognitive and physical functioning in understanding psychopathology is also considered. The course is advanced in the sense that it assumes students have basic knowledge of the DSM-IV and or DSM-V from previous coursework.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Apply clinical objectivity, curiosity, open-mindedness, and ethical principles in diagnostic assessment and case formulation.
  2. Apply currently accepted diagnostic criteria to the assessment and diagnosis of mental disorders in children, adolescents, and adults.
  3. Identify, analyze, and utilize clinical data to make differential diagnoses between co-occurring disorders.
  4. Evaluate and utilize professional and culturally relevant sources of information specifically related to the prevention, etiology, and prognosis of mental disorders across the lifespan.
  5. Identify, evaluate, and utilize appropriate assessment strategies, including biopsychosocial data, for diagnosis and case formulation based on empirically supported guidelines.
  6. Demonstrate competence in initial clinical interviewing and diagnostic procedures in clinically complex situations.

PYD815 Cognitive Assessment (3 cr.)

This course covers administration, scoring, and interpretation of standardized individual tests of cognition and cognitive abilities. These instruments include current versions of standard intelligence and memory scales and their use in the assessment of functioning in areas such a memory and executive functioning. The impact of clients' culture and background on test results, the incorporation of results into psychological reports, and ethical issues are examined.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate and select cognitive assessment instruments using rigorous psychometric principles and practices.
  2. Utilize cognitive assessment instruments to evaluate cognitive ability and cognitive functioning in children, adults, and older adults.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to administer, score, and interpret selected cognitive tests in a manner that is consistent with standard practices and is culturally appropriate.
  4. Integrate test information with interview, collateral, and background information and cultural features.
  5. Effectively communicate test results to colleagues, clients, and other appropriate parties.
  6. Apply ethical standards in the conduct of cognitive assessment.

PYD816 Personality Assessment (3 cr.)

This course explores the theories and concepts of personality assessment and the instruments typically used to assess personality traits and characteristics. Both objective and projective instruments are examined. Topics include administering, scoring, interpreting, and integrating personality test information with interview, collateral, and background information and cultural features. Emphasis is placed on incorporating personality test results into psychological reports and communicating the results to colleagues, the client, and other interested parties. Ethical issues associated with personality assessment are examined.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate and choose sound personality assessment instruments using rigorous psychometric principles and practices.
  2. Identify and account for strengths and weaknesses of both objective and projective instruments.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to administer, score, and interpret selected personality tests in a manner that is consistent with standard practices and is culturally appropriate.
  4. Communicate test results to colleagues, the clients, and other appropriate parties.
  5. Apply ethical standards to the use of personality tests.
  6. Integrate test information with interview, collateral, and background information and cultural features.
  7. Communicate test results to colleagues, the clients, and other appropriate parties.

PYD818 Multiculturalism and Diversity (3 cr.)

This course focuses on how cultural premises and differences in history, life experiences, and world views influence understanding and communication. Emphasis is placed on the perspectives and experiences of underrepresented populations. This course also focuses on roles of the psychologist as educator, researcher, clinician, organizational change agent and policy developer, and the application of the constructs of multiculturalism and diversity to various professional settings.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the processes that underlie the range of attitudes and beliefs that influence perceptions of and interactions with individuals and systems.
  2. Identify personal cultural contexts, biases, and values from a multi-systemic and ecological perspective.
  3. Evaluate professional practices with regards to multicultural responsiveness to and knowledge and understanding of individuals and systems.
  4. Critically evaluate research and theory regarding evidenced-based practices from a multicultural psychological perspective, and identify cultural assumptions underlying all research in psychology.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to conceptualize, analyze, and evaluate individual and group behavior within and across multiple cultural contexts.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of how one might integrate culturally appropriate skills into clinical and other applied psychological practices.

PYD820 Common Factors in Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 cr.)

In this course the theoretical foundations of common factors and efficacy of interventions are examined and applied to the practice of counseling psychology, with an emphasis on the scientific basis for the effectiveness of specific counselor attitudes and behaviors. Specific skills in implementing empirically supported counselor behaviors and attitudes are demonstrated and practiced.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify factors common to effective approaches of psychotherapy.
  2. Evaluate the research relating to efficacy of therapy interventions and evidenced-based practice.
  3. Create appropriate interventions leading to positive client functioning and sense of well-being.
  4. Synthesize an understanding of approaches to psychotherapy to articulate a personal theory of psychotherapy.
  5. Demonstrate interpersonal and clinical skills requisite for the development of a good therapeutic alliance.
  6. Interpret behavior from multiple perspectives and recognize strengths and limitations of the various theoretical perspectives.
     

PYD821 Advanced Cognitive-Behavioral Theories and Techniques (3 cr.)

In this course theories and techniques of cognitive behavioral approaches are evaluated and applied to the practice of counseling psychology. Particular emphasis is placed on empirically supported interventions for specific disorders.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Explain the underlying principles of cognitive behavioral theory.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge to the neurological bases of cognition and connection as it informs case conceptualization and therapy.
  3. Evaluate research in the area of cognitive behavioral approaches, including outcome and process research.
  4. Apply cognitive behavioral techniques in therapy, and identify when utilization of the approach is most appropriate.
  5. Integrate an understanding of diversity into the application of cognitive behavioral approaches with individual clients.
  6. Examine ethical implications when employing cognitive behavioral approaches from the perspective of a professional psychologist.

PYD822 Advanced Psychodynamic Theories and Techniques (3 cr.)

This course provides advanced training in contemporary psychodynamic theory and its application in psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, and consultation. Evidence-based models of psychodynamic and experiential practice are explored. The course emphasizes practical application, including case formulation, clinical strategies and techniques, and the integration of complex dynamic insights into other treatment modalities.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate the theoretical principles of psychodynamic and experiential approaches to psychotherapy.
  2. Evaluate research in the area of psychodynamic approaches, including outcome and process research.
  3. Apply psychodynamic principles to therapy, and identify when the approach is most appropriately used.
  4. Integrate an understanding of diversity into the applicability of psychodynamic approaches to individual clients.
  5. Examine ethical implications in applying psychodynamic approaches.
  6. Generate meaningful clinical inferences and interpretations based on psychodynamic principles.
  7. Function confidently in psychodynamic-oriented treatment settings.

 

PYD825 Ethics and Professional Issues (3 cr.)

This course reviews and applies professional ethics codes, including the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists, and statutes and rules relevant to psychologists to professional issues. An ethical decision-making framework integrating these standards is developed. The implementation and application of ethical standards in professional practice are examined through the workings of professional organizations and licensing boards.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand how ethics are applied and enforced through the work of licensing boards and professional organizations.
  2. Evaluate cultural contexts in ethical decision making.
  3. Incorporate professional compassion with professional standards in evaluating ethical dilemmas.
  4. Identify trends in professional issues in psychology and their impact on professional practice.
  5. Articulate an ethical decision-making framework which integrates evolving professional and individual standards.
  6. Interpret and apply legal guidelines within an ethical framework to resolve professional dilemmas.
  7. Identify relevant ethical issues and demonstrate an understanding of the APA Code of Ethics with respect to research and practice of psychology.

PYD827 Vocational Assessment and Career Counseling (2 cr.)

This course examines theories of career development and the assessment of interests, abilities, aptitudes, and characteristics of the individual and work environment. Topics include sources of educational and occupational information, career trends, various forms of vocational assessment and problem conceptualization, effective vocational intervention, and issues of cultural and individual diversity relevant to the world of work. Emphasis is placed on the integration of work and career issues with other developmental and personal information. The course also provides an introduction to organizational consultation and techniques to analyze work culture and environment.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate theories of career development and career choice as a basis for assessment.
  2. Select career assessment instruments and strategies for their appropriateness for individuals, settings, cultures, and situations.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to administer, score, and interpret career tests and inventories within standard practices and with cultural sensitivity.
  4. Integrate vocational assessment results with other personal and cultural information.
  5. Provide career development interventions to diverse individuals throughout the lifespan.
  6. Identify techniques for consultation with organizations regarding the analysis of work cultures and environments.
     

PYD828 Supervision and Consultation (3 cr.)

This course examines basic theoretical models of supervision and consultation and an introduction to applications in counseling practice. Clinical dilemmas are examined using case examples, with a particular focus on ethics and practice within a multicultural context. In addition to supervision competencies and practical resources for future supervisors, topics include the use of psychological skills in a consultation and the challenges encountered in various consultation venues.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine the theoretical underpinnings of supervision and consultation.
  2. Demonstrate skills applicable to supervision and consultation.
  3. Articulate their personal definition of supervision and consultation.
  4. Articulate issues and feedback needed to improve personal performance.
  5. Evaluate and revise one's personal supervision and consultation model.
  6. Integrate theories and feedback into practical application.
     

PYD829 The Contemporary Practice of Professional Psychology (3 cr.)

This course critically examines current trends, controversies, and opportunities in the professional practice of psychology, utilizing the scholarly literature and newsletters, journals, listservs, and other venues where timely developments in the profession are being proposed and discussed. Students articulate a plan for the further development of their identity as a professional psychologist.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine current trends and controversies in the practice of psychology.
  2. Identify opportunities in and potential obstacles to the specific areas of practice relevant to the student's career goals.
  3. Participate as an informed professional in the activities of local, state, and national professional organizations.
  4. Anticipate and shape future developments in the profession.
  5. Develop an individualized plan for accomplishing the next stages of development as a professional psychologist.

Advanced Training for Professional Practice: 12 cr.

PYD851 Counseling with Children and Families (2 cr.)

This course covers current research and clinical approaches to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of emotional, behavioral, and developmental disorders for children and adolescents and their families. Cultural and ethical issues in the practice of child and family therapy are highlighted. The multiple systems children live in and the stakeholders in the treatment process, including schools, parents, law enforcement, child protection, and welfare agencies, are addressed.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify cultural factors that impact child development, family constellations, and therapy.
  2. Integrate test and interview data, collateral information, and cultural features to develop recommendations for family interventions in school, community, and therapy settings.
  3. Practice a variety of therapy interventions and evaluate their effectiveness with specific ages, issues, and settings.
  4. Evaluate current literature in evidenced-based practice with youth and families.
  5. Present information in ways appropriate to the culture, setting, and education of various stakeholders.
  6. Delineate the ethical issues and concerns involved in assessing and treating mental health and mental illness in children and adolescents.

PYD852 Neuropsychological Assessment (2 cr.)

This course is an introduction to neuropsychological assessment. Procedures for conducting brief assessments to screen for neuropsychological functioning are presented. Instruments to conduct more complete assessments of attention, memory, executive functioning, effort, sensory-motor functioning, and other cognitive processes are demonstrated and discussed. The course reviews communication of findings from neuropsychological assessments as appropriate for various settings and populations.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate and choose sound neuropsychological assessment instruments using rigorous psychometric principles and practices.
  2. Administer, score, and interpret selected neuropsychological assessments in a manner that is consistent with standard practices and is culturally appropriate.
  3. Integrate test information with interview, collateral, and background information and cultural features.
  4. Communicate test results to colleagues, the clients, and other appropriate parties.
  5. Apply ethical standards in the use of neuropsychological tests.

PYD853 Treatment of Trauma and Abuse (2 cr.)

This course examines the nature of trauma, psychological responses to trauma, and the treatment of trauma. A variety of types of trauma are addressed from a bio-psychosocial perspective, including trauma related to such events as domestic violence, rape, child abuse, terrorism, civilian and combatant exposure to war, and natural disasters. The prevention and treatment of vicarious traumatization are also considered.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Integrate knowledge of the neurological, biological, psychological, and social sequelae of trauma and critically evaluate the factors that attenuate or exacerbate responses to trauma.
  2. Apply the transtheoretical model of trauma treatment.
  3. Integrate an understanding of complex multicultural issues into the conceptualization of clients impacted by trauma and the treatment of such.
  4. Analyze different models for treating trauma and the research that supports which treatments to use when and with whom.
  5. Evaluate research in the area of trauma studies across disciplines and theoretical approaches.
  6. Examine the ethical implications of working with trauma survivors.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of secondary trauma and develop strategies for self-care.

PYD854 Projective Assessment (2 cr.)

This course is an introduction to projective personality assessment. The main focus of the course is on the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the Rorschach using contemporary scoring protocols. Selected commonly used projective tests are also presented. The communication of findings from projective assessments as appropriate for various settings and populations is reviewed. The psychometric properties of projective tests are discussed.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to select, administer, score, and interpret selected projective tests in a manner that is consistent with standard practices and is culturally appropriate.
  2. Integrate test information with interview, collateral, and background information and cultural features.
  3. Communicate test results to colleagues, the clients, and other appropriate parties.
  4. Apply ethical standards in the use of projective tests.

PYD855 Group Therapy (2 cr.)

This course applies theories and research of group process and dynamics to the practice of group therapy. Multicultural and ethical issues are evaluated. Group skills and techniques are developed and applied to various types of groups comprised of different populations in diverse settings.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate theories and research for application to different group settings and populations.
  2. Select the appropriate group processes for different settings and populations.
  3. Evaluate ethical issues involved in the delivery of group therapy.
  4. Apply an understanding of ethics in group therapy to practice.
  5. Develop and apply group therapy skills and techniques to different types of groups, populations, and settings.
     

PYD858 Counseling with Substance Use and Addictions (2 cr.)

This course examines addiction and recovery from both the individual's and the clinician's perspective. It provides the student with an understanding of the use of and addiction to alcohol, drugs, medications, gambling, and sex. The course provides skills for the assessment, intervention, treatment, and aftercare of addiction in the context of work as a professional psychologist.


Upon completion of this course students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Examine research and theory on the assessment and treatment of addictions.
  2. Articulate the impact of addictions on the professional practice of counseling psychology.
  3. Understand current developments in the profession of psychology regarding comorbid/co-occurring mental health and chemical health disorders.
  4. Integrate theories of the development, intervention, and treatment of addiction issues with psychological theory.
  5. Differentiate between mental health concerns and addiction problems.
  6. Implement interventions to address addiction problems as distinct from mental health concerns.

 

PYD861 Counseling in Health Care Settings (2 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the role of the psychologist in contemporary healthcare, including integrated care settings. The course emphasizes the medical and psychological aspects of medical conditions which are commonly addressed in health psychology, and the development of basic clinical skills for working in a medical setting. Opportunities for psychologists to practice in healthcare homes, affordable care organizations, and hospitals are explored.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Analyze and compare evolving and predominant models of behavioral health integration and health psychology.
  2. Analyze the biological, psychological, social, cultural, and economic factors as well as barriers to care that affect health and behavior, disease, treatment outcomes, and wellness.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of patterns of health behavior and disease risk in the United States and specific health problems that are common in industrialized nations.
  4. Develop collaboration and consultation skills and a capacity for leadership as a member of a health care team.
  5. Demonstrate understanding of economic factors, ethical-legal standards, and information technology within the health care system.
     

PYD863 Counseling in the Schools (2 cr.)

This course examines the roles psychologists play in K-12 school settings. Topics include conducting assessments for learning disability and emotional, behavioral, and developmental disorders; working with students, parents, and teachers; the development of individualized education plans; and working with mental health issues in a school setting.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Identify cultural and economic factors that impact child development and social and academic success.
  2. Evaluate and select sound child and adolescent assessment instruments for various presenting difficulties.
  3. Integrate test information with interview, collateral, and background information and cultural features and develop recommendations for individualized education plans (IEPs) and classroom interactions.
  4. Practice a variety of therapeutic interventions and evaluate their effectiveness with specific ages and issues, and their appropriateness for the school setting.
  5. Evaluate current literature in evidenced based practice with children and adolescents.
  6. Present information in ways appropriate to the culture, setting and education of parents, teachers, and administrators.
  7. Delineate the legal and ethical issues and concerns involved in treating mental health issues in school settings.
     

PYD864 Counseling in Forensic Settings (2 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to forensic psychological practice. The psychologist's role in procedures and evaluations for cases involving civil commitment, psychosexual functioning, custody, disability, competency, and sexual harassment are discussed. Standards for the completion of written forensic evaluations and ethical requirements specific to forensic practice are reviewed.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Understand the legal basis for the structure and the role of psychologists in the judicial system.
  2. Examine ethical requirements and practice standards in forensic psychological practice.
  3. Demonstrate competence with specific methodologies and report-writing styles for addressing a number of psycho-legal questions.
  4. Examine the relationships among law, psychology, and the mental health system, mental illness, and criminal conduct.
  5. Analyze the ways in which psychology interacts with the legal and governmental systems.

PYD865 Industrial Organizational Psychology (2 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the practice of psychology in the workplace. The role of the psychologist in managing human resources functions such as job analysis, employee appraisal, assessment of employee performance, and employee selection is presented. The role of the psychologist as an organizational consultant is also reviewed. The course emphasizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes requisite for psychologists to successfully function in applied workplace settings.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Select and apply commonly utilized employee assessment procedures.
  2. Recommend procedures for assessing and improving organizational processes in companies and agencies.
  3. Demonstrate the attitudes and skills necessary for successful psychological practice in the workplace.
  4. Identify opportunities for practice as an industrial organizational psychologist.
     

PYD866 Rural Practice (2 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the practice of psychology in rural areas. Research on mental health delivery in rural areas, including prevention, health promotion, integrated care, and consultation is reviewed.  The roles and functions of a psychologist in a rural setting and the influence of the rural context upon professional practice are discussed. The course also provides urban-bound students with knowledge and competencies to provide tele mental health services and to serve rural clients referred to urban specialty clinics. Opportunities to learn from and talk with rural practitioners from around the country are provided.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate the unique perspectives of psychological practice in rural settings.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the empirical foundations of work in rural settings.
  3. Examine ethical and professional issues encountered in rural practice.
  4. Critically evaluate published research about rural practice.
  5. Develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes for working as a psychologist who provides services to rural clients.

PYD871 Counseling in Diverse Ethnic Communities (2 cr.)

This course focuses on how cultural premises and differences in history, life experiences, and worldviews influence understanding and communication within and between ethnic groups. Research, theory, and clinical issues and implications are examined. This course also examines the role of the psychologist as educator, researcher, clinician, organizational change agent and policy developer, and the application of the constructs of multiculturalism and diversity to various professional settings.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate professional practices with regards to multicultural responsiveness to and knowledge and understanding of individuals and systems.
  2. Critically evaluate research and theory regarding evidenced-based practices from a multicultural psychological perspective.
  3. Identify cultural assumptions underlying research and program development in the field of psychology.
  4. Conceptualize individuals according to multiple cultural contexts that interact with and overlap ethnicity.
  5. Integrate culturally appropriate skills into counseling, supervision, consultation, and other applied psychological practices.
     

PYD872 Clinical Issues in Aging (2 cr.)

This course focuses on attitudes, understanding, and behaviors related to the developmental process of aging. Research, theory, and clinical issues and implications are examined. Issues related to cultural differences, social justice, and a personal exploration process are addressed.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the psychology of aging.
  2. Evaluate the research and theory of gerontology regarding the normative aging process, aging difficulties, and the impact of aging on families.
  3. Evaluate clinical issues and applications for aging individuals and their families, including the use of professional literature and research in clinical settings.
  4. Examine ethical issues in clinical work with an aging population.
  5. Integrate and incorporate sensitivity and responsiveness in clinical applications of aging individuals and their families.
     

PYD873 Counseling with Diverse Sexual and Gender Identities (2 cr.)

This course focuses on the research, theory, ethical considerations, and clinical implications concerning affirmative clinical work with individuals who have been marginalized because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Issues of stigma, discrimination, social justice, and personal reflection are addressed.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Demonstrate how cultural and social stigmatization impact the psychological status of sexual minorities.
  2. Utilize psychological research to formulate treatment plans and therapeutic approaches for sexual minorities.
  3. Evaluate benefits and risks associated with therapeutic interventions in this population.
  4. Understand how public policy, social justice, and psychology intersect in addressing the concerns of sexual minorities.
  5. Critically explore how personal experiences and attitudes influence clinical work with sexual minorities.

PYD874 Economic Disparities in Counseling (2 cr.)

This course focuses on attitudes, understanding, and behaviors related to poverty and other monetary issues. Research, theory, and clinical issues and implications are examined. This course also focuses on roles of the psychologist as educator, researcher, clinician, organizational change agent and policy developer, and the application of the constructs of multiculturalism and diversity to various professional settings. Issues related to social justice and a personal exploration process are addressed.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate professional practices with regards to economic conditions and barriers to treatment.
  2. Evaluate research and theory regarding evidenced-based practices from a multicultural psychological perspective.
  3. Identify class values and assumptions underlying research and program development in the field of psychology.
  4. Conceptualize individuals according to multiple cultural contexts that intersect with economic realities in people's lives.
  5. Integrate culturally appropriate skills into counseling, supervision, consultation, and other applied psychological practices.
     

PYD875 Counseling With Immigrants and Refugees (2 cr.)

This course focuses on cultural premises, history, life experiences, and worldviews of immigrant and refugee groups. Research, theory, and clinical issues and implications are examined. This course also focuses on roles of the psychologist as educator, researcher, clinician, organizational change agent, and policy developer.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate the common factors of working with immigrant and refugee groups as well as factors unique to specific immigrant and refugee communities in the U.S.
  2. Evaluate research and theory regarding evidenced-based practices applied to work with immigrant and refugee populations.
  3. Identify cultural assumptions underlying theory, research, and program development in the field of psychology and present barriers to service.
  4. Conceptualize individuals according to multiple cultural contexts that intersect with and overlap ethnicity and immigration or refugee status.
  5. Integrate culturally appropriate skills into counseling, supervision, consultation, and other applied psychological practices.

PYD876 Religious and Spiritual Diversity in Counseling (2 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the role of the psychologist in working with clients from diverse religious/spiritual backgrounds. The course explores historical and current approaches to issues of spirituality and faith in psychology and mental health, considerations for utilizing a client's spirituality in treatment, and related ethical issues.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of current best practices regarding the inclusion of religion and spirituality in the delivery of mental health services.
2. Evaluate the history, research, and theory of spirituality/faith-based approaches to mental health.
3. Evaluate clinical issues and applications for addressing and evaluating spirituality/faith beliefs among individuals and families seeking mental health services, including the use of professional literature and research in clinical settings and assessments appropriate for people from diverse spiritual communities.
4. Examine ethical issues in clinical work with clients with a spiritual/religious identity.
5. Demonstrate sensitivity and responsiveness in clinical work of individuals with spiritual/faith traditions and their families
 

Other Requirements: 18 cr.

PYD800 First Year Proseminar (1 cr.)

This small group experience is conducted in a seminar format and is taken during the student's first semester in the program. The proseminar is designed to introduce the student to professional functioning as a counseling psychologist, review program requirements and expectations, provide support for the transition into doctoral level study, and foster the development of the student's identity as a psychologist. This course is graded on a pass/no credit basis.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Articulate the unique perspective on professional practice offered by counseling psychology.
  2. Understand current developments in the profession of psychology in the context of political, economic, and cultural forces.
  3. Understand program requirements and expectations, and develop an individual plan for progressing through the program.
  4. Develop relationships with fellow students and faculty for mutual support and learning.
  5. Began to formulate and articulate the student's own professional identity as a professional psychologist.

PYD840 Practicum I-A (2 cr.)

This is the first course of a two-semester introductory doctoral practicum experience which includes supervised training in assessment and psychological interventions and focuses on building foundational clinical skills. The relative proportion of assessment and intervention work may vary depending on the practicum site and the individual student's background and training needs. The practicum requires a minimum of 300 hours each of the two semesters. Students on practicum work under the supervision of a doctoral level psychologist. Students also attend a weekly practicum seminar on campus led by a faculty member.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Form productive professional relationships with supervisors and peers.
  2. Demonstrate assessment and counseling skills at the level expected for a doctoral student who is prepared for a second practicum.
  3. Conceptualize case material according to various theoretical orientations.
  4. Apply clinical research to practice.
  5. Present clinical cases for consultation.
  6. Identify cultural and diversity issues relevant to clinical material and professional development.
  7. Integrate feedback from supervisors to improve performance.

PYD841 Practicum I-B (2 cr.)

This is the second course of a two-semester introductory doctoral practicum experience which includes supervised training in assessment and psychological interventions and focuses on building foundational clinical skills. The relative proportion of assessment and intervention work may vary depending on the practicum site and the individual student's background and training needs. The practicum requires a minimum of 300 hours each of the two semesters. Students on practicum work under the supervision of a doctoral level psychologist. Students also attend a weekly practicum seminar on campus led by a faculty member.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Form productive professional relationships with supervisors and peers.
  2. Demonstrate assessment and counseling skills at the level expected for a doctoral student who is prepared for a second practicum.
  3. Conceptualize case material according to various theoretical orientations.
  4. Apply clinical research to practice.
  5. Present clinical cases for consultation.
  6. Identify cultural and diversity issues relevant to clinical material and professional development.
  7. Integrate feedback from supervisors to improve performance.
     

PYD842 Practicum II-A (2 cr.)

This is the first of a two-semester advanced doctoral practicum experience which builds on the skills and experience gained in Practicum I. Practicum sites for Practicum II are individually selected to complement the training received in Practicum I. The practicum requires a minimum of 300 hours each of the two semesters. Students on practicum work under the supervision of a doctoral level psychologist, and attend a weekly practicum seminar on campus led by a faculty member.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Maintain productive professional relationships with supervisors and peers.
  2. Demonstrate assessment and counseling skills at the level expected for a doctoral student prepared for internship.
  3. Demonstrate a complex understanding of how theory influences practice.
  4. Demonstrate a working knowledge of evidence-based interventions in the application of research to clinical practice.
  5. Prepare and present formal case presentations (in preparation for the Clinical Case Presentation).
  6. Synthesize feedback from multiple sources.
  7. Demonstrate insight into the impact of self on others and others on self.
  8. Identify contextual variables that influence clinical practice, research, and professional practice.
     

PYD843 Practicum II-B (2 cr.)

This is the second of a two-semester advanced doctoral practicum experience which builds on the skills and experience gained in Practicum I. Practicum sites for Practicum II are individually selected to complement the training received in Practicum I. The practicum requires a minimum of 300 hours each of the two semesters. Students on practicum work under the supervision of a doctoral level psychologist, and attend a weekly practicum seminar on campus led by a faculty member.
 

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Maintain productive professional relationships with supervisors and peers.
  2. Demonstrate assessment and counseling skills at the level expected for a doctoral student prepared for internship.
  3. Demonstrate a complex understanding of how theory influences practice.
  4. Demonstrate a working knowledge of evidence-based interventions in the application of research to clinical practice.
  5. Prepare and present formal case presentations (in preparation for the Clinical Case Presentation).
  6. Synthesize feedback from multiple sources.
  7. Demonstrate insight into the impact of self on others and others on self.
  8. Identify contextual variables that influence clinical practice, research, and professional practice.

PYD849 Supplemental Practicum (1 cr.)

This practicum experience is designed to supplement the required practicum courses in the Psy.D. program providing additional training, advanced training, or remedial training depending on the needs of the student. The supplemental practicum focuses on a specific area of training of interest to the student, and may, include supervised training in assessment and/or psychological interventions. Students in practicum work under the supervision of a doctoral level psychologist.


Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Practice and demonstrate specific assessment and/or counseling skills.
  2. Integrate theories and clinical research into practical application.
  3. Articulate the impact of clinical experiences on professional functioning including diversity issues.
  4. Record clinical activities and evaluate one's own clinical ability and disposition.
     

PYD856 Play Therapy Across the Lifespan (2 cr.)

This course applies research and theories of play and other experiential processes to the practice of therapy in various contexts.  Attention is paid to the developmental nature and utility of play across the lifespan.   Research about the neurological, social, biological, psychological, and emotional impact of play is integrated into the understanding and development of therapeutic interventions.  Multicultural and ethical issues in the practice of these therapies are addressed.  The course includes both didactic and experiential components.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Evaluate research in the area of play and experiential therapies across disciplines and theoretical approaches.
  2. Integrate information about the neurological, social, biological, psychological, and emotional impact of play with treatment intervention planning.
  3. Identify the developmental, clinical, and cultural factors that indicate the appropriate use of experiential therapies.
  4. Evaluate ethical issues involved in the delivery of play and experiential therapy.
  5. Practice a variety of experiential therapeutic interventions and evaluate their potential effectiveness for specific populations.

 

 

PYD881 Doctoral Qualifying Examination (0 cr.)

The Doctoral Qualifying Examination (QE) is given once a year in early August, and is typically taken at the end of the student's second year of study in the PsyD program. Students are asked to provide written responses to between three and five questions in a take-home format. Each question requires the critical application of knowledge and skills gained in the first two years of course work in the PsyD program. Each question involves a simulated situation encountered in a professional setting, prepared case materials from a simulated client, or other real-world application.

PYD882 Clinical Case Presentation (0 cr.)

The Clinical Case Presentation (CCP) is based on a case from the student's practicum experience, and includes a written and an oral component. The CCP is reviewed by a panel of three faculty members. Students first prepare a comprehensive written case study. Once the written case study is approved, the student discusses the case in a formal case presentation. Feedback is provided at each stage of the process.

PYD885 Individualized Mentorship (3 cr.)

This unique course allows the student to pursue a clinical experience in an area of his or her choosing under the supervision of a licensed doctoral level psychologist. Taken just prior to the internship, the individualized mentorship includes a combination of supervised clinical experience, independent study, research, attendance at workshops, and other learning activities. The individualized mentorship is designed to provide in-depth training in the student's area of specialization, and to develop skills for lifelong learning. Unique student learning outcomes are developed for each mentorship experience.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Create and develop a plan for the development of a new area of professional competency.
  2. Use the necessary professional, research, and community resources to develop a new area of competency.
  3. Document the development of a new area of competency.
     

PYD888 Advanced Doctoral Practicum (1 cr.)

Building on the knowledge and skills gained in Practicum I and Practicum II, the Advanced Doctoral Practicum is an optional training experience that involves clinical work supervised by a Licensed Psychologist.  The practicum experience is structured such that the advanced practicum student focuses on a particular area of interest/specialty as well as continued personal and professional development. During the course of the advanced practicum, the student attends either a faculty-led group seminar or meets individually with a faculty member assigned by the training director. This course does not count toward credits for graduation.

Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be able to do the following:

  1. Practice clinical skills in a specialized area.
  2. Conceptualize clients from complex theoretical perspectives.
  3. Thoroughly evaluate and integrate assessment, historical, and clinical data with empirical research to inform treatment planning and interventions.
  4. Evaluate one's own clinical proficiencies and areas for continued development.
  5. Articulate an emerging professional identity.

PYD990 Internship I (1 cr.)

This is a 2000-hour approved internship experience which can occur over one to two years with a minimum of 20 hours per week at the program-approved site. Learning outcomes are developed individually for each site, considering the mission of the site and the objectives of the student. All internships sites must meet the standards set by the Association of Postdoctoral and Psychology Internship Centers (APPIC).

PYD991 Internship II (1 cr.)

This is a 2000-hour approved internship experience which can occur over one to two years with a minimum of 20 hours per week at the program-approved site. Learning outcomes are developed individually for each site, considering the mission of the site and the objectives of the student. All internships sites must meet the standards set by the Association of Postdoctoral and Psychology Internship Centers (APPIC).

PYD992 Internship III (1 cr.)

This is a 2000-hour approved internship experience which can occur over one to two years with a minimum of 20 hours per week at the program-approved site. Learning outcomes are developed individually for each site, considering the mission of the site and the objectives of the student. All internships sites must meet the standards set by the Association of Postdoctoral and Psychology Internship Centers (APPIC).

PYD993 Dissertation: Proposal Development I (.5 cr.)

In the first of three required clinical dissertation courses, the student develops the proposal for the clinical dissertation. Attendance at a weekly Dissertation Seminar is required as part of this course.

Upon completion of the  proposal development courses, the student is expected to have completed his or her clinical dissertation proposal, and secured approval from the dissertation committee and the Research Review Board.

PYD994 Dissertation: Proposal Development II (.5 cr.)

In the first of three required clinical dissertation courses, the student develops the proposal for the clinical dissertation. Attendance at a weekly Dissertation Seminar is required as part of this course.

Upon completion of the proposal development courses, the student is expected to have completed his or her clinical dissertation proposal, and secured approval from the dissertation committee and the Research Review Board.

PYD995 Dissertation: Data Analysis and Writing I (.5 cr.)

This course continues the student's supervised work on his or her clinical dissertation, as data are collected and analyzed and the final paper is written. Much of this work is conducted independently; however, the student is expected to seek regular consultation with his/her committee chairperson throughout the process.

Upon completion of the data analysis and writing courses, the student is expected to have completed a draft of the final write-up of his or her clinical dissertation, and secured committee approval to move to final editing and the dissertation defense.

PYD996 Dissertation: Data Analysis and Writing II (.5 cr.)

This course continues the student's supervised work on his or her clinical dissertation, as data are collected and analyzed and the final paper is written. Much of this work is conducted independently; however, the student is expected to seek regular consultation with his/her committee chairperson throughout the process.

Upon completion of the data analysis and writing courses, the student is expected to have completed a draft of the final write-up of his or her clinical dissertation, and secured committee approval to move to final editing and the dissertation defense.

PYD997 Dissertation: Colloquium and Final Editing (1 cr.)

Students register for this course in the semester they complete work on the Clinical Dissertation.

Upon completion of this course the student is expected to have passed the final defense of the dissertation, completed final editing, and submitted the bound copy of the dissertation to the library.

PYD998 Dissertation: Extended (.5 cr.)

Early Entry Option

Students enrolled in the Counseling and Psychological Services Master's Program at Saint Mary's University may apply for admission to the PsyD program prior to completion of the MA program, and, if admitted, may enter the PsyD program after completion of approximately one year of full time master's level course work.  Students admitted to the PsyD program under this option may complete their remaining Master's level course work as part of their doctoral training. 

Students admitted to the PsyD program under the early entry option must meet the following requirements and criteria:

1.  The following Master's level courses must be completed with a grade of "A ", "B" , or "P"              (32 credits total):

PY605 Developmental Psychology 3 credits
PY607 Theories of Personality 3 credits
PY608 Psychopathology 3 credits
PY613 Counseling Theory and Technique 3 credits
PY641 Foundations of Family Therapy 3 credits
PY620 Statistical Techniques 3 credits
PY665 Counseling Skills 3 credits
PY625 Ethics and Professional Issues 3 credits
PY606 Psychophysiology 3 credits
PY621 Psychological Assessment 3 credits
PY693 Basic Practicum 3 credits
OR  
PY710 Practicum I 3 credits

2.  The requirement that applicants to the PsyD program must have completed a Master's degree is waived for early entry applicants. The courses listed above are substituted for the required prerequisite courses listed in the PsyD admissions requirements.  All other requirements for admission to the PsyD program must be met by early entry applicants, including the requirement that a GPA of 3.4 or higher must be maintained in Master's level course work.

3.  Early entry applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in their undergraduate coursework and of 3.4 in their graduate course work.

4.  Early entry applicants must provide at least two of the required letters of recommendation from faculty or supervisors familiar with their master's level work.

5.  Candidates for early entry may apply for admission to the Doctoral program after completion of 18 credits out of the courses listed above. If accepted into the doctoral program, admittance is provisional pending satisfactory completion of the remaining prerequisite master's level required coursework.

6.  Students admitted to the PsyD program under the early entry option may elect to complete their Master's in Counseling and Psychological Services through coursework taken in the doctoral program.  The following doctoral courses or their equivalent must be completed for the MA degree (19 Credits total).  Students must also complete the Master's Integrative Paper and Oral examination.

PY818 Muliculturalism and Diversity 3 credits
PYD803 Social and Organizational 3 credits
PYD816 Personality Assessment 3 credits
PYD820 Common Factors 3 credits
PYD821 Cognitive Behavioral or PYD 822 Psychodynamic 3 credits
PYD840-841 Practicum 1-A & 1-B 4 credits
Integrative Paper and Oral Examination 0 credits

Students completing the Master's in Counseling and Psychological Services with the coursework listed above will not meet Minnesota requirements for the LPC or LPCC.  Students seeking this licensure must take at least two additional elective courses in the doctoral program, and should discuss the necessary requirements with their advisor or the Program Director.

Accreditation

The Psy.D. in Counseling Psychology at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). Accreditation information can be obtained from the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association, 750 First Street NE; Washington, D.C. 20002-4242. Phone: 202-336-5979; TDD/TTY: 202-336-6123.

Licensure

The PsyD Program in Counseling Psychology at Saint Mary's University of Minnesota has been granted Designation Status by the ASPPB/National Register Designation Committee effective August 18, 2014. The program is listed with the National Register of Health Service Psychologists in the Minnesota jurisdiction at http://www.nationalregister.org/resources-links/doctoral-programs/approved-doctoral-programs-by-jurisdiction/ .  This means that the program meets the "Guidelines for Defining 'Doctoral Degree in Psychology'" as implemented by the ASPPB/National Register Designation Project. Therefore, a graduate of this designated program who decides to apply for licensure as a psychologist typically will meet the jurisdictional educational requirements for licensing in Minnesota and most other states.




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Daniel Lawrence

SGPP Admission - Enrollment Counselor Graduate School of Health and Human Services

LaSalle Hall-TC Campus, LSH116

Campus Box: # 28

(612) 238-4529

dlawren@smumn.edu